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  1. #1
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    Actual weight of Ridley Boreas frame, 2009

    Looking at the massive aluminum tubing on this frame, and I have heard Ridley frames are pigs, can anybody confirm the weight of this frame? Excel Sports says it is 3.5 lbs, but another website (Sierra Trading) says it's a whopping 1490 gms or 4.5 lbs! I don't think Sierra Trading has any reason to lie. Anybody know for sure? Actual weight on any size would be helpful, but I'm looking at a small.

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    I built one up for a friend of mine its 1380 and definitely not a pig - very fast and ride is very similar to my Damocles which is not surprising as it has same geometry and same shaped tubes. Forks are 460g uncut.

    Weight of frame and fork is standard for aluminium frames, I am sure there are lighter alu frames out there but for sure you will loose some of the power transfer and acceleration.
    A writer cannot serve today those who make history, he must serve those who are subject to it - history's victims ..... Albert Camus

  3. #3
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    my scandium is 1380g, so I would think that 1490g is not out of line.

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    Actually I checked the Sierra ad again and they say the total weight is 4.5 lbs so I think that is frame and fork.

    BTW, don't Ridleys have long top tubes for the size??? I normally ride MED sloping frames but I had to order a SMALL as it is listed as having a 54.5 effective TT. That is pretty long. I normally ride around a 53.5 TT on 53 cm conventional frames (where I use a 130 mm stem) so here I'd use a 120 mm stem. But Ridley also lists even smaller sizes such as an XS and XXS size so this TT sounds reasonable for a small.

    I really like the red color scheme on the 2009 frames so this influenced my decision. Actually I'm searching for an economical frame for my Fortius Multiplayer trainer and the Ridley looks a lot better than a silver Motobecane . So weight isn't that important but I would use the bike as a backup on the road.

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    mtbbmet - what size is your bike - A friend of mine had a size 50 scandium and it felt around 1200g but didn't actually weigh it. It is supposed to be an amazing frame what do you think of it?
    A writer cannot serve today those who make history, he must serve those who are subject to it - history's victims ..... Albert Camus

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by toonraid
    mtbbmet - what size is your bike - A friend of mine had a size 50scandium and it felt around 1200g but didn't actually weigh it. It is supposed to be an amazing frame what do you think of it?
    Mine is also a 50 (53cmTT). I really like the frame, full on race bike geometry. Fast, and stiffer than most carbon frames I have ever ridden. Handles really well. Built it with DA7900, EA70 wheels, and WCS bits. Just under 16lbs with pedals and cages. It's for sale if you know anyone who is interested. I have a CX-1 on the way for next year, need to get rid of this.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clevor
    Looking at the massive aluminum tubing on this frame, and I have heard Ridley frames are pigs, can anybody confirm the weight of this frame? Excel Sports says it is 3.5 lbs, but another website (Sierra Trading) says it's a whopping 1490 gms or 4.5 lbs! I don't think Sierra Trading has any reason to lie. Anybody know for sure? Actual weight on any size would be helpful, but I'm looking at a small.
    1490 grams is 3.28 lbs. 454 g = 1 pound.

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    Received the frame yesterday. Frame weight of SMALL 2009 Boreas frame without seatpost collar = 1360 gms, or 2.9995 lbs. This includes water bottle bolts, front derailleur adjust knobs, and cable guide under BB. Really not bad, considering the weight on something like a Colnago C50 or Paris Carbon is around 2.5 lbs, and those are full carbon frames.

    The fork however, is a pig = 510 grams! It's carbon steerer and legs but aluminum crown. No doubt heavier than the forks that come on higher end, full carbon frames. However weight of both frame and fork is around 4.1 lbs, not bad considering the aluminum components. I think the fork is well balanced with the frame; those beefy, triangulized alu tubes on the frame will overpower a flexy fork. The stock fork has thick legs and a heavy alu crown to establish center of gravity so I think it was well engineered for such a stiff frame. I like how the 2009 Fenix fork has s-shaped legs to match the chainstay. A 3k weave crank will provide perfect balance of carbon components on the frame.

    Really like the box Ridley ships the frame in: super beefy and I can use it to store and transport my higher end frames. Sierra Trading post only charged me $17 for Priority Mail freight to my FPO AP address and I got it in a week during the Christmas rush! Other vendors were quoting me $50 freight.

    My impression of an albeit low-end Ridley: very nice layout of 3k weave on fork and chainstay; overall very good build quality and welds on this Taiwan frame; decal layout on paint job for frame and fork without flaw. Although the clearcoat on the fork is gorgeous, a bit of orange peel on clearcoat of frame, but hey, you will see this on $5,000 Pinarellos.

    I'm glad I decided to opt for a name brand manufacturer rather than go with a Motobecane or one of those carbon monocoques from China on Ebay. Ridleys used to be made in Belgium and it's pro tour quality so I know the BB or chainstays will be aligned correctly - no surprises on the buildup.

    Really like the candy red paint job on the 2009 frames. Because of the triangulated tubing, the color changes depending on how the frame is viewed, so it looks like the frame is paint three different colors of red.

    I have to think those higher end Ridleys must be pretty sweet!
    Last edited by Clevor; 12-17-2009 at 03:09 PM.

  9. #9
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    Boreas has been discountinued and therefore does not feature in the 2010 line up so your frame must be 2009 or earlier, if you post a pic can give you the year - I weighed the fenix fork on my old Gladius and it was 460g - but they are tough a friend of mine went into back of a stationary car at 20mph and while his frame broke due to secondary impact as it swivelled round and hit the bumper the fork was fine - not even a crack or anything so very tough forks but i guess they must be to survive belgian cobbles.
    A writer cannot serve today those who make history, he must serve those who are subject to it - history's victims ..... Albert Camus

  10. #10
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    For the record, Ridley's have never been made in Belgium. They started as frame painters, not frame builders. All their bikes have always been built in Asia.
    Enjoy it. I love my Ridleys, I'll be sad to see them go.

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    Sorry but that is not the case.

    Jochim Aerts (founder of Ridley) started out painting bikes - then went on to making them. When carbon became the buzz they had their carbon frames made in Italy (2005 & earlier) and back in those days the Excalibur and Damocles had a habit of cracking in chainstay or nr BB which prompted them to switch production to new factory who is now also making cervelo and Scott - post 2006 frames are top quality and I have not had any problems with my excalibur, damocles or gladius frames and have just pulled trigger on a Noah. Some frames (eg Oval = track) are still made in Italy.

    Interestingly enough their neighbours - Merckx were also making their carbon frames in Italy but switched to Taiwan a couple of years ago too - not sure if they are still making their alu frames in Belgium tho.

    Love my Ridley's too
    A writer cannot serve today those who make history, he must serve those who are subject to it - history's victims ..... Albert Camus

  12. #12
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    Yes, what I've heard is similar to Toonraid. I've held only passing interest in Ridley frames the last couple of years. But I knew that Cadel Evans and Robby McEwen rode their frames as part of Silence-Lotto. What I gathered (also based on a magazine review) was that their frames were heavy because they were built stiff for McEwen, with massive tubes.

    One of the posts in those long, 'High-end bikes made in the Far East' threads was about how Ridley frames were advertised as made in Belgium when they were in fact made in Taiwan. Around 2 years ago, Ridley fessed up and now stopped doing this. So originally their frames were made in Belgium, then they switched to Taiwan but didn't indicate it, and now they have 'come clean' so to speak, heh heh . Pinarello was doing this for several years and never admitted it until several reviews brought this to light, combined with threads over at the Pinarello forum. At least Colnago admits which frames are made in Taiwan (and indicate so with a sticker on the frames); they have done this from the gitgo. I am not surprised that Merck has thrown in the towel also. The problem is, prices on high-end frames have gone up, not gone down. The ceiling was $4,000 2-3 years ago, now it's $5,500 for a Colnago EPS and Pinarello Dogma. So the profit margin must be enormous for the manufacturers.

    My Boreas does not state anywhere on the frame the source, there is just a sticker that says 'Tested on Pave'.

    For what it's worth, everybody who owns a Colnago C50 (which is still made in Italy) knows about how the walls on the steerer tubes of those $800 Star forks aren't even the same thickness! It looks oblong!

    I've scrutinized the 4ZA Fenix fork that came with my Boreas and the fit and finish is beyond reproach. The 3k weave is laid out flawlessly; the clearcoat has a perfect gloss with no hint of orange peel; the steerer tube where it is glued to the crown has a uniform bead of glue and the alu portion is Scotchbrited to remove burrs (I've seen pits in the carbon steerer on Colnago Star forks); and the steerer tube thickness is perfectly uniform and even deburred at the top to remove stress risers. 4ZA is a Belgium company that specs the components for Ridley frames such as fork, chainstay, and headset, and all their products are made in Taiwan. Really nothing wrong with stuff, especially carbon components, made in the Far East nowadays.

    Look at those $5,500 Pinarello Dogma and Prince frames, all made in the Far East. The MOst handlebars and stems are all made in China also, which is why you see so many of them on Ebay since owners ditch the items first thing. That is why me personally, I would never buy the latest offerings from Pinarello. For what they want for their frames, it's just not worth it. If you look on Ebay, Onda forks are selling for $60 from vendors in Taiwan, which seem to be the same forks that used to come on a $4,000 Paris Carbon.

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    Anybody know where I can get a spare headset for the Boreas? I presume it's the same as the Damocles and Noah except the bearings are 1-1/8" top and bottom. I think FSA makes an Orbit headset?

    I sent an e-mail to Ridley on how to get the 4ZA headset but no reply. FSA needs to know the angles of the bearing cups at the top and bottom. Is the Boreas headset the same as one that is 'Campy compatible'?

  14. #14
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    Any shop that stocks Ridley should be able to get it in for you - it is indead an FSA and same as the other's in their range that don't have oversized HT might be a good idea to get a RD hanger while you are at it too.

    I cam across Ridley in 2007 and even back then they were not saying its made in Belgium but in general manufactuers have been a bit vague in where their frames are made which i suppose is understandable to some extent - these days customers seem more understanding towards global sourcing.

    Actually the Helium was made for Cadel and at 900g is great for climbers who don't put out so many watts on the frame but reply on pushing 450 W over a long distance climb - Noah was made for Robbie and co who can put out upwards of 1500W in a sprint where weight is not the key factor - when he moved to Katusha he loved his Noah so much so that he convinced Katusha to switch from Ridley as frame sponsor (Katusha was built on the framework of Tinkoff Credit Systems who used Colnago). I have just ordered a Noah - I like it when someone innovates and the Noah is very different to anything else out there - Robbie said on his site that he gained 2km/hr when he switched from the old Noah to the new Noah - at my age even 1 km/hr would be welcomed.

    Rumour has it that Lotto riders hated their new frames in 2009 (Canyon) and were so unhappy with the frames that they were returned them a couple of times and were even thinking of switching to Aluminium - seeing how bad Lotto did in 2009 adds more weight to that rumour - I guess Canyon must have come up with something accptable by the time Cadel hit the worlds or just used another frame and badged it as a Canyon - it won't be the first time as in 2007 Tdf Cadel wasn't actually using Ridley's top of the range TT frame (Cronus) but something that looked a lot like a Planet X frame badged as Ridley - In 2008 tho it was the unmistakeable Dean.

    Apparently what elite cyclists like and what your typical middle aged cyclist (like me) like are very different - for them performance (stiffness & handling) is key but for most of us its the comfort and we don't put out anywhere near their power output. I have a couple of friends in the continental circuit and when i hear their opinion about a frame they have ridden and compare it to some of the reviews by users on here it makes me laugh - during a climb we max out at 175 HR while they'd be doing something like 85 HR next to us (happened to a guy I know who is a coach at a gran fondo) next to simeoni.
    A writer cannot serve today those who make history, he must serve those who are subject to it - history's victims ..... Albert Camus

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    We have been a Ridely dealer for about 8 or 9 years. In that time I can't ever recall them claiming to make the bikes themselves. Some bikes ARE made in Belgium, but not by Ridley. Some are made in other parts of the EU, but most are Asian made. IIRC, Ridley has never hidden the fact that they don't make anything themselves. They do design, and painting. And not even all the painting. The Crossbows are now painted in Asia. I think their website may be a bit misleading stating that Aerts has been making bikes since the 90's. That may be true, but it also stopped in the 90's. They started out as a painter for many Euro brands, then started to source frames and badged them as Ridley. Most Ridley's do have the made in Taiwan sticker on them.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbbmet
    1st posting .....For the record, Ridley's have never been made in Belgium. They started as frame painters, not frame builders. All their bikes have always been built in Asia.


    2nd posting ....... Some bikes ARE made in Belgium, but not by Ridley. Some are made in other parts of the EU
    Slip of the tongue I assume (or fingers)!

    For the record I have never seen "made in Taiwan" sticker on a Ridley - technically if they add value to a product by a certain margin (think its 40 or 60%) made originally outside the EU it could be classified as made in EU - so as long as they paint them and assemble them it could be said "Made in Belgium" according to EU rules but they don't say that ... hows that for honesty.
    A writer cannot serve today those who make history, he must serve those who are subject to it - history's victims ..... Albert Camus

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by toonraid
    Slip of the tongue I assume (or fingers)!

    For the record I have never seen "made in Taiwan" sticker on a Ridley - technically if they add value to a product by a certain margin (think its 40 or 60%) made originally outside the EU it could be classified as made in EU - so as long as they paint them and assemble them it could be said "Made in Belgium" according to EU rules but they don't say that ... hows that for honesty.
    A bit of both actually. I totally forgot that they source from Euro builders until someone here, I think you, pointed it out about the Oval. My original post was a slip of the fingers. I meant that they don't build anything themselves. I worded it wrong. It was a bad post all the way around I guess. And by the asia thing, I meant they have always made bikes in Asia (or had bikes made I guess is a better way to put it). I guess I should slow down and think a bit more.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbbmet
    We have been a Ridely dealer for about 8 or 9 years. In that time I can't ever recall them claiming to make the bikes themselves. Some bikes ARE made in Belgium, but not by Ridley. Some are made in other parts of the EU, but most are Asian made. IIRC, Ridley has never hidden the fact that they don't make anything themselves. They do design, and painting. And not even all the painting. The Crossbows are now painted in Asia. I think their website may be a bit misleading stating that Aerts has been making bikes since the 90's. That may be true, but it also stopped in the 90's. They started out as a painter for many Euro brands, then started to source frames and badged them as Ridley. Most Ridley's do have the made in Taiwan sticker on them.
    Take a look at this link:

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Ridley-Boreas-...item4a9cbecdb1

    The label on the BB clearly says 'Made in Belgium". I also definitely recall seeing some Ridley frames around 2 years ago in a bike shop in Japan, with labels stating "Designed in Belgium". I know, because I was the one who posted a comment on that thread about high-end stuff actually made in the Far East, that at least Ridley is finally fess'in up .

    Can't say I've seen a 'Made in Taiwan' sticker on any of their frames, though. I expected to see one on the 2009 Boreas I got. I'll check the box when I get home.

    Colnago will have a sticker on the frame stating "Designed in Italy, Made in Taiwan". Back in 2005 or so, Pinarello replaced the sticker on Paris Carbons stating 'Made in Italy" with "Italiano Adrenalina" or something like that (wink). I think the first year the Paris came out it was made in Italy. I would say all the Operas were still made in Italy before they were discontinued.
    Last edited by Clevor; 12-22-2009 at 01:42 PM.

  19. #19
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    Like I said earlier due to the added value they can technically (and legally) state that its made in Belgium - also same as if a company buy plain T shirts from Vietnam for 1$ and then make a print on it here in Europe at a cost of 0.60$ they could say made in EU. But the cycling inustry is like an open book so everyone kind of knows where everything is made so perhaps they thought its mis-leading the consumer and better to say "Designed in Belgium".

    For the record if its a monocoque construction then you can be 99% certain that its made in asia - if its lug & tube then its more that likely made in Europe (or US). Only Colnago EPS & C50 are lug & tube and made in Italy - Look 585,595. All pina's & Merckx are made in Asia (I think actually same factory). Also top of the range Fondriest is made in Italy as is the entire Museeuw range (by billato). Treks, specs are all coming out of china as are most cannondales (used to be states but have been switching production for some years now).
    A writer cannot serve today those who make history, he must serve those who are subject to it - history's victims ..... Albert Camus

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clevor
    Take a look at this link:

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Ridley-Boreas-...item4a9cbecdb1

    The label on the BB clearly says 'Made in Belgium". I also definitely recall seeing some Ridley frames around 2 years ago in a bike shop in Japan, with labels stating "Designed in Belgium". I know, because I was the one who posted a comment on that thread about high-end stuff actually made in the Far East, that at least Ridley is finally fess'in up .

    Can't say I've seen a 'Made in Taiwan' sticker on any of their frames, though. I expected to see one on the 2009 Boreas I got. I'll check the box when I get home.

    Colnago will have a sticker on the frame stating "Designed in Italy, Made in Taiwan". Back in 2005 or so, Pinarello replaced the sticker on Paris Carbons stating 'Made in Italy" with "Italiano Adrenalina" or something like that (wink). I think the first year the Paris came out it was made in Italy. I would say all the Operas were still made in Italy before they were discontinued.
    I wonder if this is a Canadian thing. Both of my bikes have the "Designed in Belgium" sticker on them, and I remember peeling the "made in Taiwan" sticker off of at least one of my bikes. I wonder if they have to put that on for the Candaian market, but not the US market.
    We have about 30 frames at the shop right now, I haven't been in for a bit but I'm working today. I'll have a look and report back.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbbmet
    I wonder if this is a Canadian thing. Both of my bikes have the "Designed in Belgium" sticker on them, and I remember peeling the "made in Taiwan" sticker off of at least one of my bikes. I wonder if they have to put that on for the Candaian market, but not the US market.
    We have about 30 frames at the shop right now, I haven't been in for a bit but I'm working today. I'll have a look and report back.
    I would think it's the other way around. The U.S. has a regulation that all products must state the source of it's components (to prevent what Pinarello has been doing). Park Tools is really good about this; I bought a wrench kit where on the box it stated parts were obtained from China, Malaysia, or Korea, and assembled in the U.S. Unless a Ridley frame selling in the U.S. with no indication of source is gray market. But I doubt Sierra Trading Post, where I bought my Boreas, would do something like this. I checked the Ridley box my frame came in, no 'Made in Taiwan' on it.

    I have a C50 which is circa 2005 and I am not happy with the construction. Besides the steerer tube on the fork having thicker walls in certain areas, if I examine the chainstay area carefully, I see pits or depressions which have been filled in with resin. If only the Italians made bike frames as immaculate as they do shoes . . . Paint job and clearcoat is terrific, though. The clearcoat has absolutely no hint of orange peel. Very difficult to spray on such coverage without sanding or buffing out the finish to achieve the same effect. But I have seen Colnago frames with some orange peel.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by toonraid
    Treks, specs are all coming out of china as are most cannondales (used to be states but have been switching production for some years now).
    I still see Cannondales in bike shops in Japan which state they are made in the U.S.A. And Trek still insists their frames are made there. Gee, can anybody show me pics of a monocoque manufacturing facility in the U.S.?

    The early HED Stinger wheels were actually made in Wisconsin. One reason I bought a set, a good deal for around $1100. I even saw a set in a bike shop in Japan which said it was made in the U.S.A.. Unfortunately, the bladder process was such a pain-in-the-butt, HED switched to using Gigantex rims which are made in the Far East, which is what I got on mine. But hey, maybe it holds up better.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by toonraid
    Any shop that stocks Ridley should be able to get it in for you - it is indead an FSA and same as the other's in their range that don't have oversized HT might be a good idea to get a RD hanger while you are at it too.
    Do Ridleys have problems with the derailleur hanger? Because I've seen threads on Google for people looking for one. The design does look a bit fragile. At least it should not pose much of a problem on a trainer bike.

    Another nice touch on Ridley frames: they come with a chainstay protector. Pinarello does include one, but not Colnago. They really should supply one, as it's a ***** to find anything that will fit the diamond chainstays.

  24. #24
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    No problem with RD hangers but frame RD hangers are designed to be more fragile than the frame itself therefore protecting the frame by sacrificing themselves in a crash and are therefore the weakest link in a frame (by design). Given that they are so cheap its better to have one in case you have a crash and damage your RD right in the middle of the season when it might take you a week or two to find one.

    BTW have you seen the RD hanger on Noah - its monstrous - no wonder its such a hit with strong sprinters.
    A writer cannot serve today those who make history, he must serve those who are subject to it - history's victims ..... Albert Camus

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