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  1. #1
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    Old music for old guys....

    Noodling around last night, I found a Crosby Stills Nash and Young retrospective on Amazon. Too much blather, and not enough music, but it was cool to be reminded of that ferment in LA when they got their start--Byrds, and Buffalo Springfield begat CSN (&Y).

    What I missed (though I bought a later Stephen Stills live album because I thought he rocked) was Stephen Stills's solo project, Manassas-it was (as the documrntary guys said) under-promoted because the record company wanted CSNY back on the road, and I may have heard something about it--but I listened to it this morning, and it is pretty amazing. Cut in 3 day cocaine-fueled sessions with Chris Hillman, Fuzzy on bass, and an extra percussionist, I think it pointed to the Allmans among other things.

    Full double album conveniently on YouTube:
    https://youtu.be/fVIFmej6VZg
    "There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs."
    John Rogers

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    david crosby's vocal track on 'almost cut my hair' is one of the greatest ever recorded.

    (thanks for the link.)
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

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    It was the music of that period that turned me away from popular music and back to classical. And how much did I love the Byrds and Buffalo Springfield!

    It's not that I didn't try to like the stuff, either. I actually saw Crosby, Stills & Nash at the H'wd Bowl (or was it the Greek Theater?). Joni Mitchell was the opening act. Halfway through CSN's set, they invited Neal Young onto the stage to join in some numbers. Did I mention this once in a long-ago post?
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

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    Oh yeah, I forgot. I loved the Hollies with a passion, as well. A quadra-fecta shoulda-been.
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mapei View Post
    It was the music of that period that turned me away from popular music and back to classical. And how much did I love the Byrds and Buffalo Springfield!

    It's not that I didn't try to like the stuff, either. I actually saw Crosby, Stills & Nash at the H'wd Bowl (or was it the Greek Theater?). Joni Mitchell was the opening act. Halfway through CSN's set, they invited Neal Young onto the stage to join in some numbers. Did I mention this once in a long-ago post?
    I would have loved to see any or all of them live--I think the train of thought was inspired by dinner at a friend's house when he put on the Byrds the other night...

    I think I know what you mean about the change--darker sounds and culminating in stadium rock and excess like CSNY's tour in '74. I remember passing up a chance to see Eric Clapton/Santana double bill around the same time to go to a Norman Granz touring version of 'Jazz at the Philharmonic' instead--that was the sea change for me.

    My distaste was also fueled by seeing the touring blues guys who were still pouring their hearts into their music, playing the small club that I hung out at that really put me off the prima dona rock stars and their 45 minute scripted sets with the obligatory encores.
    "There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs."
    John Rogers

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    Oh, and related--the same friend lent me Dave Van Ronk's 'The Mayor of MacDougal Street'--a source of inspiration for 'Inside Llewyn Davis'. I can't recommend this too highly--it is the story of the early days of "folk" music in the Village--from informal 'hoots' at Washington Square Park, to the early days of folk clubs (Gerdie's Folk City) where these guys finally got paid, the arrival of Bob Dylan and much more.

    Most musicians can't write--but van Ronk is a great story-teller, and I think they just let him talk and then tidied it up a little for publication. At least that's the way it reads...

    The pal that lent the book to me made his debut at Gerdie's--and pretty recently, we got to walk back from a performance and got a personal tour of the Village--the vanished landscape of clubs and bars where he and his pals got their first chances to play...
    Last edited by paredown; 04-28-2018 at 07:38 PM.
    "There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs."
    John Rogers

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    Quote Originally Posted by paredown View Post
    Oh, and related--the same friend lent me Dave Van Ronk's 'The Mayor of MacDougal Street'--a source of inspiration for 'Inside Llewyn Davis'. I can't recommend this too highly--it is the story of the early days of "folk" music in the Village--from informal 'hoots' at Washington Square Park, to the early days of folk clubs (Gerdie's Folk City) where these guys finally got paid, the arrival of Bob Dylan and much more.

    Most musicians can't write--but van Ronk is a great story-teller, and I think they just let him talk and then tidied it up a little for publication. At least that's the way it reads...

    The pal that lent the book to me made his debut at Gerdie's--and pretty recently, we got to walk back from a performance and got a personal tour of the Village--the vanished landscape of clubs and bars where he and his pals got their first chances to play...
    Did I see Dave Van Ronk at the Troubadour? I can't quite remember. I do remember loving the guy, though. I still do his version of Cocaine Blues. And yeah, Inside Llewyn Davis was a good film.
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

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    Sorry, I can't stop myself. I saw the Byrds at the Aquarius Theater days after Crosby ditched the band. The Byrds went on stage as a trio (McGuinn, Hillman, Michael Clarke(?)), with McGuinn doing Crosby's back-up vocals while also doing the lead vocals. They were surprisingly good. I remember somebody from the audience yelling, "Where's Dave?" and Hillman growling, "He's dead."
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mapei View Post
    Sorry, I can't stop myself. I saw the Byrds at the Aquarius Theater days after Crosby ditched the band. The Byrds went on stage as a trio (McGuinn, Hillman, Michael Clarke(?)), with McGuinn doing Crosby's back-up vocals while also doing the lead vocals. They were surprisingly good. I remember somebody from the audience yelling, "Where's Dave?" and Hillman growling, "He's dead."
    That's funny. For a long time I was sure he WAS dead. My wife corrected me.

  10. #10
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    Filling in some blank spots in my 'old music' collection, I just bought a re-release CD of Lou Reed's Transformer...
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  11. #11
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    I've got nothing but "gaps"--lost albums in moves, stuff left at my mom's when I went to grad school, things that wore out, cassettes that died, "borrowed" music that never returned etc.

    The great thing for me recently has been hanging out with musicians, being reminded of stuff, and then going back and re-sampling--Alexa is a great help here. We spent a whole night with another Village rat (memories of sharing elevators with Bob Dylan when they were both carrying instruments, sitting on the stoop outside the basement tenement where John Sebastian was practicing before he was famous)--reminiscing and asking Alexa to play this or that...

    I've kind of resigned myself to the fact that I will never have the stereo system that I dreamed about in my youth, or all my music in one place and in one format that I can call up, but Alexa makes a halfway decent substitute for most of what I want to listen to.
    "There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs."
    John Rogers

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mapei View Post
    Did I see Dave Van Ronk at the Troubadour? I can't quite remember. I do remember loving the guy, though. I still do his version of Cocaine Blues. And yeah, Inside Llewyn Davis was a good film.
    From the book, he did a fairly long stint in LA (1958-9)--probably a little early for you to have heard him then. He played at the Insomniac in Hermosa and the Unicorn on the Strip. If you saw him play in the Village then I'm jealous of that too...
    "There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs."
    John Rogers

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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Filling in some blank spots in my 'old music' collection, I just bought a re-release CD of Lou Reed's Transformer...
    I bought that LP when it first came out because I had to have "Take a Walk on the Wild Side." Boy did I get heat from my friends, who were all organic hippies. "That pervert," one once growled. I still listen to the LP, some forty years on. The sax solo on Wild Side's lead-out still knocks me out. As "evocative" a stretch of music that's ever been recorded.
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mapei View Post
    I saw the Byrds at the Aquarius Theater days after Crosby ditched the band. The Byrds went on stage as a trio.
    cool. i'd love to see them like that, but with Gram.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    cool. i'd love to see them like that, but with Gram.
    I saw them with Gram. At the Troubadour. Good seats at a small club. They were as happy as they were angry at the Aquarius. I might have even seen them in one of those moments where Gene Clark was a member again. Or am I just daydreaming? In any case, the Byrds were my favorite band for years. I was too young go to any gigs they might have done in their first couple years or so, but as soon as I was old enough I'd see them whenever they played in L.A. Did I see them at that fabled hippie venue the Ash Grove, too? Ah, my concert going days...
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

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    I saw CSN around 1978 in a Big venue, the cap centre. It was the best concert I have ever seen. They often x could be terrible in concert with their harmonies off but there night I saw them they were on. They came out and played 2 1/2 hours and then walked off

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigrider View Post
    I saw CSN around 1978 in a Big venue, the cap centre. It was the best concert I have ever seen. They often x could be terrible in concert with their harmonies off but there night I saw them they were on. They came out and played 2 1/2 hours and then walked off
    I saw CSN&Y in November 1969 at Winterland in San Francisco. They had just finished the sessions for "Deja Vu", but the album wasn't released until about 4 months later. It was an amazing show. They did about an hour and half of acoustic stuff to start, in various combinations, then Stills said, "We're gonna take a break then come back and play some electric music and boogie a little." The second half was beyond electric. The vocal chemistry was perfect, and the band was tight and wired. I especially remember the long jam in the middle of "Bluebird," with Stills and Young standing face to face trading guitar licks until they and everyone in the hall were jumping up and down and screaming.

    Good times with good friends, some of them gone long ago.
    Have you ever been to Electric Ladyland?

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    Speaking of old music for old guys: I'm down with Pergolesi, especially his Stabat Mater. Check out Charles Dutoit leading the Montreal Sinfonietta, with the wonderful June Anderson and Cecilia Bartoli singing (London Records). Heavenly. ;)

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    Y'all should try some Jimmy Buffett...
    Bad decisions make great stories - JP

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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by KojoAkimbo View Post
    Speaking of old music for old guys: I'm down with Pergolesi, especially his Stabat Mater. Check out Charles Dutoit leading the Montreal Sinfonietta, with the wonderful June Anderson and Cecilia Bartoli singing (London Records). Heavenly. ;)
    Good suggestion. Spotify doesn't have that particular recording, but it has several others. Very nice.

    If you're in the mood for something a little (125 years) older, I really enjoy Monteverdi's 1610 Vespers.
    Have you ever been to Electric Ladyland?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chain View Post
    Y'all should try some Jimmy Buffett...
    after a successful lobotomy, he would sound swell!

    jk. he would still suck balls.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chain View Post
    Y'all should try some Jimmy Buffett...
    Used to share an apartment with a guy who was a fan--before JB became an industry, and then a parody. I could stand it--just.
    Last edited by paredown; 05-03-2018 at 03:07 AM.
    "There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs."
    John Rogers

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    Gram Parsons is someone else that I came to late--I think T0G and I were blabbing about him at one point.

    I bought a double CD (GP and Grevious Angel I think) because I needed some road music, and it was cheap. I was stunned, since I had never really heard him as a solo performer.

    Years later, Emmylou Harris still said those recordings where she sang with him were her peak musical experience...

    The drugs though--for all these guys it really took a toll, and pretty much killed GP.
    "There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs."
    John Rogers

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    I've gotten into Buck Owens, Ernest Tubb, and The Louvin Bros through this podcast: https://cocaineandrhinestones.com/
    I lost my phone number. Can I have yours?

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    Like this thread....Manassas should arrive today..hopefully. Just recently acquired Bert Jansch: A man I'l Rather Be...other side of the world but my oh my, some good music on the set.
    So I tuned the Larrivee, drop D, then DADGAD.

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