Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 9W9W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2,599

    Surprise, surprise, all the cycling in the world can't out cycle a bad diet.

    It turns out what they say is true: If you watch what you eat and how much you eat, the weight will just fall off. Wife and I started eating less& eating cleaner. We ditched bread, sugars, and I stopped drinking whatever little beer I did drink. We haven't gone entirely rouge, there's still a Lindt chocolate bar in the fridge, and I'll still have a croissant with my coffee once a week, oatmeal, we still steam dumplings (Trader Joe's 4 life!) and I still snack on carby things and steal my 1 year old's Goldfish, but generally smaller portions with no starchy fillers for us.

    I shed -15lbs on my way to -22lbs. The missus weight loss is a closely guarded secret, but it shows too. I am putting out personal best times on all climbs, some tight kits fit better, and its that much easier to breathe while hanging out in the drops. Who woulda thunk it, eh?

    For those trying to lose a few let me introduce you to CICO: Calories in, calories out.
    "That pretty much sums it up. I'm 43 and my max is ~178-180. If that HR chart was mine or Froome's, we'd be on the verge of death. But for you it probably looks like a normal workout." -TLG

    LOLOLOL

  2. #2
    LWP
    LWP is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    5,471
    I think it varies. For me, as far as weight goes, I can out cycle a bad diet better than I can out diet a lack of exercise. Without exercise, it seems like I gain weight walking past a head of lettuce.
    Crusty old farts are people too.
    - 10ae1203

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    5,022
    Quote Originally Posted by 9W9W View Post
    It turns out what they say is true: If you watch what you eat and how much you eat, the weight will just fall off. Wife and I started eating less& eating cleaner. We ditched bread, sugars, and I stopped drinking whatever little beer I did drink. We haven't gone entirely rouge, there's still a Lindt chocolate bar in the fridge, and I'll still have a croissant with my coffee once a week, oatmeal, we still steam dumplings (Trader Joe's 4 life!) and I still snack on carby things and steal my 1 year old's Goldfish, but generally smaller portions with no starchy fillers for us.

    I shed -15lbs on my way to -22lbs. The missus weight loss is a closely guarded secret, but it shows too. I am putting out personal best times on all climbs, some tight kits fit better, and its that much easier to breathe while hanging out in the drops. Who woulda thunk it, eh?

    For those trying to lose a few let me introduce you to CICO: Calories in, calories out.
    I would say check back in a year. People lose weight all the time counting calories... for a while. Then, once the willpower is exhausted it comes right back. In fact the Weight Watchers/Jenny Craig/etc business model is based upon people losing weight, gaining it back and re-joining their plans

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 9W9W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2,599
    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    I would say check back in a year. People lose weight all the time counting calories... for a while. Then, once the willpower is exhausted it comes right back. In fact the Weight Watchers/Jenny Craig/etc business model is based upon people losing weight, gaining it back and re-joining their plans
    Damn, talk about being negative.

    Three years ago I rode 3,700 miles and lost seven pounds. I was the go for 40 mile ride, then beer and burger kind of guy. This year I stopped eating bread and crap and dropped double this with barely any riding. I think we all agree about that calories in/calories out works. How you want to deal with the excess is your prerogative. Some people exercise, some eat less. I had completely ZERO accountability for what I put into my body back then. I do now. It's not strict calorie counting as much as being conscious about what I pick up.

    In addition to eating slightly less, I eat higher quality foods. I swapped out zero fat yogurt for full fat yogurt. I no longer worry how much fat is in my avocado and I used to put half sugar in my coffee, and now I don't.

    I am not on a diet, and don't want to lose any more than 20lbs (who wants to buy new clothes and all that crap and then eventually gain some back). But, I do not expect to go back to my starch/carb heavy Eastern European diet. I expect this new comfortable and sensible way of eating will help me keep weight in check.
    "That pretty much sums it up. I'm 43 and my max is ~178-180. If that HR chart was mine or Froome's, we'd be on the verge of death. But for you it probably looks like a normal workout." -TLG

    LOLOLOL

  5. #5
    Cleavage Of The Tetons
    Reputation: rideit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    402
    There is a saying I heard long ago, something to the effect of "You can not eat in order to bike better, or you can bike more in order to eat whatever you want...I choose the latter" .
    Was an easy thing to live by at 30, but much harder to live by at 51.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: kiwisimon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    6,310
    Congrats on the weight loss, both of you. Thanks for sharing your experiences. How long have you been living the new life? Any cravings?

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: MoonHowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    475
    My story is very similar. I cut down on the carbs and fasted periodically; managed to drop about 25 pounds with very little exercise. I never dropped much more the 5 lbs from cycling/exercise alone.

    It changed my mind set about eating esp. that every time I feel hungry I don't have be eating something. I can also get on the bike in the morning in a fasted state and take a reasonably long ride without noodling.

    I have zero concern about keeping the weight off.

  8. #8
    Ricardo Cabeza
    Reputation: Andy69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    17,823
    Quote Originally Posted by 9W9W View Post
    It turns out what they say is true: If you watch what you eat and how much you eat, the weight will just fall off. Wife and I started eating less& eating cleaner. We ditched bread, sugars, and I stopped drinking whatever little beer I did drink. We haven't gone entirely rouge, there's still a Lindt chocolate bar in the fridge, and I'll still have a croissant with my coffee once a week, oatmeal, we still steam dumplings (Trader Joe's 4 life!) and I still snack on carby things and steal my 1 year old's Goldfish, but generally smaller portions with no starchy fillers for us.

    I shed -15lbs on my way to -22lbs. The missus weight loss is a closely guarded secret, but it shows too. I am putting out personal best times on all climbs, some tight kits fit better, and its that much easier to breathe while hanging out in the drops. Who woulda thunk it, eh?

    For those trying to lose a few let me introduce you to CICO: Calories in, calories out.
    Ever since I hit my mid 40s I've had a bit of a struggle with weight. I've always been fitness conscious and it doesn't sit well with me. I've also discovered that things I used to do to keep it in check no longer work. But in the last couple years I've discovered a few things regarding weight loss as it pertains to me personally.

    I generally don't eat a lot of starch and sugar, with the exception being ice cream (once or twice a week) and an occasional plate of pasta (a couple times a month). I'm strictly a meat and potatoes kind of eater, with emphasis on the meat, along with piles of green stuff. I also drink a lot of beer.

    I've always thought, hey, it's the beer (beer gut!), and have on occasion given up beer for weeks in an attempt to drop a few pounds, with the result being no weight loss. There have also been times when I've said screw it and proceeded to drink beer every day (15-25 in a week), with the result being a loss of 5-10 pounds in short order.

    After paying close attention to what I've eaten during these periods of weight loss, I found that I've eaten less and avoided crappy food. Imagine that.

    My conclusion is, beer is not necessarily bad and should not be avoided. I just need to not go overboard. One or two, even three, is fine, but 6-8 is not. Pair that with not going overboard on the food, and getting to the gym at least 4 times a week, and the weight is coming off.

    Of course, being an eater, I can't resist stuffing my face while on vacation. We ate dinner at Jerry's in Gallup NM and I seriously wanted to throw a cot in their store room (enchiladas and ribeye with green chile sauce )
    Whenever the legislators endeavour to take away and destroy the property of the people, or to reduce them to slavery under arbitrary power, they put themselves into a state of war with the people who are thereupon absolved from any further obedience, and are left to the common refuge which God hath provided for all men against force and violence - John Locke

    SuperAndy's Garage

  9. #9
    Boobies!
    Reputation: paredown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    8,006
    Congrats on the weight loss!

    Another theory that I have been hearing about is that we need to follow our circadian rhythm--and confine our eating period to a confined time period--at the outside 12 hrs, but preferably less. Set a a regular sleep pattern and then try to confine your eating to that period. Especially stop snacking after the 12 hrs is up, and before you go to bed, since it sends conflicting wake-up signals to the body. The researchers who have been investigating this found that people who followed this regime were able to maintain a healthy weight, while the control group ate exactly the same number of calories--and managed to gain weight.

    The second part of their research confirms that we should follow the German proverb--'Eat like a king in the morning, like a merchant at lunch and like a peasant at dinner.' So front end load the day, and especially eat a light dinner--you will sleep better too.

    I'm down about 5# since the beginning of June--started riding again, trying to follow the above, and trying to eat less. I do have a wicked sweet tooth though, so it is going slower than I would like....
    Last edited by paredown; 08-03-2018 at 05:11 AM.
    "A man is judged by the company he keeps, and a company is judged by the men it keeps, and the people of Democratic nations are judged by the type and caliber of officers they elect."
    William J.H. Boetcker

  10. #10
    Frog Whisperer
    Reputation: Touch0Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    39,840
    I quit putting 1/2 and 1/2 in my coffee in the morning about 2 and a half years ago and have steadily lost weight since then (10 pounds, about 4 per year) I try to eat clean but I eat when I am hungry, which is not necessarily 3 times a day, or even once a day sometimes. But I have always eaten like that.
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 9W9W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2,599
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy69 View Post
    My conclusion is, beer is not necessarily bad and should not be avoided. I just need to not go overboard. One or two, even three, is fine, but 6-8 is not. Pair that with not going overboard on the food, and getting to the gym at least 4 times a week, and the weight is coming off.
    I couldn't fall asleep the other night so I went downstairs cleaned out my daughters snack cup and washed down some hydrocodone syrup with a Brooklyn Lager (at 2:40AM). There's a bar of salt/caramel chocolate in the fridge that I'm working my way through. I haven't gone cold turkey with anything except bread/potatoes. For example, I had crepes with whipped cream this morning (usually its steel oats). So I agree with you, there's no need to go all-in and eat sprouts all day.

    What we started to do for dinner and sometimes supper - we're European, so on those days that dinner is early, especially weekends - is cut up a bunch of avocado, cheese, strawberries, blueberries, hard boiled eggs, baked chicken pate, a slice of turkey or hotdog for the kid and just pick at that. In the past we'd make something that involved some of those ingredients but now it's just deconstructed in cubes with the good stuff on the plate to pick from. Baked chicken pate is simply amazing, dry fluffy, we ate 1/4th pound each yesterday and the night before. My salads are also of the berry, citrus, seed, nut variety instead of the cobb type with bacon, corn, etc.. on balance, more stuff is eaten in its basic form instead of being combined into some elaborate recipe. Avocado? Great, spray lemon/lime on in done, in the pat it would have went into some salad with other ingredients (yogurt/mayo).

    I also noticed less Costco shopping trips and more Trader Joe's trips. The small package sizes (3-4 servings) enough for dinner or dinner and lunch the next day, coupled with availability of things like very thin dough skin gyoza dumplings (300calories for 10, lunch right there) or califlower stir fry instead of rice stir fry brought variety to our table. Also, I don't eat out of boredom now.

    We were never averse to eating healthy, perhaps we just claimed we did, or didn't put our foot down when parents rolled in with some heavy meat/potatoes type of cooking, and were not honest with ourselves about how much we do and how much we claim we do. I can't think of anything else we're doing but I know I don't feel like I'm dieting.
    "That pretty much sums it up. I'm 43 and my max is ~178-180. If that HR chart was mine or Froome's, we'd be on the verge of death. But for you it probably looks like a normal workout." -TLG

    LOLOLOL

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 9W9W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2,599
    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    I quit putting 1/2 and 1/2 in my coffee in the morning about 2 and a half years ago and have steadily lost weight since then (10 pounds, about 4 per year) I try to eat clean but I eat when I am hungry, which is not necessarily 3 times a day, or even once a day sometimes. But I have always eaten like that.
    Four pounds? It's important to implement a consistent weighing regimen. I vary by five pounds per day. I come back two pounds lighter from a hard/sweaty ride. I once took a five pound poop.
    "That pretty much sums it up. I'm 43 and my max is ~178-180. If that HR chart was mine or Froome's, we'd be on the verge of death. But for you it probably looks like a normal workout." -TLG

    LOLOLOL

  13. #13
    Frog Whisperer
    Reputation: Touch0Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    39,840
    Quote Originally Posted by 9W9W View Post
    Four pounds? It's important to implement a consistent weighing regimen. I vary by five pounds per day. I come back two pounds lighter from a hard/sweaty ride. I once took a five pound poop.
    I keep close track of my weight, I am talking about my AVERAGE being down 10 pounds. Losing 2 pounds by dehydration is easy I do it almost every time I ride. My AVERAGE weight used to be between 128 and 135, now, it is 120 (between 115 and 125) I get concerned if I drop under 118 and essentially force feed myself.

    pretty lean for 6 foot 5 huh? (just kidding, 5 foot 5 is closer to the truth)
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    3,489
    Not a regular here but the thread caught my eye. First and foremost, huge congrats to you and Mrs. 9W9W! It's a struggle for sure.

    Second, CICO, IMO, is it. Period. The what, when and how you eat is all insulin control and satiation control if that makes sense. In super broad strokes eating "healthy" food mellows the insulin and hunger sensations which makes it easier to eat less.

    The one neat aspect to weight loss I stumbled on years ago was during a time in my life I was physically unable to do any cardio (besides warming up on a recumbent before physical therapy). No cardio for me made it waaaay easier to control CICO. Onlyt when I started back training again did I gain weight. Presumably some muscle gain but, I have been steadily eating more each year since my episode (8 years now)!

    Stepped on the scale the other day and am 20lbs above where I was at the end of my PT/no cardio. My power and fitness have been really good and still are but, climbing has steadily gone from average at best to just ******* shitty. So, back to a calorie counting app to hold myself accountable. After a couple days I'm astounded how quickly calories add up. Trying to lose weight and keep fitness will be a new venture for me...Best of luck going forward!

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    227
    Quote Originally Posted by 9W9W View Post
    It turns out what they say is true: If you watch what you eat and how much you eat, the weight will just fall off. ......
    I shed -15lbs on my way to -22lbs. The missus weight loss is a closely guarded secret, but it shows too. I am putting out personal best times on all climbs, some tight kits fit better, and its that much easier to breathe while hanging out in the drops. Who woulda thunk it, eh?

    For those trying to lose a few let me introduce you to CICO: Calories in, calories out.
    Great to hear. Congratulations. You are inspiring me to clean up my act and tweak my intake so I can drop a few.

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: BCSaltchucker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,897
    rode a lot last year, prepping for 3 fondos in the fall. Lost 15 lbs.

    winter came. gained 16 lbs

    lol. So I firlsty disagree. I can lose weight with a lot of riding. when you burn 4400 kcal on a single rider, it is hard to eat that back!

    but then in winter when I couldn't ride 120km in a day (cold wet winters) it then became a matter of needing to starve myself. So I am generally in agreement, calorie counting is key for most, most of the time.

    ideally I become a global snowbird: summers in the PNW and winters in New Zealand or sumthun. Otherwise, time to get hungry + stay that way
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  17. #17
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 9W9W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2,599
    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    Otherwise, time to get hungry + stay that way
    As one poster mentioned, insulin control, as a result of the quality of food ingested does dictate hunger spikes.
    "That pretty much sums it up. I'm 43 and my max is ~178-180. If that HR chart was mine or Froome's, we'd be on the verge of death. But for you it probably looks like a normal workout." -TLG

    LOLOLOL

  18. #18
    Ricardo Cabeza
    Reputation: Andy69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    17,823
    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    I quit putting 1/2 and 1/2 in my coffee in the morning about 2 and a half years ago and have steadily lost weight since then (10 pounds, about 4 per year) I try to eat clean but I eat when I am hungry, which is not necessarily 3 times a day, or even once a day sometimes. But I have always eaten like that.
    I use a lot of half and half in my coffee, so just for grins I started keeping track after I read this.

    I'll be damned if I don't consume 400-600 calories worth every morning. I've cut back.
    Whenever the legislators endeavour to take away and destroy the property of the people, or to reduce them to slavery under arbitrary power, they put themselves into a state of war with the people who are thereupon absolved from any further obedience, and are left to the common refuge which God hath provided for all men against force and violence - John Locke

    SuperAndy's Garage

  19. #19
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 9W9W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2,599
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy69 View Post
    I use a lot of half and half in my coffee, so just for grins I started keeping track after I read this.

    I'll be damned if I don't consume 400-600 calories worth every morning. I've cut back.
    Incremental gains.

    I'm in Nashville for work. I had half a rack of dry rub ribs, slaw and bbq beans. Felt incredibly guilty, but I had it, it's done/checked and now back to my usual.

    I love coffee and will never switch from whole milk and dilute my experience. I usually pull three double-shots per day, that's about a half cup of whole milk in total that goes into that.

    Often times people just go all-in, and that's when they tend to cheat and repeat old eating habits. I think where we lost the most is eating more ingredients for dinner, instead of always cooking things. My wife noted that these kinds of meals are good for the summer, but wonders how we will get on when winter rolls around.
    "That pretty much sums it up. I'm 43 and my max is ~178-180. If that HR chart was mine or Froome's, we'd be on the verge of death. But for you it probably looks like a normal workout." -TLG

    LOLOLOL

  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: mtrac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    1,256
    Quote Originally Posted by 9W9W View Post
    For those trying to lose a few let me introduce you to CICO: Calories in, calories out.
    My experience is that once I get over 150 miles per week, which includes a lot of climbing, I need to eat with a shovel to maintain my weight. Commuting alone keeps me in the low 130s on a 5'6" frame.

  21. #21
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 9W9W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2,599
    Quote Originally Posted by mtrac View Post
    My experience is that once I get over 150 miles per week, which includes a lot of climbing, I need to eat with a shovel to maintain my weight. Commuting alone keeps me in the low 130s on a 5'6" frame.
    I rode nearly 4K miles and lost 7 pounds on a bad diet. In two months, riding no more than 300 miles total, I lost 15.

    I should also mention that the 4K was comprised of long 30-60 mile rides. Whereas the 300 miles total was almost entirely short, fast, hard 10-15 mile rides.
    "That pretty much sums it up. I'm 43 and my max is ~178-180. If that HR chart was mine or Froome's, we'd be on the verge of death. But for you it probably looks like a normal workout." -TLG

    LOLOLOL

  22. #22
    Master debator.
    Reputation: nOOky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    8,385
    Congrats on the weight loss! I mostly run nowadays (I know, I know) but I still ride enough to consider myself a cyclist. I found it easier to keep my weight down when cycling a lot, mainly because I could stay aerobic for more hours each week. Running burns more calories, but you can't do it for the same amount of time each week.

    Diet is everything though, I make a lot better choices now and I try to time my macro intake depending on the time of day which I think helps. Basically I eat most of my carbs early in the day, and transition to more protein later in the day.
    "I felt bad because I couldn't wheelie; until I met a man with no bicycle"

Similar Threads

  1. The Alpine Diet ie. nastiest diet ever invented
    By bigrider in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 01-31-2012, 05:31 PM
  2. Surprise! Surprise! Surprise!
    By Deus_Ex_Machina in forum Politics Only
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 01-07-2011, 12:58 PM
  3. Surprise Surprise Surprise
    By Dumbod in forum Litespeed - Merlin
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-23-2009, 05:57 AM
  4. Surprise, Surprise, Surprise
    By Bocephus Jones in forum Politics Only
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-28-2004, 05:25 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

roadbikereview.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.