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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    I really hate putting a 2 1/8 hole saw to the face of a brand new door

    Yes I'm sure, that doesn't mean I'm right.
    Once it's put together and you see the hole's in the right spot it ain't so bad.
    Too old to ride plastic

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Once it's put together and you see the hole's in the right spot it ain't so bad.
    Exactly.....!
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  3. #28
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    Itís just a hole. Iíve seen grown men run a paddle bit through the face of a door drilling out for the mortise locks. Thatís just a hole too, only a worse kind.

    Measure once cut it three times and itís still too short.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10ae1203 View Post
    Itís just a hole. Iíve seen grown men run a paddle bit through the face of a door drilling out for the mortise locks. Thatís just a hole too, only a worse kind.

    Measure once cut it three times and itís still too short.
    Uh huh!!!
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    I really hate putting a 2 1/8 hole saw to the face of a brand new door

    Yes I'm sure, that doesn't mean I'm right.
    We picked up our entry door from the local field rep for some big door company. He does the warranty calls--someone complains about marked up finish or whatever, and he typically goes on site with the new door.

    Most contractors though don't like drilling the holes or doing lock set, so he usually gets offers for cash if he will install them, since the warranty only covers the door. Makes extra money all the time doing this.

    Best yet, he harvests the slightly damaged doors and sells them on Craigslist, which is how we ended up with killer 2 1/8" ballbearing hinged mahogany monster door for about 40% of retail. I helped install (too heavy/big for one person) to ease the pain a little more.

    I can't even see the couple of marks that made it a reject since we have added a few of our own in the 4 or so years it has been up.
    "There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year oldís life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs."
    John Rogers

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    When I built this house it was square and plumb....that....goes away over time! 7 doors eh, you gotta be pretty good at it by now! LOL
    Not that good, I'm afraid.
    Here's worst of the not-square. Take a look at that top rail. The 30-inch-wide door is fully 3/4" shorter on one side. In the basement below there's an undersized beam that has sagged visibly. When I bought the house 28 years ago I put a post under it, so at least it has stopped moving, but that's about all that can be done. That, and just resolve to enjoy the "character" of an old house.
    Quit picking at it, it will never heal-door-top.jpg
    Have you ever been to Electric Ladyland?

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCavilia View Post
    Not that good, I'm afraid.
    Here's worst of the not-square. Take a look at that top rail. The 30-inch-wide door is fully 3/4" shorter on one side. In the basement below there's an undersized beam that has sagged visibly. When I bought the house 28 years ago I put a post under it, so at least it has stopped moving, but that's about all that can be done. That, and just resolve to enjoy the "character" of an old house.
    You could have jacked it up and REALLY caused problems! (all the way to the roof)

    We put an addition on our house 25 years ago (or more) and the second floor was sitting on a ladder truss on exterior wall (gable end. I VERY, VERY carefully calculated what I would need to do to create a regular truss out of it and cut dozens of diagonals to tap in between the uprights. When I finished, I cut the exterior wall out, the final 2 x 6 I knew I would know the verdict. The sawzall blade didn't bind! HOWEVER the top part of the stud did come UP off the cut about a 1/2 inch. DOH>>>>>>>>>> a bit too tight on the V things. (at least 20 of them). OK....floor had a half inch crown, not that big a deal. EXCEPT the drywall cracked all the way to the third floor!!!!!!!!!!!

    Live and learn

    Yeah.....my house hasn't moved that much, and as far as sagging, it isn't going to. BUT it is built out of wood....and the first floor supported and wrapped in 18 inches of fieldstone and concrete.
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by paredown View Post
    We picked up our entry door from the local field rep for some big door company. He does the warranty calls--someone complains about marked up finish or whatever, and he typically goes on site with the new door.

    Most contractors though don't like drilling the holes or doing lock set, so he usually gets offers for cash if he will install them, since the warranty only covers the door. Makes extra money all the time doing this.

    Best yet, he harvests the slightly damaged doors and sells them on Craigslist, which is how we ended up with killer 2 1/8" ballbearing hinged mahogany monster door for about 40% of retail. I helped install (too heavy/big for one person) to ease the pain a little more.

    I can't even see the couple of marks that made it a reject since we have added a few of our own in the 4 or so years it has been up.
    you new here boy?...USELESS WITHOUT PICTURES!
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by paredown View Post
    We picked up our entry door from the local field rep for some big door company. He does the warranty calls--someone complains about marked up finish or whatever, and he typically goes on site with the new door.

    Most contractors though don't like drilling the holes or doing lock set, so he usually gets offers for cash if he will install them, since the warranty only covers the door. Makes extra money all the time doing this.

    Best yet, he harvests the slightly damaged doors and sells them on Craigslist, which is how we ended up with killer 2 1/8" ballbearing hinged mahogany monster door for about 40% of retail. I helped install (too heavy/big for one person) to ease the pain a little more.

    I can't even see the couple of marks that made it a reject since we have added a few of our own in the 4 or so years it has been up.
    That last entry door we installed last summer was a heavy MOFO...holy crap, we actually used a floor jack to get it up into place. 2 of us couldn't do it by hand
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    you new here boy?...USELESS WITHOUT PICTURES!
    I know, I know...

    Here's a couple of shots--it was a two window inset, and one window became the door entry. Parged the block, did new copper flashing, redid siding and fitted door....
    Quit picking at it, it will never heal-inside.jpg
    Quit picking at it, it will never heal-outside.jpg
    Quit picking at it, it will never heal-dscn1140.jpgQuit picking at it, it will never heal-dscn1139.jpg
    Last edited by paredown; 06-01-2018 at 02:35 AM.
    "There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year oldís life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs."
    John Rogers

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by paredown View Post
    I know, I know...

    Here's a couple of shots--it was a two window inset, and one window became the door entry. Parged the block, did new copper flashing, redid siding and fitted door....
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Copper.... Sweet! Love what you've done. Now, about the porch! Lol. What are you doing for railing?
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  12. #37
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    So Pare, how long have you been living in the construction zone? You are giving us a run for our money. We called ours done at 30 years. (with 6 more years of remodeling!)
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    So Pare, how long have you been living in the construction zone? You are giving us a run for our money. We called ours done at 30 years. (with 6 more years of remodeling!)
    I think we are going into year 9 ()...

    The porch is actually poured, and slate covered, as is the ledge under the windows, but I can't find pictures of it. Did the pour myself (with a little help from my lovely wife), using my new little mixer. Used most of a yard of gravel so it won't move around. No railing though--it is only about a 6" step up now, and once I finish the slate 'sidewalk' to the door, it should be level with the porch. Getting that slate in, and finishing the front lawn (and some set slates to get around the side of the house) is on the agenda for this year.

    The house is also stained (that was last year's project--to finish the staining)--two coats,, lots of carpenter bee repairs, and some other repair spots.

    This was end-of-last year's project--another door. This is kind of the 'back door'--when the family was growing up, this was the kids' private door (they had cool parents).

    What we inherited was a failing wall/two large panels of single pane glass/site built rotting window frames and a really weathered door--this was the in-progress--you can see the stain color. This was another jog-in like the front, but was badly done (they had sawn off the tops of all the floor joists to get the height for their mudpack and slate--it was bad enough that my contractor friend was talking about putting props underneath to keep it from falling in on itself--and the inset was not deep enough to be useful.

    So I redid the top course of block along the opening, boxed in all the damaged joists and re-built the wall flush. This is all finished now, but here's an interim shot:Quit picking at it, it will never heal-wall_proj.jpg
    Last edited by paredown; 06-01-2018 at 02:53 AM.
    "There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year oldís life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs."
    John Rogers

  14. #39
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    Oh--and that door was pretty heavy--it's another bargain off Craigslist--Pella Architect series-- an it is a full 8' 0 x 3' with that glass. The only way I could get it into place was using a lot of 2x trims for cribbing--I'd get one corner up, and my lovely wife would stick another piece of 2x under it, then opposite corner--rinse-repeat until I had it at the right height so I could walk it back into position.

    It was a gut buster though...

    (Windows are bargain cast-off Andersens--they are now painted to match the door trim)
    "There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year oldís life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs."
    John Rogers

  15. #40
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    Primer is on, maybe first coat of paint tomorrow.
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  16. #41
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    Primer and 2 coats, I will do a 3rd tomorrow. I did pull the molding off, it's just easier. I made this stuff, from rough sawn cherry, close to 30 years ago. The corner blocks have the holes in the back from the face plate from the lathe from turning them.

    Yes I'm sure, that doesn't mean I'm right.
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  17. #42
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    I learned a lesson this weekend.. not all paint can be colour matched across brands. We found a Behr color (Flashy Sapphire, it's a dark vibrant blue) we liked, had Sherwin Williams color match it.. it turned out translucent, regardless of the number of coats, and you can see all the roller and brush marks as it gets slightly darker in areas where there is overlap. Even after using a grey primer. There went $100 worth of paint. I gave up and when with Behr paint and primer..

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljvb View Post
    I learned a lesson this weekend.. not all paint can be colour matched across brands. We found a Behr color (Flashy Sapphire, it's a dark vibrant blue) we liked, had Sherwin Williams color match it.. it turned out translucent, regardless of the number of coats, and you can see all the roller and brush marks as it gets slightly darker in areas where there is overlap. Even after using a grey primer. There went $100 worth of paint. I gave up and when with Behr paint and primer..
    Well that sucks. I am using PPG Grand Distinction, which, has been discontinued. However, last year I bought a gallon for 1 door. I have had a lot of luck with PPG paints. However, this time I did use Zinser 123 primer to get a better bond to the vinyl around the window.

    Yes I'm sure, that doesn't mean I'm right.
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    Well that sucks. I am using PPG Grand Distinction, which, has been discontinued. However, last year I bought a gallon for 1 door. I have had a lot of luck with PPG paints. However, this time I did use Zinser 123 primer to get a better bond to the vinyl around the window.

    Yes I'm sure, that doesn't mean I'm right.
    Saturated colors are hard, because you need to start with the right base, & I don't think the recipes that are shared between brands are accurate. I was matching a Frank Lloyd Wright color--Cherokee Red--that was marketed recently as a Pittsburgh color. No dealers for that around here, so one Benjamin Moore shop mixed it for me--two coats later on the old front door and it is too pink...

    Got my new garage doors up, and wanted to paint them the right version of the color, and had the guys at the BM dealer I go to all the time now give it a go. They mixed it from the shared recipe--too pink again. Then they did a scan off the Pittsburgh brochure and tried a couple of other tweaks, including using a different base to start with, Forty-five minutes later, I got a gallon of what looks to be a pretty good match...

    For priming hard to cover stuff these days, we've had good luck with Stix--same paint store recommended to me for painting over doors that had a clear finish over wood:
    Stix¬ģ Waterborne Bonding Primer SXA-110, Primer

    Red is this:Quit picking at it, it will never heal-cherokee.jpg
    Last edited by paredown; 06-03-2018 at 05:40 PM.
    "There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year oldís life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs."
    John Rogers

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by paredown View Post
    For priming hard to cover stuff these days, we've had good luck with Stix--same paint store recommended to me for painting over doors that had a clear finish over wood:
    The door is fiberglass, which grabs paint nicely, but the vinyl extrusion around the window is the issue. I asked about using an alkyd, but they warned against it.
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by paredown View Post
    Saturated colors are hard, because you need to start with the right base, & I don't think the recipes that are shared between brands are accurate. I was matching a Frank Lloyd Wright color--Cherokee Red--that was marketed recently as a Pittsburgh color. No dealers for that around here, so one Benjamin Moore shop mixed it for me--two coats later on the old front door and it is too pink...

    Got my new garage doors up, and wanted to paint them the right version of the color, and had the guys at the BM dealer I go to all the time now give it a go. They mixed it from the shared recipe--too pink again. Then they did a scan off the Pittsburgh brochure and tried a couple of other tweaks, including using a different base to start with, Forty-five minutes later, I got a gallon of what looks to be a pretty good match...

    For priming hard to cover stuff these days, we've had good luck with Stix--same paint store recommended to me for painting over doors that had a clear finish over wood:
    Stix¬ģ Waterborne Bonding Primer SXA-110, Primer
    That was what the research has told me. It does vary by color though, and from what I have read, a lot of the brands use universal color pigments, which is why they can color match pretty easy.

    I like Sherwin Williams paint, I have had great experience with it. And up till this current project, I have had no issues with the color matching. My wife seems to prefer the shades offered by Behr.. I can't tell the difference between one dark blue and the next that might be off by a hair.. but my wife.. she can name the damn things.

    I picked up the can of Behr earlier. Left side (bottom since the pic got rotated) is the original SW paint that was matched (the sample drop they put on the top of the cans matched perfectly, but once on the wall it was horrible). Right side (Top) is the Behr, and the color we wanted to end up with.

    Quit picking at it, it will never heal-img_5922.jpg

  22. #47
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    Moulding is re-installed and boingy door stop so it doesn't hit the mirror on the wall. When I made this moulding, you couldn't go to a lumber yard and buy black cherry so I had to make it in black cherry... All to match a bowl that I turned on the lathe. Like a snowball rolling down a hill.

    Yes I'm sure, that doesn't mean I'm right.
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    Moulding is re-installed and boingy door stop so it doesn't hit the mirror on the wall. When I made this moulding, you couldn't go to a lumber yard and buy black cherry so I had to make it in black cherry... All to match a bowl that I turned on the lathe. Like a snowball rolling down a hill.

    Yes I'm sure, that doesn't mean I'm right.
    That grain is amazing. Nice work on the wood lathe! (And the door!!)

    When I was a young lad, my dad made us a wood lathe. Did a fair bit of turning, and got some decent results even with the not-pro level chisels we could afford. I gave away a lot of teak candle holders as presents--but I don't think I even saved one of them for myself.
    "There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year oldís life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs."
    John Rogers

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by paredown View Post
    That grain is amazing. Nice work on the wood lathe! (And the door!!)

    When I was a young lad, my dad made us a wood lathe. Did a fair bit of turning, and got some decent results even with the not-pro level chisels we could afford. I gave away a lot of teak candle holders as presents--but I don't think I even saved one of them for myself.
    Thanks, yeah I was headed to the shop to get some paying work done and walked past my wood pile. A chunk caught my eye, it had an interesting bark swirling thing going on. That was inside it. I wasn't done with it but it started to crack and wobble and I was not too interested in throwing it at myself from the lathe.


    I actually never got any real work that day
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  25. #50
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    Beautiful, ToG!
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

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