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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Birddog View Post
    That looks like a 1/2" NPT X 3/8" (OR 1/2") Comp supply valve. The supply line looks like a 3/8" comp X 3/8" comp. Stool supply lines have a different fitting on one end. For some reason I can't cut and paste image.
    Hard to tell from the images, but they are 1/2 comp, minus the ring and nut, and the hoses are 1/2 npt on both sides. I pulled the image from HD, what I have is actually actually sweated onto the copper pipe. Again, it's all going once I get the tile down and the vanity in. The 3 I picked up are actually 3/8 compression shark bite (quick connect) 1/4 turn ball valves, they were only $1 more than the threaded or solder types.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    I just completed a valve addition job in my kitchen last week. I bought one of those valves. They are either 1/2" or 3/8" brass fit thread labeled as "FIP" at the incoming side and 3/8" outside diameter compression thread at the output side. Those 2 threads have different spacing. You have to make sure the existing supply pipe thread is compatible.
    Not sure what you are getting at but for the record, NPT (National Pipe Taper) threads are the same as FIP .
    Some confusion may result from the use of NPT, FPT, and MPT in describing threads. Both FPT and MPT are NPT threads, with FPT meaning female threads (internal) and MPT meaning male threads (external).
    I believe FIP stands for Female Iron Pipe
    Last edited by Birddog; 04-04-2018 at 09:25 AM.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Birddog View Post
    Not sure what you are getting at but for the record, NPT (National Pipe Taper) threads are the same as FIP .
    I believe FIP stands for Female Iron Pipe
    What I'm getting at is that NPT/FIP threads aren't compatible with compression threads. "FIP" is what is shown on the box of those valves I bought.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine View Post
    After my lunch break, just had a few more minutes of chiseling before the toilet began to budge finally. Didn't think I'd be able to move it myself, but some stubborn patience did the trick.

    And now, the moment of truth! Behold.......Attachment 322288

    I'm very pleased with myself, though this is only the halfway point. No sewer gas stench, oddly enough. I may have chiseled out part of the toilet itself, but don't want to tip over the toilet trying to see the bottom.
    Late to the thread and kicking myself. The one time there's finally a toilet flange thread RBR, I miss it by a whole day.

    Anyway, I read the whole thread and I didn't see mention of what I see in this pic.



    I'm not seeing a flange there. I'm seeing what looks like the remains of an ancient flange, possibly put there by the Romans who built your villa in 26 BC.

    I see what looks like the top of a soil pipe that needs a brand new flange installed, before a wax ring.


    If you've already done that, please disregard this post.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by SPlKE View Post
    Late to the thread and kicking myself. The one time there's finally a toilet flange thread RBR, I miss it by a whole day.
    I'm not seeing a flange there. I'm seeing what looks like the remains of an ancient flange, possibly put there by the Romans who built your villa in 26 BC.

    I see what looks like the top of a soil pipe that needs a brand new flange installed, before a wax ring.


    If you've already done that, please disregard this post.
    I had thought she had removed the closet flange already. There are quite a few different types of flanges that are retrofit for cast iron drain pipe.
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    I had thought she had removed the closet flange already. There are quite a few different types of flanges that are retrofit for cast iron drain pipe.
    You're a closet flange.

    I showed up late to this thread. I may have skimmed over some important previous posts. But that never stopped me before from pontificating.


  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by SPlKE View Post
    You're a closet flange.

    Nuh uh.....I came out of the flange closet a long time ago

    Oh..... Wait. Huh?
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    Nuh uh.....I came out of the flange closet a long time ago

    Oh..... Wait. Huh?
    I am, however, a basket case.
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  9. #59
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    Back on topic
    Last edited by Eretz; 04-05-2018 at 02:34 AM.
    In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
    Ben Franklin -Tis curious and amazing to observe how distinct and independent of each other the rattles of this animal are, and yet how firmly they are united together
    -


  10. #60
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    I wanted to run downstairs and grab my phone for some after photos, but John doesn't seem to think a job is being taken seriously if somebody's taking pictures

    Today I brushed/vacuumed/scrubbed clean the floor, chiseled* out what little remained in the flange, and then John helped put the toilet on the floor so I could scrape out the wax from the bottom. Also chiseled out some extra plaster from the bottom.

    The Romans who built the house used a bronze flange that was still solidly bolted in (though with a vintage patina) so that remains. John put in the bolts, then the ring, gently seated the toilet (while grumbling about how I messed up his overflow-tube-spout install, which I say he overtightened to begin with.)

    After positioning over the screws, I mixed up the plaster and we quickly spread that around the base. Reconnected, filled, flushed............seems good to go! Now I'm wondering about all the new fancy wax alternatives. Neoprene eh? Hmmm.

    *Apparently, there are different types of chisels, and I happened to use wood chisels.

    Here's a lousy shot of the bathroom, minus the shower stall.

    toilet flange replacement-0403181450.jpg

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine View Post
    Here's a lousy shot of the bathroom, minus the shower stall.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	0403181450.jpg 
Views:	34 
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ID:	322307
    The throne has officially been overtaken by a new ruler.
    Last edited by Eretz; 04-04-2018 at 07:56 PM.
    In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
    Ben Franklin -Tis curious and amazing to observe how distinct and independent of each other the rattles of this animal are, and yet how firmly they are united together
    -


  12. #62
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    Congrats, Christine.

    Now make your lackadaisical helper John whip up a high fiber dinner, and wash it down with lots of beer, so you can fully 'pressure test' your handiwork.

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by SPlKE View Post
    Congrats, Christine.

    Now make your lackadaisical helper John whip up a high fiber dinner, and wash it down with lots of beer, so you can fully 'pressure test' your handiwork.
    Noooooo! Not yet!
    I lost my phone number. Can I have yours?

  14. #64
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    Had a migraine all weekend, so I feel somewhat responsible for maintaining this thing. It'll get a good workout during the next one, which might not be for another 6 weeks. In any case, not sure how to tell if it's the wax ring or faulty piping that's causing the leak. Guess it's necessary to bust open the kitchen ceiling to figure that out?

  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    You want the cast iron tub. They hold heat better. Plastic tubs are gross. I remodeled a bathroom a few years ago and replaced the old tub with a new, slightly larger cast iron tub. One of the guys bidding on the project said a plastic tub was definitely better. Another guy, the guy I hired, laughed when I said that and told me 'the guy doesn't want to haul an iron tub up the stairs'.
    We have never used the tub! Hence, the thread from a while back about tubs vs walk-in showers, taking into consideration that there's only one master bathroom.

    I'd love to give away the tub, but I can't even figure out how they got it upstairs in the first place, let alone inside the house! Have considered keeping it, but the pipes might need to be replaced anyway. The edge of the tub is comfortable for sitting, I would miss that.

  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by SPlKE View Post
    Late to the thread and kicking myself. The one time there's finally a toilet flange thread RBR, I miss it by a whole day.

    Anyway, I read the whole thread and I didn't see mention of what I see in this pic.



    I'm not seeing a flange there. I'm seeing what looks like the remains of an ancient flange, possibly put there by the Romans who built your villa in 26 BC.

    I see what looks like the top of a soil pipe that needs a brand new flange installed, before a wax ring.
    The pipes will be the next project, I suspect. The wax ring needed to be replaced anyway, and I'm hoping that's the actual source of the leak that's staining the kitchen ceiling (directly under the flange). John thinks it's faulty pipes that all require replacement. We shall see.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine View Post
    The pipes will be the next project, I suspect. The wax ring needed to be replaced anyway, and I'm hoping that's the actual source of the leak that's staining the kitchen ceiling (directly under the flange). John thinks it's faulty pipes that all require replacement. We shall see.
    Well, it never hurts to bust some holes in your walls to inspect the pipes.

    I'd start with a Plumb 16 oz rippers hammer, then move to a sawzall to fully expose the pipes.

    You might have to chop up some flooring, and maybe bust up some concrete in your basement.

    T0G can give you guidance there.

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine View Post
    The Romans who built the house used a bronze flange
    It may go further than Roman era. Possibly bronze age.

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine View Post
    We have never used the tub! Hence, the thread from a while back about tubs vs walk-in showers, taking into consideration that there's only one master bathroom.

    I'd love to give away the tub, but I can't even figure out how they got it upstairs in the first place, let alone inside the house! Have considered keeping it, but the pipes might need to be replaced anyway. The edge of the tub is comfortable for sitting, I would miss that.
    Congrats on the toilet replacement. I coached a neighbor down the street to do his own (they are a little financially distressed) and he did great.

    The tub usually gets hauled upstairs and set even before the (I assume) plastering was done, and we're still doing it that way. Got to watch out for heathenish workman who will think nothing of ripping the protective covering off for whatever they need the cardboard for, or just standing in it with their boots on for the hell of it.

    I think that as long as the house has one tub, you're good. All the studies show that tubs get used for dogs, babies and the occasional project--not for people. And it would be easier than trying to get a new tub upstairs (and it would probably have to be plastic, or an army of laborers to wrestle a cast one up there).

    As far as pipe--if it is cast it is lifetime pipe (unless it is stressed by some serious settling. Copper, pretty much the same, although the new treated water is eating copper supply lines pretty fast. Copper waste lines--they will get eaten away if the stinky stuff sits on them (I have one point of failure that I still need to repair...) Galvanized water pipe (if you have that)--also will fail eventually, although the signs of rust would be obvious when you turned on your taps if they have not been used for a while...
    Last edited by paredown; 04-05-2018 at 04:43 AM.
    "A man is judged by the company he keeps, and a company is judged by the men it keeps, and the people of Democratic nations are judged by the type and caliber of officers they elect."
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  20. #70
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    We have a slop sink in the basement, perfect for washing pets and even kids! (seriously, don't see why not ) It took years to convince John to stop worrying about resale value re: tub, and to think about spending the money to make ourselves happy. Houses have gone way up in value here anyway.

    The cast-iron drainpipe had a rare crack that John patched up for now. Water from the tub tap runs brown, so that's probably rusted-out galvanized. I believe a shower drain can be installed that would easily allow conversion to a tub if the new owners want.

  21. #71
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    As far as pipe--if it is cast it is lifetime pipe (unless it is stressed by some serious settling.
    That is not necessarily true. Cast iron is a ferrous material and can rust and corrode. The thickness of the material is the main barrier to failure. Cast iron in contact with the soil is where most failures occur, but it can happen anywhere. Some soils seem to react more negatively than others. There is no perfect material, but I'd prefer properly installed PVC or ABS to anything metallic or God forbid, Orangeburg or Clay tile.

  22. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Birddog View Post
    That is not necessarily true. Cast iron is a ferrous material and can rust and corrode. The thickness of the material is the main barrier to failure. Cast iron in contact with the soil is where most failures occur, but it can happen anywhere. Some soils seem to react more negatively than others. There is no perfect material, but I'd prefer properly installed PVC or ABS to anything metallic or God forbid, Orangeburg or Clay tile.
    Jeez--I forgot about failures where the cast hits the dirt--and we had to redo a hookup on a basement bathroom just a couple of years ago--a right mess too, since the original plumber did the hookup using random pieces from his truck... It's never fun breaking apart someone's cement floor in a finished space.

    The failure of copper water piping from water treatment is because of the use of chloramines--I couldn't remember the details, but here's a CA article:
    https://www.wwdmag.com/contaminants/...r-pipe-systems
    "A man is judged by the company he keeps, and a company is judged by the men it keeps, and the people of Democratic nations are judged by the type and caliber of officers they elect."
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  23. #73
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    One thing for sure, cast iron is SOOOOOOOO much quieter than pvc when it comes to "drain sounds"
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    One thing for sure, cast iron is SOOOOOOOO much quieter than pvc when it comes to "drain sounds"
    Yep...as I sit here in my office at work, right below a guest room, with PVC pipe coming down from the ceiling.
    I lost my phone number. Can I have yours?

  25. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    One thing for sure, cast iron is SOOOOOOOO much quieter than pvc when it comes to "drain sounds"
    PVC pipes can be wrapped with sound insulating material if that's critical.

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