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  1. #1
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    Any Ti in the Peloton?

    Just wondering why I have never noticed any Titanium frames being ridden professionally?

    Is CF that much lighter/stronger? Do the teams not really care about long-lasting frames? Is Ti not all it's cracked up to be?

    It seems like most of the club riders I have known eventually upgrade to a Ti bike for touring and club rides, and the occasional race. Watup?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by TyboTy
    Just wondering why I have never noticed any Titanium frames being ridden professionally?

    Is CF that much lighter/stronger? Do the teams not really care about long-lasting frames? Is Ti not all it's cracked up to be?

    It seems like most of the club riders I have known eventually upgrade to a Ti bike for touring and club rides, and the occasional race. Watup?
    Isn't Magnus Backstedt's ride Ti?

    I think that's it... ti for touring and clubs and occasional race. Not... the highest level of racing.

    And long lasting frames? Are you joking me? Many of those guys can't even ride the same bike all season (tt bikes aside). Why worry about longevity if your sponsors are giving you new bikes just becuase they're not sure about the color?

  3. #3
    your text here
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    no that i really know, but i think ti is much more expensive than cf. and when you get new, advanced designed frames all the time, why waste money on a longer lasting frame when you wont be using it for it's full life?

  4. #4
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    Ti is more flexy than cf, which means some power transfer is lost between the rider and road through bike flex. Some bike mag did a comparison of ti, steel, cf and aluminum, measuring stiffness and lightness in the past six months. CF won. But ti is considered a lot more comfortable because that flex eats up road vibration better than CF. At least that is my understanding. I ride steel with a carbon fork on the road.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by triscuit
    Ti is more flexy than cf, which means some power transfer is lost between the rider and road through bike flex. Some bike mag did a comparison of ti, steel, cf and aluminum, measuring stiffness and lightness in the past six months. CF won. But ti is considered a lot more comfortable because that flex eats up road vibration better than CF. At least that is my understanding. I ride steel with a carbon fork on the road.
    Where does this stuff come from????? And stated like they are facts. - TF
    "Don't those guys know they're old?!!"
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  6. #6
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    I think

    the entire TdF Peloton is on CF except for Liquigas / Bianchi who are riding Al and Al/CF bikes. Magnus has custom Ti rides built for the classics,he may have the same for the tour. He said they build out of straight Ti tubes so that the material provides the comfort. Other materials can be made comfortable by design (bends and curves) but Maggie breaks them at these points.
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  7. #7
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    ???

    Quote Originally Posted by triscuit
    Ti is more flexy than cf, which means some power transfer is lost between the rider and road through bike flex. Some bike mag did a comparison of ti, steel, cf and aluminum, measuring stiffness and lightness in the past six months. CF won. But ti is considered a lot more comfortable because that flex eats up road vibration better than CF. At least that is my understanding. I ride steel with a carbon fork on the road.
    It's not the material but the design and construction. There are some Ti frames(some Litespeed models by my own experience) that I can't flex but there are a hell of alot CF that I can almost snap. My test is to put a bike on a trainer and standing up and peddling and watching how much they flex. Your proposition is incorrect.

  8. #8
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    wtf

    Quote Originally Posted by triscuit
    Ti is more flexy than cf, which means some power transfer is lost between the rider and road through bike flex. Some bike mag did a comparison of ti, steel, cf and aluminum, measuring stiffness and lightness in the past six months. CF won. But ti is considered a lot more comfortable because that flex eats up road vibration better than CF. At least that is my understanding. I ride steel with a carbon fork on the road.
    There are over 16 grades of commercial Ti out there. Last I checked, more than 5 have been used in bikes.

    As to vib absorption, have you ebver heard of wheels? As they are in constant contact with the roads surface, its a safe bet to give them a gander as well.
    This old anvil has cracked alot of hammers

  9. #9
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    Can't find anything more recent...

    Quote Originally Posted by http://bicirace.com/product/2006/BianchiVisit.html
    Or imagine the stress that the big titanium frame of Backstedt went through in the 2004 Paris-Roubaix before he crossed the line in victory.
    http://bicirace.com/product/2006/BianchiVisit.html

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by TyboTy
    Just wondering why I have never noticed any Titanium frames being ridden professionally?

    Is CF that much lighter/stronger? Do the teams not really care about long-lasting frames? Is Ti not all it's cracked up to be?

    It seems like most of the club riders I have known eventually upgrade to a Ti bike for touring and club rides, and the occasional race. Watup?
    Everyone wants a light bike. To get a Ti frame into the realm of upper end carbon frames weight wise it ends up being extremely noodly. That plus race sponsorship is about selling product and Carbon is it right now for high end race bikes. Race on Sunday sell on Monday.

  11. #11
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    Bicycling Magazine

    Quote Originally Posted by TurboTurtle
    Where does this stuff come from????? And stated like they are facts. - TF
    Where else but Bicycling Magazine, the National Enquirer of two wheeled information. Didn't B.M. have a fashion article last spring on rock star cyling clothes? Can't wait for the issue with the pics of aliens riding a bike.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by dagger
    It's not the material but the design and construction. There are some Ti frames(some Litespeed models by my own experience) that I can't flex but there are a hell of alot CF that I can almost snap. My test is to put a bike on a trainer and standing up and peddling and watching how much they flex. Your proposition is incorrect.
    I don't have anything to compare them too, but I agree with your method of testing flex. I've had two CF frames, my current frame being an 06 Roubaix Pro, which is the latest carbon Specialized makes but obviously a step down from the S-Works, but when I plug into a trainer and stand up, I can flex that dude pretty good! So while in the trainer I make a conscious effort to stay as straight as possible.

  13. #13
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    Nice bike

    Quote Originally Posted by sirthx
    my current frame being an 06 Roubaix Pro, which is the latest carbon Specialized .
    Rides great...and I would like an S-works too.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cruzer2424
    I think that's it... ti for touring and clubs and occasional race. Not... the highest level of racing.
    IIRC, Lance Armstrong would disagree with you--he's got the rainbow stripes to prove it (Litespeed bike in Eddy M. colors). For that matter, Webcor was riding Ti/carbon Lemonds year before last.

    I suspect it is two factors: who is able to sponsor a pro team, and what is in vogue.

    Sponsoring a team is a major commitment in terms of equipment--each rider has three rigs (two regular, one TT) for the tour. Twenty seven bikes just for the tour crew. The only titanium builder I can think of that might be able to put up the bucks and the frames might be Litespeed. Most of the other Ti builders I can think of are relatively small shops--sponsoring teams might just be beyond them at the pro level.

    I think carbon happens to be the more in-vogue frame material. Companies who want to sell bikes put what might sell under their riders.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by chbarr
    IIRC, Lance Armstrong would disagree with you--he's got the rainbow stripes to prove it (Litespeed bike in Eddy M. colors). For that matter, Webcor was riding Ti/carbon Lemonds year before last.

    I suspect it is two factors: who is able to sponsor a pro team, and what is in vogue.

    Sponsoring a team is a major commitment in terms of equipment--each rider has three rigs (two regular, one TT) for the tour. Twenty seven bikes just for the tour crew. The only titanium builder I can think of that might be able to put up the bucks and the frames might be Litespeed. Most of the other Ti builders I can think of are relatively small shops--sponsoring teams might just be beyond them at the pro level.

    I think carbon happens to be the more in-vogue frame material. Companies who want to sell bikes put what might sell under their riders.
    Yeah, remember Lance rode a Litespeed for his 1st win in the 1999 Tour.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by chbarr
    IIRC, Lance Armstrong would disagree with you--he's got the rainbow stripes to prove it (Litespeed bike in Eddy M. colors). For that matter, Webcor was riding Ti/carbon Lemonds year before last.

    I suspect it is two factors: who is able to sponsor a pro team, and what is in vogue.

    Sponsoring a team is a major commitment in terms of equipment--each rider has three rigs (two regular, one TT) for the tour. Twenty seven bikes just for the tour crew. The only titanium builder I can think of that might be able to put up the bucks and the frames might be Litespeed. Most of the other Ti builders I can think of are relatively small shops--sponsoring teams might just be beyond them at the pro level.

    I think carbon happens to be the more in-vogue frame material. Companies who want to sell bikes put what might sell under their riders.

    Well. Saying lance rode Ti 7...9 years ago whatever is like saying that old tour riders rode steel 30 years ago.

    I saw a British team on Litespeeds last year. I can't remember what team it was...

    Also KGSN rode Ti Serottas last year before they switched to Merckx.


    My point: Who knows.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cruzer2424
    Well. Saying lance rode Ti 7...9 years ago whatever is like saying that old tour riders rode steel 30 years ago.

    I saw a British team on Litespeeds last year. I can't remember what team it was...

    Also KGSN rode Ti Serottas last year before they switched to Merckx.


    My point: Who knows.
    Recycling.co.uk team. Rob Hayles, Evan Oliphant, Chris newton, etc. They are on Pinarello this year.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sirthx
    Yeah, remember Lance rode a Litespeed for his 1st win in the 1999 Tour.
    A Litespeed Blade time trial bike. His regular road bike was a Trek.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by OnTheRivet
    Recycling.co.uk team. Rob Hayles, Evan Oliphant, Chris newton, etc. They are on Pinarello this year.

    wow. That's impressive.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cruzer2424
    wow. That's impressive.
    Thanks to Cycling.tv
    Actually the UK racing is very watchable, some really cool courses.

  21. #21
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    There were teams on Litespeed during the 2002 World Cup season that I know of. I recall seeing them in the TdF. I can't quite recall if they made an appearance beyond that date.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by The The
    There were teams on Litespeed during the 2002 World Cup season that I know of. I recall seeing them in the TdF. I can't quite recall if they made an appearance beyond that date.
    Lotto. The year before they rode GT's. The year after they merged with Domo and rode Merckx.

  23. #23
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    Lance rode Ti Caloi

    Pretty sure I've seen early pics of Lance racing on a ti caloi (built by litespeed), but that was probably around a decade ago.
    Who the hell are these children...and why are they calling me "Dad"?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaestroXC
    A Litespeed Blade time trial bike. His regular road bike was a Trek.
    You sure about that?? I understood he was very disappointed in the Trek road bike so they gave him a Litespeed and they covered it in Trek logos.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by atpjunkie
    the entire TdF Peloton is on CF except for Liquigas / Bianchi who are riding Al and Al/CF bikes. Magnus has custom Ti rides built for the classics,he may have the same for the tour. He said they build out of straight Ti tubes so that the material provides the comfort. Other materials can be made comfortable by design (bends and curves) but Maggie breaks them at these points.

    There was an article in Cyclesport a few months ago on Backstedt's Ti bike. Since he kept breaking the alu bianchis, they built him the straight tube Ti for the 2004 paris-roubaix, which he won. He said he used that frame for 04,05, and was still using the same one as they went to press for the article, I think feb 2006. Impressive durability for a frame under a 90kg rider.

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