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  1. #1
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    American Classic Aero 3, Mavic SLS or custom?

    So I treated myself to a new Bianchi Infinto. First road bike upgrading from a hybrid. Looking to upgrade wheels from the Fulcrum 7 that came with the bike. The Fulcrums are a little porky at 1849 grams. I'm looking for a lighter wheel, good for climbing, able to handle less than perfect pavement. I do a lot of climbing here in New Hampshire. In fact not too many long stretches before hitting some sort of hill. At this point no racing only recreational rides. In season I was averaging 2 commutes / week (14 miles round trip). Weekend rides average 25 miles but hoping to do longer rides. I weigh 200 lbs currently but have lost 15 lbs and plan on losing another 15-20 lbs this coming season. My LBS recommended Mavic Kysrium SLS because he rides them himself and sells a lot locally and feels they hold up really well to rough roads around here. I also would like some style to the wheels and like the looks of the American Classic 420 aero 3 in white. My budget is around $1000 or less. I've done a ton searches on these two choices and custom wheels but honestly a little overwhelmed. No experience with custom wheels or even what to look for? Can someone build a custom wheel for that range or less with some style (white rims, or hubs, graphics?) Are custom a better value than factory wheel sets ?
    Last edited by Tspeters; 02-05-2013 at 04:09 PM.

  2. #2
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    The Ksyriums that your shop recommended will leave you stuck with a wheelset that is comprised entirely of proprietary parts. When something breaks, your going to be out of a wheelset for a few weeks while your shop hops in line for a Mavic warranty claim.
    With that said, you could build much lighter than the Fulcrum or Mavic.
    You could go with Kinlin XR270 rims and lace them to Tune Mig 70/Mag 170 hubs (both of which come in white). That would be a solid all around wheelset that could definitely take some abuse.

    That would be under 1400 grams within your price range.

  3. #3
    Domestic Drivin' E-Thug
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    Zen won't toot his own horn, but that doesn't mean that others can't. You should really check out his website. Admittedly, I went with a slightly cheaper option than what he offers when I recently purchased wheels, but he really offers some gorgeous, quality wheels that, for the price, seem like a much better bargain than American Classics, a wheelset that I have owned twice in the past.

    Quote Originally Posted by Zen Cyclery View Post
    The Ksyriums that your shop recommended will leave you stuck with a wheelset that is comprised entirely of proprietary parts. When something breaks, your going to be out of a wheelset for a few weeks while your shop hops in line for a Mavic warranty claim.
    With that said, you could build much lighter than the Fulcrum or Mavic.
    You could go with Kinlin XR270 rims and lace them to Tune Mig 70/Mag 170 hubs (both of which come in white). That would be a solid all around wheelset that could definitely take some abuse.

    That would be under 1400 grams within your price range.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the feedback. I took a look at Zen's website..very nice! I am still trying to learn about components. Are the Kimlin XR270 27mm deep? The description says a lighter version of the XR300 which is 30mm. Just making an assumption. I liked the looks of the AC Areo 3 but at 34mm they do look a little deep for my needs. Less deep is OK. What makes a good climbing wheel? Something light so they spin up easy? Does the lightness affect the decent speed or compromise handling?

  5. #5
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    Thanks for taking a peek at our site!

    The XR270 is 27mm deep. It is a relatively versatile rim, and is only $55 per hoop.

    With regards to your question about a climbing wheel, here is my take. A climbing wheelset will benefit from running a lighter rim. Not because it will make you faster necessarily, but because it will provide a more responsive feel upon acceleration. With that said, going with too light of a rim can start to give the wheels a twitchy ride quality which is something that I really dont like, all though some would disagree.

    All in all, I really think its really about finding a solid middleground. A rim that is relatively light, yet still will give you some aero capabilities when you need them.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zen Cyclery View Post
    Thanks for taking a peek at our site!

    The XR270 is 27mm deep. It is a relatively versatile rim, and is only $55 per hoop.

    With regards to your question about a climbing wheel, here is my take. A climbing wheelset will benefit from running a lighter rim. Not because it will make you faster necessarily, but because it will provide a more responsive feel upon acceleration. With that said, going with too light of a rim can start to give the wheels a twitchy ride quality which is something that I really dont like, all though some would disagree.

    All in all, I really think its really about finding a solid middleground. A rim that is relatively light, yet still will give you some aero capabilities when you need them.
    How are the Tune Mig 70/Mag 170 hubs to service? Do they use cartridge bearings? Any advantage to consider ceramic bearings over SS?

  7. #7
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    The Tunes are relatively easy to pull apart, but they are no where near like a White Industries or King.
    I wouldn't recommend going with ceramic bearings though. They have advantages, none of which would ever be utilized on a bicycle. That is, unless Edgar is powering you along making you spin at 1,000,000 rpms.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zen Cyclery View Post
    The Tunes are relatively easy to pull apart, but they are no where near like a White Industries or King.
    No way near in what way?

  9. #9
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    Sorry I should have clarified. They are relatively simple to open up. Replacing parts is a different story though.

  10. #10
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    Get the aero 3s

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zen Cyclery View Post
    Sorry I should have clarified. They are relatively simple to open up. Replacing parts is a different story though.
    So from a serviceablility point of view are Kings or White hubs a better choice even though a small weight penalty disadvantage. If you as a pro builder say replacing parts is difficult how much of a challenge would it be for a mechanically inclined lay person to service the Tunes?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warpdatframe View Post
    Get the aero 3s
    A little more info please. Why would the AC Aero 3 be a better choice over Mavic or custom? Price, performance, reliability, serviceability, looks?

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