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  1. #1
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    Anyone do Bike + Weight Training?

    I've been both lifting and biking haphazardly for a few years now and have gotten if not quite over-trained then definitely overreached/burnt out. I got a trial subscription to TrainerRoad just for giggles and have caught on to their amazing Ask a Cycling Coach podcast. I'm realizing that I've just burning myself out with no clear plan or training structure. I usually lift 3x week and bike 4x per week - around 80-100 mi.

    After listening to the podcast I'm ready to sort of start over. I meet with a phys therapist in a couple weeks and am going to get a good fit first off. Anyone else lift and bike alot with a good structured plan? Did you have to go to a coach or put it together yourself?

  2. #2
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    Yes. My lifting is really an adapted physical therapy routine that was developed to help me back from an injury. Basically, it's core centric with extra emphasis on glutes and legs. During my race season it's maintenance to make sure muscles stay engaged and balanced. During the off season and base I try to build...

  3. #3
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    Interesting. I'm wondering if I wait to put together a more thorough plan once summer is over - wish I would have thought to do this three or four months ago. Not sure how to do base training / establish base aerobic fitness - with summer rides fast approaching.

  4. #4
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    Mine is same as woodys.

    18 years been lifting regulary, 4 days a week, fairly intense 75-90 min sessions, every week of every year.

    If I don't, the pain from the accident I had back in 2000 becomes overwhelming and I am off the bike.

    Too much ligament and muscle damage, so other body parts have to step up their game, and cannot do so without intensive weight training.

  5. #5
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    I do light weights with reps of 15 to 20 till with enough weight to make that exhastion and other upper body work like bar dips and planks 2x / week with a recover spin from intervals the previous day on Wednesdays and Fridays, 2 sets each day - takes about 10 to 15 minutes.
    Moderation is boring - do epic s##t

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  6. #6
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    I'm on the bike typically six days a week and in the gym every other day. I use machines and do body weight exercises; no free weights.

    I'm there about an hour, or as time permits, and since I've usually just pedaled from work I'm tired and hungry. Would like to get a personal trainer one of these years.

  7. #7
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    I haven't been to the gym or lifted a weight in years. The only non bike exercises I do are running, xc skiing (from November to April) and stabilizing exercises with bands and stretches to prevent overuse injuries.

    I only have 8 hours/week to dedicate to cycling. If I had more time, or wasn't doing well in races, I'd consider other stuff but I honestly think lifting is a very, very small percentage of your fitness pie, unless you're a pure sprinter. Which I'm very much not.
    I like to ride fast.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmcg333 View Post
    I've been both lifting and biking haphazardly for a few years now and have gotten if not quite over-trained then definitely overreached/burnt out. I got a trial subscription to TrainerRoad just for giggles and have caught on to their amazing Ask a Cycling Coach podcast. I'm realizing that I've just burning myself out with no clear plan or training structure. I usually lift 3x week and bike 4x per week - around 80-100 mi.

    After listening to the podcast I'm ready to sort of start over. I meet with a phys therapist in a couple weeks and am going to get a good fit first off. Anyone else lift and bike alot with a good structured plan? Did you have to go to a coach or put it together yourself?
    Good call on TrainerRoad.

    I'm doing their low volume plans (3X week) + 1 day lifting with a personal trainer + 1 Saturday outdoor ride (3 hours). TrainerRoad syncs with Strava, so I can track total TSS as a sum of my indoor and outdoor rides.

    So I'm working out 5 days a week and that's enough for me. My two rest days are either sitting on the couch or active recovery by taking out the e-bike. The e-bike prevents me from turning a recovery ride into a hammerfest.

    The guys on the TrainerRoad podcast often warn riders new to structured training to go with the low volume plans before diving in head first. If your FTP is assessed correctly, even the Sweet Spot Base plan will hurt as early as week 2.

  9. #9
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    No. I want to ride as fast as possible on the bike, so I ride the bike.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmcg333 View Post
    I usually lift 3x week and bike 4x per week - around 80-100 mi.
    That's a sure way to burn out even if you are in your 20's.
    There are 2 ways to approach it, lift weights to enhance cycling or cycle to enhance cardio aspect for fat trimming (to get better definition of muscles). If former, you want to do light lifting just for core strength maintenance but not to build up, at lease not during the biking season.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by pedalbiker View Post
    No. I want to ride as fast as possible on the bike, so I ride the bike.
    Weight training is the fastest way to build strength/size. You can also ride bike to increase strength/size specifically for going fast but it will take longer than weight training.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    Weight training is the fastest way to build strength/size. You can also ride bike to increase strength/size specifically for going fast but it will take longer than weight training.
    Very true. Lifting builds strength, but due to the low numbers of repetition, increases the size of fast twitch muscles. These are the anaerobic fibers that won't do a damn thing for rider longer than about 15 seconds. Power requires aerobic endurance, slow twitch fibers, the cardio system. That takes longer than pumping up fast twitch muscles.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Very true. Lifting builds strength, but due to the low numbers of repetition, increases the size of fast twitch muscles. These are the anaerobic fibers that won't do a damn thing for rider longer than about 15 seconds. Power requires aerobic endurance, slow twitch fibers, the cardio system. That takes longer than pumping up fast twitch muscles.
    Also very true but there are various weight training methods for building fast or slow twitch muscles.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    Weight training is the fastest way to build strength/size. You can also ride bike to increase strength/size specifically for going fast but it will take longer than weight training.
    Since when does strength/size = faster riding?

    It's an aerobic sport. Size is about the last thing I want, and I have plenty of the strength needed to turn the pedals over. Generating high power for long durations, though, that's the issue. Gym doesn't help that in the least.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by pedalbiker View Post
    Since when does strength/size = faster riding?

    It's an aerobic sport. Size is about the last thing I want, and I have plenty of the strength needed to turn the pedals over. Generating high power for long durations, though, that's the issue. Gym doesn't help that in the least.
    Yep, high power riding is aerobic effort, slow twitch fibers, just below anaerobic threshold, which can be elevated through riding in a competitive group.

    Eddy recommended low weights and lots of repetitions, which bvber may be referring to. Eddy also characterized weight lifting as something riders could do over the winter to pull the body back together after wearing it down, particularly upper body, during the season.

    I tried his program one winter and came up the following Spring feeling 10 years younger. But still had to adjust to the more constant resistance of the bike, improve recovery times, and hydrate and digest carbs on the fly. By that time, the lifting sessions were over. My "form" pedaling fast and working the cardio system was also more precise and controlled, which would save energy or squeeze a little more power out of the effort.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by pedalbiker View Post
    Since when does strength/size = faster riding?
    Ever since the biophysics existed.

    It's an aerobic sport.
    Aerobics would be part of it.
    Size is about the last thing I want, and I have plenty of the strength needed to turn the pedals over.
    You've reached the optimum physique for road bike race? Congratulations.
    Generating high power for long durations, though, that's the issue. Gym doesn't help that in the least.
    Just wondering, you've tried weight training and found out that it didn't help at all?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Eddy recommended low weights and lots of repetitions, which bvber may be referring to. Eddy also characterized weight lifting as something riders could do over the winter to pull the body back together after wearing it down, particularly upper body, during the season.
    Yes, if OP is using weight training to enhance his cycling performance.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    Ever since the biophysics existed.


    Aerobics would be part of it.

    You've reached the optimum physique for road bike race? Congratulations.

    Just wondering, you've tried weight training and found out that it didn't help at all?
    I don't think you understand physics or physiology very well.

    No, it wouldn't.

    Yes, pretty much.

    Yes, over many years, from when I was a cat 4 all the way to a cat 1. I'm a much better cat 1 not doing it. Far more power across the board, from 1s to 3 hour. Shocker that it all came from focusing on that power on the bike!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post

    Eddy recommended low weights and lots of repetitions, which bvber may be referring to. Eddy also characterized weight lifting as something riders could do over the winter to pull the body back together after wearing it down, particularly upper body, during the season.
    Even if you wanted to do weights, doing that is essentially the opposite of modern physiology recommendations for endurance athletes.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by pedalbiker View Post
    Yes, pretty much.
    Pretty much but not completely? In that case, you have room for improvement.

    Yes, over many years, from when I was a cat 4 all the way to a cat 1. I'm a much better cat 1 not doing it. Far more power across the board, from 1s to 3 hour. Shocker that it all came from focusing on that power on the bike!
    Maybe you should send a message to these racers to let go of the gym idea.


  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by pedalbiker View Post
    Even if you wanted to do weights, doing that is essentially the opposite of modern physiology recommendations for endurance athletes.
    I don't think you understand physics or physiology very well. Perhaps some research on weight training and its benefit in endurance sports like cycling is in order.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    Pretty much but not completely? In that case, you have room for improvement.


    Maybe you should send a message to these racers to let go of the gym idea.

    So your extremely informed opinion is that I bulk up because that will help me ride faster? Really, what are you going on about?

    Ah, yes, "some" pros do a month or two of weight training during the offseason because it helps their riding so much.

    But the question has to be asked, why don't they do it year round?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    I don't think you understand physics or physiology very well. Perhaps some research on weight training and its benefit in endurance sports like cycling is in order.
    I've done plenty of research. You don't want to add mass, you want to add strength. You don't add strength with high rep, low weight training. You do it with low rep, high weight training.

    And that comes at a cost, which is why virtually no one does it year-round.

    There's also that little issue of specificity...

    But hey, you claim it makes you faster? And you claim you want to be bigger because that makes you faster? How does it make you faster?

    I've said how it didn't make me faster, and going fast is the only reason I ride a bike, and why I ride ten thousand miles a year and travel another few thousand miles each year to do pro crits, so it's obviously very important to me.

    So regal me with actual data, or at least a useful anecdote concerning your power increases. I mean, multiple winters in the weight room netted me a 1250 watt sprint, 700 watt one minute power and 320 watt threshold. Specific, dialed-in training on the bike netted me a 1500 watt sprint, 735 watts at 1 minute, and 350 watt threshold. And I lost weight, not put it on. Because that's sorta important, too.

    That's my actual data from my actual experience doing both, not just something I read on the internet and now feel compelled to argue about.

    And you?
    Last edited by pedalbiker; 5 Days Ago at 03:26 AM.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by pedalbiker View Post
    I've done plenty of research. You don't want to add mass, you want to add strength. You don't add strength with high rep, low weight training. You do it with low rep, high weight training.

    And that comes at a cost, which is why virtually no one does it year-round.

    There's also that little issue of specificity...

    But hey, you claim it makes you faster? And you claim you want to be bigger because that makes you faster? How does it make you faster?
    Quote Originally Posted by pedalbiker View Post
    So your extremely informed opinion is that I bulk up because that will help me ride faster?
    The first quote and your use of the term "bulk up" in this context tells me that you need to better acquaint yourself with the world of weight training which leads to my suspicion below.
    Ah, yes, "some" pros do a month or two of weight training during the offseason because it helps their riding so much.

    But the question has to be asked, why don't they do it year round?
    Better question to ask yourself is, why don't you give gym another try, this time do it right or hire the right trainer?

  25. #25
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    That's my actual data from my actual experience doing both, not just something I read on the internet and now feel compelled to argue about.

    And you?

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