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  1. #1
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    Windsor Wellington 3.0

    I just bought a Windsor Wellington 3.0 from BikesDirect.
    I'm completely new to the biking scene so I have no idea what's going.

    First, my rear wheel came really warped. I don't know if I should mess with the spokes myself or take it to a LBS and have them tune the whole bike up.

    Second, I was completely confused with the gear shifters. The bike comes with shifters that are integrated with the break levers. The left lever moves up in gear/speed when I pull the break lever towards the right and goes down in gear/speed when push the thumb lever. The right lever does the exact opposite. It goes down in gear/speed when I pull the right break lever towards the left and goes up in gear/speed when I push the thumb lever. Is this normal?

    Sorry if these are newbie Q's. Thanks!

    -Ken

  2. #2
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    Sorry to sound harsh, but why buy a bike online if you know this little about it? It is worth the $'s to work with an LBS so that you can learn, get service, etc. Online purchases can be great for DIY folks, but I never recommend for newbies.

    The levers work the same in the sense that the whole lever is pushed, the chain goes to the larger chainring/cog. It goes to the smaller chainring/cog when you push just the smaller paddle. However, the larger the chainring, the bigger the gear, but the smaller the cog, the bigger the gear. Thus, the two brifters seem to work in opposite ways.

  3. #3
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    I'll venture a guess: because the OP doesn't feel like paying an extra $200 for the same bike from LBS?

    Anyways, My first ride was a Windsor Kennet (full ultegra, frame with CF seatstays).

    Cycling gears are not that hard to work with. You must be an idiot to not eventually figure out how things work. The key is to have lots of patience. I started in the same boat (bought a new bike with zero wrenching experience). I then went to the LBS and bought this book:



    Spend a week reading and take notes on how to put the bike together. You don't need a lot of tools as the bike should come 60% assembled. Good luck building your bike knowledge.


    Quote Originally Posted by DavidsonDuke
    Sorry to sound harsh, but why buy a bike online if you know this little about it? It is worth the $'s to work with an LBS so that you can learn, get service, etc. Online purchases can be great for DIY folks, but I never recommend for newbies.

    The levers work the same in the sense that the whole lever is pushed, the chain goes to the larger chainring/cog. It goes to the smaller chainring/cog when you push just the smaller paddle. However, the larger the chainring, the bigger the gear, but the smaller the cog, the bigger the gear. Thus, the two brifters seem to work in opposite ways.

  4. #4
    duh...
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    take it back to the shop and have them fix the rim and explain the shifters... oh wait, you didn't get it from a shop. call bikesdirect and have them take care of it

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by FatTireFred
    take it back to the shop and have them fix the rim and explain the shifters... oh wait, you didn't get it from a shop. call bikesdirect and have them take care of it
    Well when you orderf orm BD, you do get a bunch of links to help you with any issues like he has.

    But I also feel that newbies who have ZERO knowledge of bikes, should buy their first at a LBS for these reasons. Or be ready to learn. Also having a knowledgeable buddy to help with these minor details helps as well.

    With the money he did save, we can buy tools and books to learn.

    But someone like the OP should have gone to the LBS if he is this much of a newbie.

    I bought my first reral MTB and Road bikes at the LBS years and years ago for these reasons.
    DIRT BOY

    "Pain is a big fat creature riding on your back. The farther you pedal, the heavier he feels. The harder you push, the tighter he squeezes your chest. The steeper the climb, the deeper he digs his jagged, sharp claws into your muscles." - Scott Martin


  6. #6
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    I've built up three road bikes in the past couple of years from frames and parts I got on eBay. I have nothing against trying to save $'s. But the OP is not a candidate for internet bicycle sales.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by areola
    I just bought a Windsor Wellington 3.0 from BikesDirect.
    I'm completely new to the biking scene so I have no idea what's going.

    First, my rear wheel came really warped. I don't know if I should mess with the spokes myself or take it to a LBS and have them tune the whole bike up.
    If you want to just ride your bike and not wrench it yourself (at least not for a while) I would take it to an LBS for truing. The wheel truing shouldn't set you back much $-wise. But if you're willing to go at it yourself, you can get yourself a $5 spoke wrench and visit Park Tool's Repair Help page.
    Quote Originally Posted by areola
    Second, I was completely confused with the gear shifters. The bike comes with shifters that are integrated with the break levers. The left lever moves up in gear/speed when I pull the break lever towards the right and goes down in gear/speed when push the thumb lever. The right lever does the exact opposite. It goes down in gear/speed when I pull the right break lever towards the left and goes up in gear/speed when I push the thumb lever. Is this normal?

    Sorry if these are newbie Q's. Thanks!

    -Ken
    Derailleurs have springs set to pull the derailleur towards the smaller cogs/rings. You counter that tension by pulling the shift levers inwards, thus moving the derailleurs towards the larger cogs/rings. Because the shift mechanism is indexed, you'll hear clicking, which is actually the sound of locking on to the next gears position withing the shift mechanism. The thumb lever releases the locked position allowing the derailleurs spring to move the derailleur towards the smaller cogs/rings.

    My first road bike was a BD bike. I knew that I would have to either pay anywhere from $60-100 per wrenching, and was/am very willing to do all the wrenching myself. I spent just about $250 on a full set of tools and a stand, but that's one time cost that will no doubt pay for itself, and more.

  8. #8
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    Hi Juiceman.
    I took the bike to a LBS for the wheel and tuning.
    They said the wheel itself was pretty warped so they'll try to fix it.
    They're busy so I was told the bike won't be ready until next week.

    What I meant by the gear shifters is this.
    The right side: Pull the break levers inward to move DOWN in gear, and push the thumb lever
    to go UP in gear.
    The left side: Pull the break levers inward to move UP in gear, and push the thumb lever to go
    DOWN in gear.

    Is this normal?

    I just assumed that you pulled the break levers inward to move up in gear and the thumb lever was to go down.

    -Ken

  9. #9
    wim
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    Here are the service instructions on your shifters showing how to operate them. Good reading on a rainy night if you can stay awake . .

    http://techdocs.shimano.com/media/te...9830606920.PDF

  10. #10
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    hello i also recently purchased this bike. I was wondering how much it would cost to swap out the rear derailer with 105? thank you

  11. #11
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    Windsor 3.0

    I purchased this bike last week because I entered a triathlon on a whim and the only bike shop in town didn't have what I was looking for. My bike came from bikes direct on time and required some assembly. It took me zero use of the directions and about fifteen minutes to start riding it. I have never owned a road bike before but to me this is dialed in. I have made no adjustments to the derailers and quickly figured out the integrated brake shifter levers. It shifts great and I only get a little noise from the front guide and chain when I am at an odd gear, like lowest on the front and lowest on the rear or the opposite. Obviously better bikes exist but I am having a lot of fun on this one and after 50 miles I haven't had any problems whatsoever.

  12. #12
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    I'm a newbie with a limited budget. BD seems to have everything I want at a price that is at the limit of what I want to spend. Any opinions on Motobecane Jubilee Trail?

  13. #13
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    Windsor Wellington 3.0

    My Wellington 3 came from BD. Krappy tyres and rims along with a bad seat and a no good chain. New Vuelta XRP Pro rims, Kenda Kaliente Kevlar tyres, Sella Max gel saddle.This thing came with a Fuji Kinesis Aluminum frame, Fuji Kenisis Carbon Forks, Aluminum bars, stem, seat post came with this animal too. What a rocket ship! Rides like a dream. Kicks Holy Ass.

  14. #14
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    If you have any bike co-ops in your area, I'd highly recommend taking your BD bike there instead of the LBS. They'll teach you how to fix it up yourself for a fraction of the price.

  15. #15
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    New Vince, old old old thread. What's next ? They still sell this frame/fork AKA framset and "bike" six years later. How many other make/models can say the same thing ?? I have two of them. One is weenied from the stock 24.0 lbs to 19.2 lbs, including pedals. Better wheels made the biggest difference in weight and ride. Well, other than adjusting the pressure in the tires for effect
    Only the dead shall know the end of war.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by skitorski View Post
    New Vince, old old old thread. What's next ? They still sell this frame/fork AKA framset and "bike" six years later. How many other make/models can say the same thing ?? I have two of them. One is weenied from the stock 24.0 lbs to 19.2 lbs, including pedals. Better wheels made the biggest difference in weight and ride. Well, other than adjusting the pressure in the tires for effect
    I have this bike as well and with a year of riding under my belt I was thinking about upgrading it. What wheels did you buy? Did you upgrade your components also? Sorry for commenting on this old thread.

  17. #17
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    You'd be better served buying a new bike with fully integrated brifters, instead of the thumb shifters. I've rode the 3.0 as a quick errand bike the last few weeks and that's probably the biggest complaint I've had (vs. my CF main bike).

    Without hunting for deals, upgrading a bike with individual components is going to be a money sink.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aravilar View Post
    You'd be better served buying a new bike with fully integrated brifters, instead of the thumb shifters. I've rode the 3.0 as a quick errand bike the last few weeks and that's probably the biggest complaint I've had (vs. my CF main bike).

    Without hunting for deals, upgrading a bike with individual components is going to be a money sink.
    Thanks for the advice. I was thinking more about the wheels than the components. How does the frame stack up against mid-level bikes? Is it just the components and wheel weight that is holding this bike back, or is the frame just not that great?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pedal View Post
    Thanks for the advice. I was thinking more about the wheels than the components. How does the frame stack up against mid-level bikes? Is it just the components and wheel weight that is holding this bike back, or is the frame just not that great?
    The frame is fine; my old bike was the Bristol with the same frame but slightly better components. It is fairly heavy though, and compared to a CAAD10 or other highly engineered ALU frame, it's at a disadvantage.

    That said, depending on whether you're looking for climbing performance (which is weight-oriented) or aerodynamic performance (more on drag reduction), you will end up paying a lot for relatively little.

    When I upgraded, I did so more for ride quality and stability, and "quality of life" than pure weight. The biggest performance upgrade I noticed going to my new bike was actually downhill (because the ride was more stable and I had more confidence in the brakes).

    All the 3.0 components are "heavy" and not super high performance. You can upgrade what you want but I personally don't think it would be cost-effective. If you REALLY want the weight savings, I would just save to buy a new bike at a level you're comfortable with rather than constantly upgrading.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aravilar View Post

    All the 3.0 components are "heavy" and not super high performance. You can upgrade what you want but I personally don't think it would be cost-effective. If you REALLY want the weight savings, I would just save to buy a new bike at a level you're comfortable with rather than constantly upgrading.
    you can say that about any other entry level bike when you're starting at 2200/2300/Claris level components, compared to higher end bikes with higher end (and lighter) compoinents.
    2010 Specialized Secteur Elite upgraded with 32T cassette and does not have Stan's (yet)
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp 29er upgraded with 36T cassette and Stan's Arch EX rims and tubeless. Considering a 1x10 upgrade
    2013 Cannondale CAADX-6 Tiagra upgraded to 32T cassette and Stan's Alpha 400 rims and tubeless
    2008/2009 Burton T6 156cm with Burton Triad Bindings & DC Judge boots

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pedal View Post
    Thanks for the advice. I was thinking more about the wheels than the components. How does the frame stack up against mid-level bikes? Is it just the components and wheel weight that is holding this bike back, or is the frame just not that great?
    The Windsor Wellington frame is made by Kinesis (unless they've changed recently). I can buy them new for about $25. You know the aluminum that lawn furniture is made from? Yeah....
    Other countries need to stop hatin' or we'll unfriend them. - Christine

    Apparently I left my reading comprehension glasses in my ass. - DrRoebuck

    Still, it felt great and I felt like I was sitting on some kind of vibrator -Touch0Gray

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    The Windsor Wellington frame is made by Kinesis (unless they've changed recently). I can buy them new for about $25. You know the aluminum that lawn furniture is made from? Yeah....
    I'm sure you're a material sciences expert. Or just another idiot troll.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    The Windsor Wellington frame is made by Kinesis (unless they've changed recently). I can buy them new for about $25. You know the aluminum that lawn furniture is made from? Yeah....
    The fork is Kinesis also, iirc.
    2010 Specialized Secteur Elite upgraded with 32T cassette and does not have Stan's (yet)
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp 29er upgraded with 36T cassette and Stan's Arch EX rims and tubeless. Considering a 1x10 upgrade
    2013 Cannondale CAADX-6 Tiagra upgraded to 32T cassette and Stan's Alpha 400 rims and tubeless
    2008/2009 Burton T6 156cm with Burton Triad Bindings & DC Judge boots

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by tednugent View Post
    you can say that about any other entry level bike when you're starting at 2200/2300/Claris level components, compared to higher end bikes with higher end (and lighter) compoinents.
    I agree, but the main problem with the 3.0 (as I mentioned earlier) is that the shifters aren't even fully integrated and you're stuck with thumb shifters.

    It'd be a waste to upgrade to Claris/Sora and then upgrade again when you decide that you want even more savings.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aravilar View Post
    I'm sure you're a material sciences expert. Or just another idiot troll.
    PlatyPius may be stubborn in his ways, but he's far from being an idiot troll.
    2010 Specialized Secteur Elite upgraded with 32T cassette and does not have Stan's (yet)
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp 29er upgraded with 36T cassette and Stan's Arch EX rims and tubeless. Considering a 1x10 upgrade
    2013 Cannondale CAADX-6 Tiagra upgraded to 32T cassette and Stan's Alpha 400 rims and tubeless
    2008/2009 Burton T6 156cm with Burton Triad Bindings & DC Judge boots

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