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Thread: Lynskey R150

  1. #1
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    Lynskey R150

    I just purchased this R150 and thought it would be until March until my first ride but was able to get out thanks to El Nino and 50+ degree weather in North Central Ohio.

    Lynskey's craftsman/woman ship is excellent From the Satin finish, etched graphics, to the detail of the welds and to the dimensions/proportion of the frame. Top shelf stuff.

    The R150 is straight gauge Ti but Lynskey still manipulates the tubes as you can see with the bottom bracket photo.

    This is an XL with 35mm of spacers on the Enve fork which gives me about 6cm of saddle to handlebar drop

    Several things I noticed on my first ride was that the contact points work for me and the geometry works for me. I have been riding a cross bike the last several years and was automatically able to ride without my hands on the handlebar. It was not twitchy and very stable. For first ride, I liked it.

    I'll post more info later.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Lynskey R150-img_5474-640x427-.jpg   Lynskey R150-img_5477-640x427-.jpg   Lynskey R150-img_5478-640x427-.jpg   Lynskey R150-img_5479-640x427-2-.jpg   Lynskey R150-img_5480-640x427-.jpg  

    Lynskey R150-img_5481-640x427-2-.jpg   Lynskey R150-img_5484-640x427-.jpg  
    There is a fine line between a hobby and mental illness.

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    I wanted to post some photos of tire clearance. I am running Schwalbe Ultra Remo ZX 28mm. Good clearance in the rear and front. I ride a lot of chip/seal and rough blacktop so I have always like riding 28mm tires. The Lynskey rides just as well as my Trek Cronus CX. They are different rides; both good but different and not sure I can articulate.

    One thing I have noticed is that the Lynskey is quieter because the carbon could be noisy due to internal cable routing when I hit bumps. My Reynolds Solitude rear hub was noisy like a Chris King hub. The Vision Team 25 don't have that noise and I really really like not having the noise. I know they are budget wheels but they are solid. Longevity will be the test. I took the cheap looking decals off (with hairdryer) and they look nice.

    I like going back to caliper brakes (vs Mini V) and I am not sure why you would want disc brakes unless you rode a lot in wet weather or was touring. I have read the pros/cons but I rode behind a bike with disc brakes and they were noisy.

    The FSA stem/handlebar is nice and I like the flat section of handlebars along with the short drop/reach.

    Not a big fan of the FSA Gossamer crank as far as looks but I have no performance complaints

    My 105 10 speed works well on my other bike but there is a noticeable difference with 105 11 speed. The shifts are more precise vs the 10 speed vague shift. Reminds me of my buddy's Campy but only the 105 11 speed is easier to shift.

    Overall: No regrets on the purchase. I believe it will still be a fun bike to ride even after the newness wears off. Glad I could support an American company.
    There is a fine line between a hobby and mental illness.

  3. #3
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    Here are the photos.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Lynskey R150-img_5491-640x427-.jpg   Lynskey R150-img_5495-640x427-.jpg   Lynskey R150-img_5500-640x427-.jpg   Lynskey R150-img_5501-427x640-.jpg   Lynskey R150-img_5503-427x640-.jpg  

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  4. #4
    CMP
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    Thanks for posting this. I'm unable to find almost any information on the Lynskey R150 on line. Now that you've had it a while, what are your impressions of the ride? Stiffness? Comfort? Appreciate any input you can give.

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    It has been an unusual winter for me because I have been able to put around 120 miles on the Lynskey. In years past, I would have zero miles. I have ridden steel(Ox Platinum & Reynolds) , aluminum, aluminum/carbon, carbon and Ti. Material matters but not the deciding factor. I have ridden a poorly designed custom steel bike that rode terribly and a stock Trek aluminum that rode great.

    I am not sure I can articulate the R150 ride? I have done a mixture of potholes, chip/seal, windy, wet and hilly. The geometry is not slow like my Trek Cronus CX but still stable. Handles chip/seal similar to my past Gunnar Roadie. It has a good road feel if that makes any sense. My thoughts on stiffness is purely subjective because I am not a "masher" on the pedals. I will just say it is efficient when pedaling hard up hills.

    I was going to keep my Trek Cronus CX but have decided to pair it down to the Lynskey R150 since the R150 is a good all around bike.
    There is a fine line between a hobby and mental illness.

  6. #6
    CMP
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    Good information. Thanks. I'm struggling with the choice between the R150 with 105 build direct from Lynskey and the Moto LeChamp Ti with Ultegra at about the same price. Parts vs frame.

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    I have always struggled with the parts vs frame decision. I can say the 105 11 speed is more than I will ever need. I bet Lynskey would work with you on a 105 crankset. The Moto LeChamp Ti has non Shimano brakes and FSA crank. Their geometry never worked with me due to short headtube. Comparing the Lynskey with traditional headtube of 207.5 plus 28 headset stack, you are about 50mm shorter on the Moto which is integrated. That is a low position even with a long steerer tube. Looks like more of a racing geometry. Depends on your preference.

    For me, it came down to supporting an American company. Lynskey has a good story from the beginning to now. Must be a good company to work for because they have a lot of long term employees (besides their family members).
    There is a fine line between a hobby and mental illness.

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    The Moto "SL" model I'm considering (at $2200, same base price as the 105 Lynskey) has full Ultegra 6800, including the crank set and brakes (the version with FSA cranks and Tektro brakes is $1900). That is an awfully temping deal: a similar build at Adrenaline Bikes on the Lynskey frame (with comparable wheel upgrade) is nearly $1k more.

    The geometry of the Moto is a bit more aggressive than the Lynskey--somewhere between "racing" and "sport" geometry I would say. The Lynskey geometry is preferable, but I may be able to get to a similar place on the Moto with stem adjustments.

    "Made in the USA" is a draw, although I have to confess that I haven't owned an American made car, well ever.

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    Lynskey R150-lyn.jpg
    I purchased a R-150 frame from Lynskey in December. Got a "free" paint job for the holiday season sales specials. I love the panels so I went with the black and white. Just finished moving my Shimano 105 10 speed compact group set over. I'll post something after I ride it for a bit. My last frame was a Jamis Satellite that was a sweet smooth ride.

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    Good choice on the panels and color. That is not a color/panel combo that you will get tired of. The paint "special" is what got me going to the Lynskey website. When they ran a special on complete bikes I jumped on it. It is one of few spur of the moment purchases that turned out better than expected.

    I had an issue with Lynskey's website in regards to the parts listed on the website vs what was shipped. I gave them a call and traded some emails and got everything resolved. They were great to work with.
    There is a fine line between a hobby and mental illness.

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    very nice congratz! I like the cool effect of etching on matte finish too

    just ordered my 3rd Lynskey today too. An R150 with the S&S couplers, and travel case. industrial mill finish though - I like the 'rub with WD40 trick' for making them look new in this finish.

    I hope it climbs well enough to replace my old old Tarmac, hopefully stiffer in the BB area. OK I don't expect it to match the Tarmac, but I hope it does not have a dead slug feel like my CooperCX does on rolling hill climbs. (Cooper is heavy at 26 lbs, I will build this R150 to under 20 lbs) And yet I look forward to a more comfy ride for long days and rougher roads, compared to the plastic race bike.
    Last edited by BCSaltchucker; 05-08-2016 at 02:25 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post

    just ordered my 3rd Lynskey today too. An R150 with the S&S couplers, and travel case. industrial mill finish though - I like the 'rub with WD40 trick' for making them look new in this finish.

    .
    Any photos or links of the R150 with S&S couplers?
    There is a fine line between a hobby and mental illness.

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    Just saw your post under the other Lynskey heading.
    There is a fine line between a hobby and mental illness.

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    Anyone on here know if the frame only will come with a seatpost collar? Mine is being delivered next week, but I don't want to be surprised missing something...

  15. #15
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    You will receive a seatpost collar. No surprises.
    There is a fine line between a hobby and mental illness.

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    Red face Time for an update.

    Quote Originally Posted by lobooho View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I purchased a R-150 frame from Lynskey in December. Got a "free" paint job for the holiday season sales specials. I love the panels so I went with the black and white. Just finished moving my Shimano 105 10 speed compact group set over. I'll post something after I ride it for a bit. My last frame was a Jamis Satellite that was a sweet smooth ride.
    This bicycle frame is perfect.
    Straight gauge titanium tubes.
    Those '90's frame makers/designers got it right.
    Smooth and comfortable.
    Timeless. Forever.
    I've stopped yearning for other bicycle frames.
    The cool kids may smirk at my old school bicycle.
    Like I even care.
    I enjoy riding this bicycle a lot.
    Isn't that what its all about?

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    Those both look great!

    I'm considering a Lynskey titanium bike, but not sure which one. I'm mainly a recreational rider, mainly riding flat roads and not more than 40 miles at a time. I'm a big guy (280lbs), so I'm wondering if the R150 would be too flexy. I'm looking at the R240 and the R265 too.
    Any advice?

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    I am a recreational rider also however I only weigh 170 lbs. I don't notice any flex when I jump on it out of a stop sign. I think the real flexy titanium tubes were on the bikes manufactured in the '80s.
    Here's some additional discussion (Titanium frame flex - Bike Forums).

    The people at Lynskey can better point you to the best frame for you.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by burgrat View Post
    Those both look great!

    I'm considering a Lynskey titanium bike, but not sure which one. I'm mainly a recreational rider, mainly riding flat roads and not more than 40 miles at a time. I'm a big guy (280lbs), so I'm wondering if the R150 would be too flexy. I'm looking at the R240 and the R265 too.
    Any advice?
    Call Lynskey. They would know better than anyone. Actually, live chat them during the week
    There is a fine line between a hobby and mental illness.

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    For what its worth, I had a similar chat with Lynskey last week. I am 6'4" 215 and they recommended the R240 over the R150. I liked the more classic tube profles of the R150, though, and don't plan to do any racing on it. I did some digging around online and found a few accounts of clydes on 150s without any complaints of flex. Based on my previous experiences with different road bikes (granted, no Ti) I decided to just go for the 150.

    Unfortunately, I won't have any ride reports for a few months while I collect parts for the build but I'll do my best to remember to update once I do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffcon0 View Post
    For what its worth, I had a similar chat with Lynskey last week. I am 6'4" 215 and they recommended the R240 over the R150. I liked the more classic tube profles of the R150, though, and don't plan to do any racing on it. I did some digging around online and found a few accounts of clydes on 150s without any complaints of flex. Based on my previous experiences with different road bikes (granted, no Ti) I decided to just go for the 150.

    Unfortunately, I won't have any ride reports for a few months while I collect parts for the build but I'll do my best to remember to update once I do.
    Thank you for the info. I'll look forward to your feedback. Where parts/group are you using to do the build?

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    Quote Originally Posted by burgrat View Post
    Thank you for the info. I'll look forward to your feedback. Where parts/group are you using to do the build?
    That's still in flux a bit depending on what sort of deals I can hunt down. This is going to be a winter project and I'll be collecting parts over the next month or two. I've always ridden single speed in one form or another (BMX, single speed city bike/commuter, SS 29'er). This will be my first "proper" road bike and I'll be looking to use it on training rides, weekend club rides, and hoping to get up to a century by end of summer. Basically an all around-er.

    As for the build up:
    Thinking of a Campy group. Maybe the new Potenza if I can find a deal, Veloce if I decide to be budget conscious. I keep waffling on forks. I'm strangely fond of the Wound Up but think Enve would offer better clearance if I want to squeeze a 28mm on for some gravel. As a bigger dude I'll probably get a bulkier 32 or 36 hole wheelset since we have some rough roads up here in VT. Maybe Open Pros, Archetypes, or Dyads.

    The rest remains to be seen. I'd like to keep it looking sleek and classic with comfort in mind.

    I actually just received the frame last night and it looks great. Welds are nice and clean with that "stack of dimes" look that is sought after on Ti. The downtube is actually wider than the pictures let on with some amount of "ovalizing" that seems similar to the R240 and should add some stiffness. It all looks quite sturdy to me but the ride will tell the story. It really looks even better in person than in photos. I'm very pleased.

    Weight (with some bubble wrap still attached) is ~1700g. I'll report back once I start building it up. This thread was very helpful with my decision so I hope to contribute!

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    Hi,

    My R150LE L size is making tick tick noise when pedaling, I'm not quite sure where the sound is coming from.
    Does anyone knows which type of Bottom Bracket the bike came with? I think it's BB30 with 68mm in width, I'd like the tool to dismount the cranks and then the BB shell to clean and relube, retighten.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GarzaAlfredo View Post
    Hi,

    My R150LE L size is making tick tick noise when pedaling, I'm not quite sure where the sound is coming from.
    Does anyone knows which type of Bottom Bracket the bike came with? I think it's BB30 with 68mm in width, I'd like the tool to dismount the cranks and then the BB shell to clean and relube, retighten.
    If you don't know and can't tell what kind of crank and BB you have just by looking at it, you are probably better off not screwing with it. It is possible to overtighten the cranks and BB, and you don't even know if they are the issue.

    Go to a decent shop. It is unlikely to be an expensive fix, and they can educate you about your bike and what tools are required.
    Get a better saddle: www.kontactbike.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by GarzaAlfredo View Post
    Hi,

    My R150LE L size is making tick tick noise when pedaling, I'm not quite sure where the sound is coming from.
    Does anyone knows which type of Bottom Bracket the bike came with? I think it's BB30 with 68mm in width, I'd like the tool to dismount the cranks and then the BB shell to clean and relube, retighten.
    I'm pretty certain that your bike has a standard 68mm threaded BB. So something like this:

    Shimano BBR60 Ultegra Bottom Bracket | Jenson USA

    You'll need a $15 Shimano BB wrench to get the current one out (JensonUSA Shimano Style BB Tool | Jenson USA or similar) , as well as other tools to remove the crankset, depending on brand (Shimano need this: Shimano TL-FC16 Crankset Arm Tool | Jenson USA).

    Also check your pedals. They could be loose or could need a bit of grease on the threads. Or the saddle, or seat post, or stem, or a back wheel skewer that's not tight enough, or a loose cassette lockring, or... ticks when pedaling can come from totally unexpected places. It's a fun thing to track down.

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