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  1. #1
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    Physiology of the tour riders article

    An article I found interesting on the impact of the tour on racers' bodies I thought others might find interesting. Some of it was old news but some was new for me anyway.

    https://www.sbnation.com/cycling/201...pain-suffering
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  2. #2
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    Cool article and thanks for posting!
    So I tuned the Larrivee, drop D, then DADGAD.

  3. #3
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    Interesting. Thanks. I do think recovery is a bit individual as well as Movistar and Valverde himself have said a few times that one of his gifts if his ability to recover so easily after he races, and thus the reason he can race so many races throughout the season that very few other riders, esp top riders would even attempt.

  4. #4
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    All pro cyclists are genetic freaks on some level.

    I don't want to thread jack this, or really have any discussion further than this but you can see why doping happens. My belief is that anything they are doing is to try and recover so they can go do it again tomorrow.
    If your job, income and fame in some cases are all dependent on your physical performance, I think you would do whatever you could to be consistent.

    I ride 5-6 days a week with nothing on the line and I am still looking for an edge. I have not yet resorted to pharmaceuticals....but I do have an inhaler.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Scorcho View Post
    All pro cyclists are genetic freaks on some level.

    I don't want to thread jack this, or really have any discussion further than this but you can see why doping happens. My belief is that anything they are doing is to try and recover so they can go do it again tomorrow.
    If your job, income and fame in some cases are all dependent on your physical performance, I think you would do whatever you could to be consistent.

    I ride 5-6 days a week with nothing on the line and I am still looking for an edge. I have not yet resorted to pharmaceuticals....but I do have an inhaler.
    Even with all that no other rider has ever been able to find the consistency that Valverde has from the start to the end of the season. Sprinters are a bit of a different animal as they don't need to be there in the mountains, whereas Valverde can mix it up with the sprinters, then mix it up with the puncheurs (which is probably what he is) and then turn around and mix it up with the climbers.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Scorcho View Post
    All pro cyclists are genetic freaks on some level.

    I don't want to thread jack this, or really have any discussion further than this but you can see why doping happens. My belief is that anything they are doing is to try and recover so they can go do it again tomorrow.
    If your job, income and fame in some cases are all dependent on your physical performance, I think you would do whatever you could to be consistent.

    I ride 5-6 days a week with nothing on the line and I am still looking for an edge. I have not yet resorted to pharmaceuticals....but I do have an inhaler.
    Interestingly, in one part of the article where the question of cumulative was damaged was asked (question #10), the response from Sims was:

    Thatís a research question that has been around, and people are doing a little bit of longitudinal research, but the confounding factor there is the fact that the sport isnít clean. If the sport was clean, then weíd have some really good data to say yes or no. Like if you look at runners who have been racing competitively and donít have the same drug induced aspect that cycling does...
    it's just one more testimony that serves to reinforce the dirtiness of this sport compared to all other endurance sports.

    It's my opinion that if you need any sort of chemical (not counting food) to assist you, then it's not clean. And while I don't want to sound like I'm discriminating against asthma sufferer, but if a racer needs to take asthma drug stop him from dying on the Tour, maybe he shouldn't be considered fit to race. Exercise-induced asthma is, to me, is a limitation of the body.

  7. #7
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    Overall it was a nice reading article. But, IMO, Sims sounded like she's understating the challenge of running a competitive marathon a bit. As great as these doped up Tour cyclists are, none of them will ever be able to hang with the elite African runners (who are less like to dope according to Sims). To even ask to compare riding a Tour stage to running a marathon is also ridiculous. Guys can ride back to back mountain stages, but no marathoners will be able to run 2 marathons back to back. Marathoners do have a real risk of acute kidney damage after a race, acute muscle and tendon damage, these are some of the risks that a cyclist is less likely to face.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    Overall it was a nice reading article. But, IMO, Sims sounded like she's understating the challenge of running a competitive marathon a bit. As great as these doped up Tour cyclists are, none of them will ever be able to hang with the elite African runners (who are less like to dope according to Sims). To even ask to compare riding a Tour stage to running a marathon is also ridiculous. Guys can ride back to back mountain stages, but no marathoners will be able to run 2 marathons back to back. Marathoners do have a real risk of acute kidney damage after a race, acute muscle and tendon damage, these are some of the risks that a cyclist is less likely to face.
    Completely useless comparison. Winning in any way you define it, in Cycling, is about finding out and managing effort and recovery on the bike. There is no comparison to running. Unless, someone has found a way to coast while running... It is such a shallow understanding of the sport to compare it to other endurance sports. It is unique like all of them are. Kenyan runners could suck at cycling, even if you could make Cycling a single thing. As we know, it is not even close to a single thing. From trackies to sprinters to classics to climbers, it still comes down to managing effort and recovery on the bike. There is no other sport, maybe inline speed skating on the track, that is such a complex team endurance sport, again, all based on activity vs recovery on the bike.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

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    African distance runners not doping? It has been shown that the out of competition testing, and in competition testing, is a joke in almost every other sport than cycling. Are cyclist still cheating, yes I don't deny it. They are running genetic freaks, like all elites are, but track and field has as many issues as cycling. The comparison of one marathon to one tour stage depends on the stage, look at climbing the alps at altitude over 6 hours. What makes 3 week tours unique is that it is an every day endurance event inside of huge endurance event. What do ultra marathoners think of an elite marathoner who only races 26 miles every couple of months? I would not trust an African marathoner is not blood doping or microdoping CERA the same way I would not trust a bunch of the sprinters on the fast twitch side of it.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    It's my opinion that if you need any sort of chemical (not counting food) to assist you, then it's not clean. And while I don't want to sound like I'm discriminating against asthma sufferer, but if a racer needs to take asthma drug stop him from dying on the Tour, maybe he shouldn't be considered fit to race. Exercise-induced asthma is, to me, is a limitation of the body.
    So in your opinion, I am a doper? My EIA, which I developed after a dozen years as roadie, is never a problem while I am riding. But the couple of hours after a hard effort is misery without the inhaler. I cough so hard that I will throw up, and or nearly pass out.

    In my case the chemical I am ingesting does very little for my abilities during the ride, but without it I don't know if I would continue in the sport.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Scorcho View Post
    So in your opinion, I am a doper? My EIA, which I developed after a dozen years as roadie, is never a problem while I am riding. But the couple of hours after a hard effort is misery without the inhaler. I cough so hard that I will throw up, and or nearly pass out.

    In my case the chemical I am ingesting does very little for my abilities during the ride, but without it I don't know if I would continue in the sport.
    Our medical director explained that high volume training in cold or at altitude will cause EIA. And he explained what happens exactly as you do. And he added that when properly used it is NOT a PED. It IS A PED but only when used in doses higher than needed. This is a gross oversimplification. It does sound ridiculous, I get it, but a trained professional didnít see it that way at all, he saw it as asking for EIA by training at altitude, albeit he understood why you would want to do that.


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    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

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