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  1. #1
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    Books on Training for Track

    In the past, mountain bike racing has been my main discipline. I have a copy of Friel's The Mountain Biker's Training Bible, and while I don't know that the book magically improved my results, I think that if I managed to actually follow my plan, I'd do better. I'm at least getting better at designing and following plans too - this summer was maybe a little late, but I managed to figure out a realistic schedule, and (go figure) was able to follow it pretty well. So I'm hoping I can apply that starting early enough to have better volume and better compliance with my plan next year, and that it might make me faster.

    Because of some life stuff and the shrinking MTB XC scene in my state, I knew I wasn't going to compete off-road much this season and decided to try track. I had a lot of fun with it, and while I'm not sure if I'll be able to do it again next season, I'd like to at least set myself up for a strong season if I can.

    Is there another book on training that's going to fill in some of the information that's missing from my MTB book? Or do I just do the same plan and emphasize top end more? Do I use different form for weights? Keep lifting bigger weights later into my season? I'm especially curious to hear from anyone who has both The Mountain Biker's Training Bible and The Cyclist's Training Bible. If I didn't already have the first book, given that the second one is very popular and cited everywhere, I'd probably just buy it.

    Ultimately, I'd like to put together a plan and season that blends at least some mountain bike racing with track and maybe road if other racing opportunities are really thin. I figure I'll target all my speed work and anything I do with weights at track, keep doing my long rides on the MTB when I can, and let the chips fall where they may in terms of races.

  2. #2
    A wheelist
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    Hang around at fixedgearfever.com and ask questions. Ex world champions post there.
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    Mike The Bike's home wheelbuilding info - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder information and motivation.

    I'm not cranky; I just have a violent reaction to stupid people.

  3. #3
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    Mike's advice is sound; there is quite a bit of good info on FGF.

    No help here as far as a book recommendation, but....

    You'll be required to take some sort of intro class at your local velodrome before they'll let you race at their facility. During that training is a great time to ask about basic training advice from the people at the track. They'll be more than happy to get you started in the right direction.

    One very generic tip: start working on high-cadence. Drop down into a really small gear and over a 30-sec time frame, ramp up through 130 rpm, 150, 170, etc... leg speed is really important on the track.

    Remember that a vast majority of track races range in duration from 11seconds to 20min or so. That will indicate which 'energy systems' are necessary for track racing.

    good luck and have fun!
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  4. #4
    A wheelist
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustTooBig View Post
    No help here as far as a book recommendation, but....
    I don't know of any books either but parts of this might help Andrew -

    http://www.ridethetrack.com/pdf/trackracing_intro.pdf
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    Mike The Bike's home wheelbuilding info - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder information and motivation.

    I'm not cranky; I just have a violent reaction to stupid people.

  5. #5
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    I actually raced all summer at the velodrome. I made it into 4 (I realize that's not a huge deal, but not everybody gets that far) and managed to get an upgrade point or two toward the end of that.

    Along with racing smarter, I think I need to be stronger and faster. Don't we all?? My points in Cat. 4 were all from getting away with something before the stronger guys starting contesting them, or doing something really stupid and managing to get away with it because the stronger guys didn't feel like shutting me down. I don't plan to stop trying to get away with things, but I'd also like to be the stronger guys, not have to wait for them to have their backs turned to get points.

    My season's about to be over so I figure this is a great opportunity to plan for next season and start on the right foot. I like that Friel gives me everything I need to make a coherent training plan, although I pretty much sucked at following it last season. I think if I just follow Friel and make sure to at least be in build by the time track racing starts up, I should be in better shape than I was this year, but I've also heard that trackies do well to keep lifting weights all season while road and mountain bike racers my age (31) usually are better off just riding their bikes. I've run into recommendations of different lifts, and Friel implies that he's recommending different lifts in the MTB book I have than he might in his road-oriented books. I can't help thinking that if I start from the perspective of training for track and then do a ride or two a week on my mountain bike to keep from losing my handling skills (and because I enjoy mountain biking, of course,) I'll be better off than if I start from the MTB book I have and then spend more time lifting weights and do intervals at high cadence.

  6. #6
    A wheelist
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    Have a look at (ex world champ) Gord's Corner at the FCV site -

    Forest City Velodrome
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    Mike The Bike's home wheelbuilding info - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder information and motivation.

    I'm not cranky; I just have a violent reaction to stupid people.

  7. #7
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    Sherpa doesn't seem to frequent this forum, but races/raced the track professionally. He seemed to always have good advice.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T. View Post
    Have a look at (ex world champ) Gord's Corner at the FCV site -

    Forest City Velodrome
    I poked through some just now. I'll have to give it a closer read when I have a little more time. Looks like the full-year program is "some assembly required," but I bet I can get a lot of good information out of it.

    Thanks!

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