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  1. #1
    kma
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    Gran Premio Inferno Project

    My winter project is done. Just finished dialing in my Gran Premio Inferno. I swapped out a few parts and installed some of them on my Surly Travelers Check SS and selling the rest (Mavic wheels, Sram 172.5 cranks & brakes). I installed a lighter Revolution wheelset, Zipp bars, KCNC brakes, Easton seatpost, and Bebop pedals. Matching honey colored Brooks swallow saddle and bar tape. I treated the frame and fork tubes with frame-saver spray. My 54cm frame is 4 lbs 4 ounces and the fork is 2 lbs even. The whole bike now comes in at exactly 18 lbs. I can make it lighter with a Ritchey carbon fork and wcs stem, but Iím happy now the way itís setup. I still havenít had the chance to go for good long ride as XC Skiing has taken priority with all the snow we're getting. I think some retro Velo-Orange water bottle cages might look nice on the bike. Looking forward to spring time and getting some road miles in.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Gran Premio Inferno Project-motobecane5.jpg  

  2. #2
    kma
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    Iíve spent some time on my new bike so here is my review/feedback ...

    PROS

    Iím comparing this bike to my old Titanium Campy Record bike which was about the same size but with slightly milder head/seat tube angles (72/73.5) and a lower bb.

    First off, I wanted a steel bike with a classy retro look, clean and understated, and a pimped out parts package. That I accomplished easily with this bike though I did swap some parts out. Love the skinny frame tubes and traditional straight top tube. The lugs give a nice clean look to the frame/fork. This bike definitely stands out in a crowd of bikes that are mostly big tubed, hydroformed, shaped, carbon this and that. My favorite honey colored Brooks swallow saddle and matching tape complements the look just right.

    The Ride: Itís definitely a lot more nimble than my old bike. I like the quicker handling on the climbs. Especially when Iím shifting around on the bike and going from seated to standing. At first, it was a bit sketchier riding down some of the same mountains I use to blaze down on my old bike. However, Iíve gotten use the bike and ride downhills in the drops more. I also ride with my bars higher this year which has attributed to some of the handling changes. Overall, the bike feels smoother on rough roads than my old Ti bike.

    Wheels: immediately sold the Mavic Ksyrium Elites on ebay and replaced with Revolution Wheel Works Rev-22ís. I wanted a sub 1400 gram all around wheel set. Nothing wrong with the Mavics. I use to own a pair of Mavic Ksyrium SLís and they were super strong, stiff, and never needed truing. My new Rev-22ís are very light and great for climbing. Not as stiff as my old Mavicís which could also attribute the smooth feel of the bike.

    SRAM Red: Lighter than the competition and a bit more affordable to replace. Iíve owned Dura Ace and Record. They all perform and shift nicely when you get to this level. I do miss the flat surface on my previous Campy Record levers. The SRAM 50/34 with 11-28 is great for riding around here in Colorado. I can now ride the Gunnison east portal (5mi, 16% grade) without completely blowing up or stopping.

    CONS

    I donít like the built in cable guides under bottom bracket. Over time, your cables can wear into the paint and frame. Would have preferred a plastic bolt on cable guide. I remedied this by cutting/applying thin strips of frame saver as thatís what I had at the time. A better fix would be a thin plastic/Teflon tube that can be fitted over the cables at this point to avoid wear.

    NEUTRAL

    Handlebar, seatpost, stem, and saddle. Thereís nothing wrong with them, not bad, but just generic. Would be nice to have Ritchey WCS parts as they would either be keepers or have a higher resale value on ebay. Some of these parts are now on my Surly Travelers Check. The Conti UltraRace folding tires are nice and light but a bit puncture prone. I replaced one tire already with a tougher Conti ultra gatorskin tire.

    BOTTOM LINE

    Where else can you buy a brand new bike, with this high end parts spec, and at this price! Itís been a long time since Iíve worked at a bike shop and I donít have the industry connections like I used to. Iíve replaced a few parts, sold some to recoup costs, and spent a little bit more on the bike (as most cyclist do) to customize it. In the end, I still saved $$$$, have exactly what I want, and have a bike I enjoy to ride. Itís a good deal on a good bike.

  3. #3
    Cycling 4 the fun of it.
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    Awesome!

    I would polish the lugs, that would be the icing on the cake. It would take some time to do however, i'm sure it could be done without destroying your paint job.

  4. #4
    kma
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclist69
    Awesome!

    I would polish the lugs, that would be the icing on the cake. It would take some time to do however, i'm sure it could be done without destroying your paint job.
    Yeah, it's tempting. That would look cool. How would you go about this? Start off with a Dremel tool, finish by hand with steel wool, then add a clear coat?

  5. #5
    Cycling 4 the fun of it.
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    Assuming the bike is already dissembled and we are working a frame only.

    First, I would get two rolls of masking tape. You will need two sizes. One small (like a 1/8in or 1/4in) and one standard width. Using the smaller width first, I would apply this as close to the lugs as possible. This should be able to follow the curves of the lugs because of the tapes flexibility. Next, using the standard size tape, I would over lap the first tape a bit for added protection along with the use of paper on all tubing.

    With a small paintbrush, I would apply the paint remover on the lugs and use as instructed on the removers label. Wait time should be around 15-20 minutes before you start removing the paint. The paint remover should take off everythingÖright down to the bare metal. However, more then one application may be necessary.

    Clean up a bit with a an old rag and put some polishing cream in a new rag and start buffing. You could use a Dremel, for the polishing part.

    Last: apply a clear coat, then remove all tape and paper.

    1) Two rolls of masking tape
    2) Small Paintbrush
    3) Paint Remover
    4) Polishing Cream
    5) Paper
    6) Rags or Dremel

  6. #6
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    Nice review...and a nice bike. I got a Premio Pro with Ultegra about a month ago and I'm still dialing it in. I've got the Brooks B17 saddle and matching handlebar leather tape and wider/heavier touring pedals and other junk I carry so I'm probably under 22 lbs but not much. Mine is mostly for personal TT rides, fitness and long day rides. I really like the steel ride and, like you, love the retro look of the skinny tubes. I didn't want carbon and was wrestling with a decision when I saw the Serpens and then the Premio...love at first site with those skinny tubes.
    The conti racing tires are definitely flat prone. I've had a couple of flats so far and will replace them over the winter with Michelin Carbon. I also dislike the stem and handlebars and I'm toying with replacing them with Ritchie silver classic over the winter. I think I'd like the silver stem and handlebar on that bike but have to think it through.
    The Kysrium Elites are light but they seem a little flexy to me. Not sure if its the fork or the wheel. I do take turns a lot tighter and faster now but I have to watch it.
    One other thing I'm thinking about is the color. I have the blue and I like it but I may disassemble it and take it to a shop and have the paint stripped and then custom painted retro colors...possibly painting the lugs a contrasting color....not sure at this point but it's an option.
    Wish I could ride in CO. I've got a 11-28 and I huff and puff at sea level. Can only imagine altitude and serious mountain climbs...
    Good luck

  7. #7
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    nice

    I think it's awesome how you've made the bike your own with the mods. I'm wanting to get back into cycling and love the idea of a nice steel frame. thanks for posting

  8. #8
    microdosed sarcasm
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    Nice.

    I wish my Inferno had come with compact cranks.

  9. #9
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