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  1. #26
    i like whiskey
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwayne Barry
    I liked the first one well enough, but when I was listening to the second one while reading Tolstoy and listening to Wally Lamb's book it really lost its appeal. The characters started to seem really shallow and unbelievable, particularly Salander (sp?). I guess mostly a question of limited time. I probably wound have finished it if I didn't have better alternatives at hand.

    I have the movies in my queue on Netflix and plan to watch them.
    I read the second one sitting in my deer stand this season. Took me a few weeks, but it definitely helped pass the time nicely. I don't analyze books too much. If I'm enjoying it, I'll keep reading. I don't care if the characters are plausible or shallow. Lisbeth Salander is definitely out there. I like her. I have never gotten into anything like you are reading.

    Movie was very good. Much of the detail from the book was left out, which is always the case. It streamlined the story a bit, which was good. There are a few very intense scenes with Lisbeth and her "guardian". My wife stopped watching and left the room and did not return.

  2. #27
    jaded bitter joy crusher
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    Quote Originally Posted by gamara
    One of my favorite reads is Michael Crichton's State of Fear. An excellent work of fiction.
    The thought of recommending this to Art853 made me ROTFLMAO.

    Were you impressed by Crichton's subtle irony in having the politically correct anthropologist eaten by cannibals? Or did the trope of a novel with footnotes appeal more?
    Fredke commented in your thread. You won't believe what happens next!

  3. #28
    your text here
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    world war z
    i asked for it for xmas. mil gave it to me excited i was getting into history. i chuckled.

    im also reading the latest metal cowboy book, mud, sweat, and gears. dont care tfor teh cliched titled, but i like it so far. irt has inspired me to research and ride the hennepin canal this summer. i will also try and take The Boy on a longer trip. not an overnight, but longer destination rides.
    I don't normally "do people." - Dr. Roebuck

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by saf-t
    If you liked Into Thin Air, I'd highly recommend The Climb, by Anatoli Boukreev, which presents a different take on the same expedition- and forever tainted my perception of Krakauer as an accurate and unbiased writer.
    Yes I am aware that Boukreev wrote of his own account of the same expedition. I have also read much of the back and forth, he said vs. he said about that May on Everest. It's a shame that Anatoli is no longer with us. I don't know much about Krakauer. I do feel that 10 writers could have been on that trip and we'd have 10 books and each one would have a different perspective. IMHO of course....

    Next on my list is Miracle in the Andes: 72 Days on the Mountain and My Long Trek Home by Nando Parrado. I also plan to read Aron Rawston's book. I'm on a surviving life threatening experiences kick of sorts...

  5. #30
    Power Napper
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZoomBoy
    . I do feel that 10 writers could have been on that trip and we'd have 10 books and each one would have a different perspective. IMHO of course.....
    You are right about 10 different books. After reading Krakauer (who I generally like as an author) and Boukreev I obsessed about those events for a while. Also read "Climbing High" by Lene Gammelgaard, and "Left For Dead" by Beck Weathers. Both are more autobiographic and while the Everest events are highlighted aren't the sole subject of the books.

    Ralston's book is great. If you're into survival books right now also check out "Touching the Void" by Joe Simpson and "The Long Walk" by Slavomir Rawicz Btw Kevin Macdonald's documentary of "Touching the Void" (same title) is excellent.
    "When it shall be said in any country in the world, my poor are happy; neither ignorance nor distress is to be found among them; my jails are empty of prisoners, my streets of beggars; the aged are not in want, the taxes are not oppressive; the rational world is my friend, because I am the friend of its happiness: when these things can be said, then may that country boast its constitution and its government." -Thomas Paine

  6. #31
    Get me to In&Out
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    For a fun read and a way to blow a diet, read "Playing for Pizza" by John Grisham. No-brainer fiction but has amazing stories about Italian food. Not one of his legal books, it is about a washed up NFL quarterback who ends up in Parma Italy. I read it on my drive to Florence and it was fun.
    Cyclists really need to learn a little Rule #5.

  7. #32
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    On a biography kick lately. Just got done with Life by Keith Richards and am now reading a bio of Lester Bangs who was a gonzo music critic for Creem Magazine (good read, but needed a better editor). I have Patti Smith's Just Kids (re: her and Robert Mapplethorpe in NYC) up next. High hopes for that one. The Richards bio was also a really fun read.
    "I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark." -S. Hawking

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bocephus Jones II
    I have Patti Smith's Just Kids (re: her and Robert Mapplethorpe in NYC) up next. High hopes for that one.
    Just bought that for my wife (if she doesn't start it really soon, it's mine )
    We'll be back soon, there will be more of us, and next time we won't be dropping leaflets.

    “The problem with quotes on the internet is that it’s hard to verify their authenticity” – Abraham Lincoln

  9. #34
    jaded bitter joy crusher
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    Quote Originally Posted by theBreeze
    Kevin Macdonald's documentary of "Touching the Void" (same title) is excellent.
    Indeed. That was a great movie.

    Not exactly a documentary, though. Kind of sui generis on account of the huge amount of re-enactment.
    Fredke commented in your thread. You won't believe what happens next!

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredke
    Indeed. That was a great movie.

    Not exactly a documentary, though. Kind of sui generis on account of the huge amount of re-enactment.
    The book went into much more detail than the move (as usual). If you really want to know what was happening in his head when he was in that crevasse then read the book. Lots of technical details also for those who do this type of mountaineering.

    Anyone read (the late) Goran Kropp's book about biking to Everest (and back) and then climbing it without oxygen? Same time as the ill-fated Into Thin Air expedition. He's mentioned in Krakauer's book as a "Crazy Swede." Not a great book, but an interesting different perspective.
    "I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark." -S. Hawking

  11. #36
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    I just finished Atlas Shrugged. It was a good read, although I admit I skimmed some of the rhetoric, and most of the radio speech near the end.

  12. #37
    jaded bitter joy crusher
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbates
    I just finished Atlas Shrugged. It was a good read, although I admit I skimmed some of the rhetoric, and most of the radio speech near the end.
    John Scalzi on Atlas Shrugged:
    I enjoy Atlas Shrugged quite a bit, and will re-read it every couple of years when I feel in the mood. It has a propulsively potboilery pace so long as Ayn Rand’s not having one of her characters gout forth screeds in a sock-puppety fashion. Even when she does, after the first reading of the book, you can go, “oh, yeah, screed,” and then just sort of skim forward and get to the parts with the train rides and motor boats and the rough sex and the collapse of civilization as Ayn Rand imagines it, which is all good clean fun.
    ...
    That said, it’s a totally ridiculous book which can be summed up as Sociopathic idealized nerds collapse society because they don’t get enough hugs. (This is, incidentally, where you can start your popcorn munching.) Indeed, the enduring popularity of Atlas Shrugged lies in the fact that it is nerd revenge porn — if you’re an nerd of an engineering-ish stripe who remembers all too well being slammed into your locker by a bunch of football ********s, then the idea that people like you could make all those ********s suffer by “going Galt” has a direct line to the pleasure centers of your brain. I’ll show you! the nerds imagine themselves crying. I’ll show you all! And then they disappear into a crevasse that Google Maps will not show because the Google people are our kind of people, and a year later they come out and everyone who was ever mean to them will have starved. Then these nerds can begin again, presumably with the help of robots, because any child in the post-Atlas Shrugged world who can’t figure out how to run a smelter within ten minutes of being pushed through the birth canal will be left out for the coyotes. Which if nothing else solves the problem of day care.
    Fredke commented in your thread. You won't believe what happens next!

  13. #38
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    I was couch ridden sick all weekend, and can only take so much football, so I got to bang out two books.

    Salt by Mark Kurlanski. It's about, you guessed it, Salt, and it's role in world history. Very interesting book.

    One of Ours by Willa Cather. I'd read it before a few years ago but it's still great. I really like all her books but this one is way up on the list.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredke
    John Scalzi on Atlas Shrugged:
    That was brilliant, and sums up my opinion (albeit more succinctly and with far better vocabulary). Thanks for the quote!

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbates
    I just finished Atlas Shrugged. It was a good read, although I admit I skimmed some of the rhetoric, and most of the radio speech near the end.
    I remember it being a tortuous read except for a few passages here and there. The kind of book where I hate my strong compulsion to finish what I start.

    I always think people who say they like Rand's books are sort of like Christian's who say the Bible is a good read

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwayne Barry
    I remember it being a tortuous read except for a few passages here and there. The kind of book where I hate my strong compulsion to finish what I start.
    Same for me with James Joyce's Ulysses. Couldn't force myself all the way through Finnegan's Wake though. One professor said the best way to read that book was to tear out all the pages and throw them on the ground and then read in the order you pick them up.

    //and don't get me started on Henry James' The Golden Bowl...if I have to read another of those overblown 2 page long paragraphs ever again I may gouge my eyes out.
    "I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark." -S. Hawking

  17. #42
    jaded bitter joy crusher
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bocephus Jones II
    One professor said the best way to read that book was to tear out all the pages and throw them on the ground and then read in the order you pick them up.
    Makes me think of Cortázar's Rayuela (Hopscotch).
    the novel has 155 chapters, the last 99 being designated as "expendable." These "expendable" chapters fill in gaps in the main story, while others add information about the characters or record the aesthetic and literary speculations of a writer named Morelli (arguably a stand-in for the author) who makes a brief appearance in the narrative. The book can be read either in direct sequence from chapter 1 to 56, which, Cortázar writes, the reader can do “with a clean conscience,” or by hopscotching through the entire set of 155 chapters—except chapter 55—according to a table provided by the author that leaves the reader, finally, in an infinite loop between the last two chapters in the sequence. There are other ways to read the novel, such as reading only the odd or even pages, or choosing chapters in completely random order.
    Fredke commented in your thread. You won't believe what happens next!

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredke
    Makes me think of Cortázar's Rayuela (Hopscotch).
    the novel has 155 chapters, the last 99 being designated as "expendable." These "expendable" chapters fill in gaps in the main story, while others add information about the characters or record the aesthetic and literary speculations of a writer named Morelli (arguably a stand-in for the author) who makes a brief appearance in the narrative. The book can be read either in direct sequence from chapter 1 to 56, which, Cortázar writes, the reader can do “with a clean conscience,” or by hopscotching through the entire set of 155 chapters—except chapter 55—according to a table provided by the author that leaves the reader, finally, in an infinite loop between the last two chapters in the sequence. There are other ways to read the novel, such as reading only the odd or even pages, or choosing chapters in completely random order.
    well here's an excerpt from FW for a taste...I never could find any drugs good enough to have this make any sense.

    Someone tried a translation here:

    http://www.fweet.org/

    [...] riverrun, past Eve and Adam's, from swerve of shore to bend of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs.
    Sir Tristram, violer d'amores, fr'over the short sea, had passen- core rearrived from North Armorica on this side the scraggy isthmus of Europe Minor to wielderfight his penisolate war: nor had topsawyer's rocks by the stream Oconee exaggerated themselse to Laurens County's gorgios while they went doublin their mumper all the time: nor avoice from afire bellowsed mishe mishe to tauftauf thuartpeatrick not yet, though venissoon after, had a kidscad buttended a bland old isaac: not yet, though all's fair in vanessy, were sosie sesthers wroth with twone nathandjoe. Rot a peck of pa's malt had Jhem or Shen brewed by arclight and rory end to the regginbrow was to be seen ringsome on the aquaface. The fall (bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonner- ronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenth ur- nuk!) of a once wallstrait oldparr is retaled early in bed and later on life down through all christian minstrelsy. The great fall of the offwall entailed at such short notice the pftjschute of Finnegan, erse solid man, that the humptyhillhead of humself prumptly sends an unquiring one well to the west in quest of his tumptytumtoes: and their upturnpikepointandplace is at the knock out in the park where oranges have been laid to rust upon the green since dev- linsfirst loved livvy.
    "I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark." -S. Hawking

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio
    Finished the entire Sherlock Holmes series: B&N had the entire thing on two volumes for like $8 per book. I really enjoyed it.

    Currently about half way through Galapagos by Vonnegut. I'm workign my way through all of his stuff, though, and I'd suggest anything by him.


    joe
    Just got Volume 1 for $1.99 on my Nook. Looking forward to reading the series for my first time.
    "Sticking feathers in your butt doesn't make you a chicken"
    -Tyler Durden

  20. #45
    2 busy workin' 2 hang out
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    I really enjoyed a look back at how Omaha formed and all the corrupt things that went on. I don't know if an outsider would enjoy it but as a current local, I sure did.

    One little example is how the Omaha World-Herald implied the public should lynch an untried black man and then joked about it afterwards. What a shitty paper.

  21. #46
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    "Life"

    By Keith Richards.

  22. #47
    jaded bitter joy crusher
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bocephus Jones II
    well here's an excerpt from FW for a taste...I never could find any drugs good enough to have this make any sense.
    I had a friend in college who could recite the first chapter from memory.

    It's a lot better when you hear it recited than when you try to read it.

    Oh, and did you know that the book is an infinite loop? The first chapter starts in the middle of a sentence and the last chapter ends in the middle of the same sentence.
    Fredke commented in your thread. You won't believe what happens next!

  23. #48
    Misfit Toy
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    I'm reading crap.
    It's all fun and games until someone ends up in a cone.

    Don't make me go all honey badger on your ass

  24. #49
    Frog Whisperer
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    Quote Originally Posted by snapdragen
    I'm reading crap.
    really?........me too.....reading lounge posts....LOL
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right......

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bocephus Jones II
    Same for me with James Joyce's Ulysses.
    He's one author I have no desire to tackle. The few I know who have tried say he's practically unreadable.

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