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  1. #1
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    Smoke 'em if you got 'em.

    I admit that the poll results surprise me. I didn't think that there was that much support for legalization in this conservative state.

    A majority of Colorado voters support a ballot measure to legalize limited possession of marijuana, according to a new Denver Post poll.
    The poll found that the measure, Amendment 64, has the support of 51 percent of likely voters surveyed, compared with 40 percent opposed. Men favor the measure more than women, a common gender split on the issue. But 49 percent of women polled said they support the measure, compared with 39 percent who said they are opposed.
    Across every income bracket and in every age group except those 65 and older, more voters told pollsters they support the measure than oppose it, though some of the leads fall within the 4-percentage-point margin of error. Voters younger than 35 support the measure by a margin of 30 percentage points, 61 percent to 31 percent, according to the poll.
    Mike

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  2. #2
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    I don't smoke and I have no interest in it. But I support peoples right to if they want. I don't have any problems with pot. I think we waste way too much money fighting a war we are never going to win. Just legalize the softer drugs tax it and call it a day.

  3. #3
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    I think it should be legalized. I do not use anymore. Not since college really but I find it no worse than drinking. Probably better. We spend tons on fighting it and pushing it to the black market opens up contacts for people with real dangerous drugs.

    As for the surprise in Colorado? I think there are a lot of mountain bikers out there aren't there?

    ;)

  4. #4
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    Like gay marriage, the demographics say in a decade or two it should be legal.

    It's interesting that the strongest opposition is from generation that grew up before the 60's and therefore probably has the least experience with it.

    It would be interesting to see the breakdown of those for it/against it and if they have any experience with it or being around people using it.

  5. #5
    Wave, dammit!
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    Quote Originally Posted by pulser955 View Post
    I don't smoke and I have no interest in it. But I support peoples right to if they want. I don't have any problems with pot. I think we waste way too much money fighting a war we are never going to win. Just legalize the softer drugs tax it and call it a day.
    ^^^this^^^
    When a cyclist in your area is injured or killed by a motorist, make an extra effort the next day to go for a ride. It doesn't have to be an organized ride, or even a long ride. Hell, ride a 15 minute loop around your neighborhood if you want.

    Just be seen riding your bike.

    Do it to make people aware we're out there. Do it to honor a fellow traveler. Do it because you're lucky enough to still be able to.

  6. #6
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    A few differences

    Quote Originally Posted by Dwayne Barry View Post
    Like gay marriage, the demographics say in a decade or two it should be legal.

    It's interesting that the strongest opposition is from generation that grew up before the 60's and therefore probably has the least experience with it.

    It would be interesting to see the breakdown of those for it/against it and if they have any experience with it or being around people using it.
    With pot and soft drugs, there's two opposing industries profiting from the criminality. Dealers both high and low level, along with the DEA and associated organizations have a monitary motivation for the status quo.
    Unlike drug dealers, the illicit gay marriage industry failed to cash on while they had the chance. Unlike the DEA, there's no enforcement arm of our government relying on busting Adam and Steve's wedding to justify their annual budgetary allotment.
    And on the very day same sex marriages were made legal, you weren't facing a resulting mass exodus from the front gates of every prison in the country.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jesse D Smith View Post
    And on the very day same sex marriages were made legal, you weren't facing a resulting mass exodus from the front gates of every prison in the country.
    Valid points, but I'm pretty sure when laws are changed they're not retroactive. I would also guess the vast majority of people in jail related to pot aren't there for using but for dealing and legalizing it wouldn't make dealing it legal, anymore than I can home brew or distill alcohol and start selling it to people.

  8. #8
    gazing from the shadows
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwayne Barry View Post
    Valid points, but I'm pretty sure when laws are changed they're not retroactive. I would also guess the vast majority of people in jail related to pot aren't there for using but for dealing and legalizing it wouldn't make dealing it legal, anymore than I can home brew or distill alcohol and start selling it to people.
    People are "dealing" it in CO right now. So long as you have documentation, which it seems many in CO have.

    I do know many women are in prison for "dealing", because their husband or boyfriend was selling out of their house. People get charged for dealing because they have pot in more than one container. People get charged for dealing because of the amount they have (> 1 oz will bring "intent to deliver"). So while most people on pot charges are in prison for dealing, not all of them are really dealers in the sense of "selling to make money".

    As for the poll numbers, I think legalization/decriminalization poll numbers need to be discounted. By how much I don't know, but if it polls 50%, I would be shocked if it ended up 50% in the vote.
    .
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  9. #9
    Flash! ah–ahhh!
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeBiker View Post
    I admit that the poll results surprise me. I didn't think that there was that much support for legalization in this conservative state.
    We'll see. California had a legalization initiative on the ballot here a couple of years ago, and it was ahead in many polls up until a few weeks before the election. It ended up losing, though not by too much (53% voting 'no').

    On something like pot legalization, I think a majority or plurality in many states are in favor of it in the abstract, but when it comes time to actually pull the lever for it, some get cold feet... it's like their grandma's voice is yelling in their head that "this will cause the end of civilization as we know it!!!"

    Still, Colorado might well be the first. Which is a bit of a bummer, I wanted Cali to be it.
    .
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiQuaeQuod View Post
    People are "dealing" it in CO right now. So long as you have documentation, which it seems many in CO have.

    I do know many women are in prison for "dealing", because their husband or boyfriend was selling out of their house. People get charged for dealing because they have pot in more than one container. People get charged for dealing because of the amount they have (> 1 oz will bring "intent to deliver"). So while most people on pot charges are in prison for dealing, not all of them are really dealers in the sense of "selling to make money".

    As for the poll numbers, I think legalization/decriminalization poll numbers need to be discounted. By how much I don't know, but if it polls 50%, I would be shocked if it ended up 50% in the vote.
    Sure, my point is the folks in prison aren't going to be let out if pot is legalized because they weren't licensed dealers regardless of if the law is even made retroactive. Making pot legal almost certainly won't be a free for all, it will be regulated just like alcohol is.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by SystemShock View Post
    We'll see. California had a legalization initiative on the ballot here a couple of years ago, and it was ahead in many polls up until a few weeks before the election. It ended up losing, though not by too much (53% voting 'no').

    On something like pot legalization, I think a majority or plurality in many states are in favor of it in the abstract, but when it comes time to actually pull the lever for it, some get cold feet... it's like their grandma's voice is yelling in their head that "this will cause the end of civilization as we know it!!!"

    Still, Colorado might well be the first. Which is a bit of a bummer, I wanted Cali to be it.
    .
    It's also because the groups opposed to issues like this pour in the money and advertisements in the weeks leading up to the election and change the minds of those undecided and "swing" voters. It happened here in Maine with gay marriage although on the same ballot medical marijuana passed by pretty large majority.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwayne Barry View Post
    It's also because the groups opposed to issues like this pour in the money and advertisements in the weeks leading up to the election and change the minds of those undecided and "swing" voters.

    It happened here in Maine with gay marriage although on the same ballot medical marijuana passed by pretty large majority.
    Yeah, I am happy that medical marijuana did pass here in Cali, at least. Many of those same groups that opposed complete legalization here screamed and hand-waved that it'd be 'teh end of the world!!!" if medical MJ passed, but it passed and the Apocalypse sure hasn't happened.

    And that fact is probably a stepping stone toward full legalization (which is what they were really afraid of all along).

    It really should be just flat-out legal by now. Alcohol is legal, and is worse, IMO.

    Have seen and heard tell of plenty of drunks starting nasty fights or driving crazy.
    Stoned ppl never start fights and seldom drive anywhere, they just want to stay in and eat.
    .
    Monkhouse: I want to die like my Dad did, peacefully, in his sleep... not screaming in terror like his passengers.

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  13. #13
    gazing from the shadows
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwayne Barry View Post
    Sure, my point is the folks in prison aren't going to be let out if pot is legalized because they weren't licensed dealers regardless of if the law is even made retroactive. Making pot legal almost certainly won't be a free for all, it will be regulated just like alcohol is.
    Once possession is legal, the police won't be making pot related offenses a priority. For various reasons, but mostly because if they can't threaten smokers with a crime, they can't get them to roll on their dealers. Which is how most dealers are caught, from a customer who wants to avoid jail time.
    .
    Stout beers under trees, please.

  14. #14
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    some "recreational drugs" will likely be decriminalized in the near future (5-15 years), as they have been in other countries, but they won't be legalized.


    Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs - Wikipedia

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