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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    Ahhhhh spring is in the air, when a homeowners fancy turns to TRASHING THE HOUSE!
    hahahha.. I have been trashing my houses since the late 90's :P Nothing to do with the season..

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine View Post
    make sure you buy several wax rings. I always screw up the first one, and usually the second one as well. Might want to have John help you put the toilet back in

    Dammit just got back from the hardware store with one ring! John suggested four bolts, but the guy said two should suffice, as they're sold in pairs anyway. I'm not even sure what to do with the plaster........

    John's new job has him working like crazy- extra hours and even Saturdays, so I'm trying to pick up some of the slack. Hoping to have most of this done by tonight so he can just help me seat the toilet.

    You just need to make enough contact for the seals and gaskets to do their jobs...and don't forget the Teflon tape!

    Teflon tape?? Might need that for Part II: Subfloor replacement
    And at least a 12 pack....
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Birddog View Post
    You should not need teflon tape on this install. A plumber told me he always uses two wax rings per install, I tried it and it works great, Use one premium one with the rubber skirt and one bare bones type on top. If the wax isn't pliable enough a couple secs in the Microwave does wonders. Is that plaster on the floor or is it maybe drywall mud, Scrape/chisel it off with a painters 5 in one tool. Make sure your flange bolts are stainless steel and make sure they aren't too long or the caps wont snug up. Make sure you replace the supply line, you are asking for an unfixable drip if you don't.
    The teflon tape is for the supply lines.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljvb View Post
    hahahha.. I have been trashing my houses since the late 90's Nothing to do with the season..
    We built this house from scratch, every stick, every stone. Didn't take us long..... 30 years! I got stories!
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  5. #30
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    Nice going Christine. We're proud of you.
    Last edited by Eretz; 2 Weeks Ago at 04:35 PM.
    In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
    Ben Franklin -Tis curious and amazing to observe how distinct and independent of each other the rattles of this animal are, and yet how firmly they are united together
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  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    We built this house from scratch, every stick, every stone. Didn't take us long..... 30 years! I got stories!
    It's on my list of todos's one day, but where I live (the DC MD area), not too many places to be able to do that, or time as I work full time, and we still need a place to live. So I'll have to settle on doing extensions myself.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljvb View Post
    The teflon tape is for the supply lines.
    The connection at the valve should be a compression fitting (3/8) and the one on the tank should have a rubber gasket. You don't ordinarily use teflon tape on either connection. There is the rare time when a compression connection at the valve has an annoying drip when tightened securely. Sometimes a single wrap of teflon will stop the drip, but compression fittings are designed differently than pipe thread fittings. The connection at the tank should be tightened by hand and then maybe a quarter turn with a pliers. Turn on the supply and tighten a quarter turn till no leak is present. Teflon tape is for NPT pipe threads.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine View Post
    Just got back from the hardware store: wax ring,
    If it's not too late, return the wax ring. Use the neoprene toilet ring instead. Wax deforms over time and it leaks again whereas the foam stuff rebounds and stays sealed.

    toilet flange replacement-gaskets-seals-wax-rings-bl01-64_1000.jpg

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Birddog View Post
    The connection at the valve should be a compression fitting (3/8) and the one on the tank should have a rubber gasket. You don't ordinarily use teflon tape on either connection. There is the rare time when a compression connection at the valve has an annoying drip when tightened securely. Sometimes a single wrap of teflon will stop the drip, but compression fittings are designed differently than pipe thread fittings. The connection at the tank should be tightened by hand and then maybe a quarter turn with a pliers. Turn on the supply and tighten a quarter turn till no leak is present. Teflon tape is for NPT pipe threads.
    Mine are not compression fittings, 1/2 threaded. Guess it just depends on who did the plumbing before me. Have 3 1/4 turn ball valves I'll be replacing the original ones with that so have compression fittings since I did not want to use adapters on the faucet setup I have once we are done tiling and installing the vanity.

  10. #35
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    Christine -- How did it go?

  11. #36
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    You guys are scaring me with all this advanced plumbing talk.

    John came home last night and seemed to brace himself before venturing upstairs to assess the damage. He said everything looked fine though

    He then explained all the stuff that has to be done that the videos didn't really cover: Gotta scrub the bottom/inside part of the toilet that we can't normally reach (meh, doesn't seem like a priority). Also need to scrape the residual wax off the bottom of the toilet (no idea how to tip without breaking; he doesn't want me to remove the tank.)

    Didn't want to get him involved at all, but it might be best to get his help with Part II. My biceps feel sore and I have a heat patch on my lower back.

  12. #37
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    Yeah, you want to scrape old the old wax seal off the floor and the underside of the toilet. A putty knife works pretty well. Wear gloves and/or wash your hands really well after you finish. That foam rubber seal looks tempting, but how well does it hold up over a decade? Whoever suggested two wax seals maybe on to something. there would be some residual wax oozing out of the seal, but that's easily cleaned up.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine View Post
    You guys are scaring me with all this advanced plumbing talk.

    John came home last night and seemed to brace himself before venturing upstairs to assess the damage. He said everything looked fine though

    He then explained all the stuff that has to be done that the videos didn't really cover: Gotta scrub the bottom/inside part of the toilet that we can't normally reach (meh, doesn't seem like a priority). Also need to scrape the residual wax off the bottom of the toilet (no idea how to tip without breaking; he doesn't want me to remove the tank.)

    Didn't want to get him involved at all, but it might be best to get his help with Part II. My biceps feel sore and I have a heat patch on my lower back.
    Do suggest removing the tank, it's not very difficult on just about any two-piece toilet (two bolts inside the tank), and it'll make moving the thing a lot easier, with less chance of breaking stuff. A sponge can help remove that last bit of water, so you don't get it everywhere.

    Second vote for the neoprene toilet rings, btw. Also, why are you considering removing the old cast-iron tube, if I may ask?
    More Americans wanted Hillary Clinton to be President than wanted Donald Trump.

  14. #39
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    You want the cast iron tub. They hold heat better. Plastic tubs are gross. I remodeled a bathroom a few years ago and replaced the old tub with a new, slightly larger cast iron tub. One of the guys bidding on the project said a plastic tub was definitely better. Another guy, the guy I hired, laughed when I said that and told me 'the guy doesn't want to haul an iron tub up the stairs'.

  15. #40
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    Just a couple of points: There are shims made of plastic that are just for leveling toilets. They can be found at your favorite big box or Ace Hardware. I'm with John, if the tank isn't leaking and the bolts look OK, don't mess with it. When the stool is mounted, run a bead of caulk around the base (pick a color that matches the floor as near as possible, you'll never find pink). I like the oversized toothpaste style tubes as they are easier to handle in tight spaces. Using a caulk gun behind the stool can be a pain. Finally, resist any temptation to bite your fingernails while doing this project.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljvb View Post
    Mine are not compression fittings, 1/2 threaded. Guess it just depends on who did the plumbing before me. Have 3 1/4 turn ball valves I'll be replacing the original ones with that so have compression fittings since I did not want to use adapters on the faucet setup I have once we are done tiling and installing the vanity.
    I don't think I've seen a toilet supply valve that wasn't either 1/2" by 3/8" comp or 1/2" by 1/2" comp and the latter is rare around these parts. 1/4 turn ball valves are the way to go esp. in areas that have hard water. Not many things worse than a balky toilet supply valve when the toilet is over running the bowl.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Birddog View Post
    1/4 turn ball valves are the way to go esp. in areas that have hard water. Not many things worse than a balky toilet supply valve when the toilet is over running the bowl.
    This.... And NEVER replace faucet or fixture without new supply line. (and if at all possible, connect supply line to faucet before installing said faucet. Unless you are partial to working upside down, behind the sink, in the cabinet)
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Birddog View Post
    Finally, resist any temptation to bite your fingernails while doing this project.
    Best advice ever!
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Birddog View Post
    I don't think I've seen a toilet supply valve that wasn't either 1/2" by 3/8" comp or 1/2" by 1/2" comp and the latter is rare around these parts. 1/4 turn ball valves are the way to go esp. in areas that have hard water. Not many things worse than a balky toilet supply valve when the toilet is over running the bowl.
    It's a screwy setup, this is basically what I have (except the valve is straight through not right angle). My guess, they just dumped the compression ring and nut, and connected the line directly. I have no idea why, and the valve does not close completely, fortunately I sweated in 2 ball valves inline in the utility room to shut off water to the second floor altogether when I redid the well plumbing. That is another major project. I used CPVC to replace the rusty galvanized piping because I was being cheap, and copper is ridiculously expensive, so to save some cost (as we are paying two mortgages at the moment) I went with cpvc piping and replaced the pressure tank connections (the T on that with a pressure gauge and blowoff valve were a small fortune). But the pipes stick out a little due to their location, and that is also the laundry room... I can just see my kid or wife carrying a giant basket of laundry whacking and breaking the pipes and water going everywhere.....




  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljvb View Post
    I used CPVC to replace the rusty galvanized piping....
    Never forget to glue a joint! Guess how I know?
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    Never forget to glue a joint! Guess how I know?
    Same reason I know atleast the well pump breaker was close by. You dry fit everything, then glue along the way and oops you missed one..

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljvb View Post
    It's a screwy setup, this is basically what I have (except the valve is straight through not right angle). My guess, they just dumped the compression ring and nut, and connected the line directly. I have no idea why, and the valve does not close completely, fortunately I sweated in 2 ball valves inline in the utility room to shut off water to the second floor altogether when I redid the well plumbing. That is another major project. I used CPVC to replace the rusty galvanized piping because I was being cheap, and copper is ridiculously expensive, so to save some cost (as we are paying two mortgages at the moment) I went with cpvc piping and replaced the pressure tank connections (the T on that with a pressure gauge and blowoff valve were a small fortune). But the pipes stick out a little due to their location, and that is also the laundry room... I can just see my kid or wife carrying a giant basket of laundry whacking and breaking the pipes and water going everywhere.....



    That looks like a 1/2" NPT X 3/8" (OR 1/2") Comp supply valve. The supply line looks like a 3/8" comp X 3/8" comp. Stool supply lines have a different fitting on one end. For some reason I can't cut and paste image.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    Whoever suggested two wax seals maybe on to something.
    Bad idea. I've tried it 6 years ago because my old toilet has deeper concave under where it seats on the ring (1 ring was too short). The problem with wax is that each time we bear our body weight on it, a.k.a. sit on toilet, it causes micro movement and over time it breaks the seal because wax doesn't rebound. It only took 1 year to leak again in my case. Then I replaced with neoprene ring (yes, the whole procedure all over again ), which is little taller than wax ring so only 1 was needed and it compresses as you tighten the nut. It's been 5 years and no problem so far (knock knock).

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Birddog View Post
    That looks like a 1/2" NPT X 3/8" (OR 1/2") Comp supply valve. The supply line looks like a 3/8" comp X 3/8" comp. Stool supply lines have a different fitting on one end. For some reason I can't cut and paste image.
    I just completed a valve addition job in my kitchen last week. I bought one of those valves. They are either 1/2" or 3/8" brass fit thread labeled as "FIP" at the incoming side and 3/8" outside diameter compression thread at the output side. Those 2 threads have different spacing. You have to make sure the existing supply pipe thread is compatible.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljvb View Post
    Same reason I know atleast the well pump breaker was close by. You dry fit everything, then glue along the way and oops you missed one..
    Mine held for YEARS! Until I killed the well and bled off the pressure, the when I started it back up..... POW!. I was REALLY lucky, shower on the third floor!
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

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