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  1. #1
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    Carmichael Training System Videos

    I've done a couple of Spinnerval DVDs (I use a spin bike at my gym), and found them to be OK, though with some misinformation. One thing I did like about it was they did address the needs of being on a spin bike, they didn't just talk about big chain ring little cog etc... Was wondering if anyone has used the CTS videos and if they accomodate the spin bike user as well. Thanks!!!

  2. #2
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    Having never been on a spin bike what exactly would disqualify the videos for spin bike users?

    Don't all these videos just give some sort of variable routine to follow along to?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwayne Barry
    Having never been on a spin bike what exactly would disqualify the videos for spin bike users?

    Don't all these videos just give some sort of variable routine to follow along to?
    It is preferrable to know what tension (as opposed to gear) to set on the spin bike. By way of example, Spinnervals uses a 1 to 5 system (not enough variance in my opinion) for spin bike tension.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LyncStar
    It is preferrable to know what tension (as opposed to gear) to set on the spin bike. By way of example, Spinnervals uses a 1 to 5 system (not enough variance in my opinion) for spin bike tension.
    Well just make it up so that it correlates with the gearing suggestions. There can't be anything too specific about the workout. The same gear for different riders is going to be placing different demands on them. For example a gear that Armstrong uses for a good aerobic pace might be a sprint gear for a relatively weak rider. Not to mention the same gear on different trainers is going to require widely varying amounts of power at the same cadence, hence one persons hard effort could be another's recovery effort.

    So you could just pick a tension that gives you the effort the video is going after even if they don't specify the tension (e.g., recovery, sprint, max 1 minute, max sustainable pace, whatever).

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwayne Barry
    There can't be anything too specific about the workout. The same gear for different riders is going to be placing different demands on them. For example a gear that Armstrong uses for a good aerobic pace might be a sprint gear for a relatively weak rider.
    I agree with the logic, but the experience I had with the CTS Time Trialing DVD was not quite that specific in regards to what Armstong uses. It's obvious that the athletes in the videos are Cat 1/Ironman class in their abilities, but the instructions they give are bikes-on-trainers specific. I would guess that finding the appropriate setting on spin bikes with these videos would be difficult. They give vague font chainring/rear cog suggestions, but most of what they descirbe is based on intensity (which can be very subjective).

    If you like European cycling, I suggest picking up a copy of a Tour de France video, or a Tour of Flanders edition. I love to sweat to those - I've noticed that my intensity always rises with the action.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by thelastbard
    I agree with the logic, but the experience I had with the CTS Time Trialing DVD was not quite that specific in regards to what Armstong uses. It's obvious that the athletes in the videos are Cat 1/Ironman class in their abilities, but the instructions they give are bikes-on-trainers specific. I would guess that finding the appropriate setting on spin bikes with these videos would be difficult. They give vague font chainring/rear cog suggestions, but most of what they descirbe is based on intensity (which can be very subjective).

    If you like European cycling, I suggest picking up a copy of a Tour de France video, or a Tour of Flanders edition. I love to sweat to those - I've noticed that my intensity always rises with the action.
    I'm pretty sure the CTS videos are based on either FTP or LT heartrate. If you're using a HRM or Power meter then that should be plenty information whether you're on a spin bike or a trainer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by raptor3x
    I'm pretty sure the CTS videos are based on either FTP or LT heartrate. If you're using a HRM or Power meter then that should be plenty information whether you're on a spin bike or a trainer.
    They use LT and RPE. What's frustrating about one of the ones I have (Power Intervals), is he has 6 three minute power intervals, but he tells you to be at a 10 RPE for the entire three minutes. I thought that was pretty much impossible to maintain a truly all out maximum effort for three minutes. I thought like 30 seconds to a minute was pretty much the max. Thoughts?

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    Quote Originally Posted by LyncStar
    I thought like 30 seconds to a minute was pretty much the max. Thoughts?
    More like a few seconds, then power declines quite rapidly.

    If you can access the pdf of this article from here:

    http://www.springerlink.com/content/lb23xvadfhvechye/


    look at fig. 1 and you can see how rapidly power declines during a maximum effort.

    At around 3 seconds the rider is at >20 watts/kg, by 30 seconds down to only around 7 watts/kg.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwayne Barry
    More like a few seconds, then power declines quite rapidly.

    If you can access the pdf of this article from here:

    http://www.springerlink.com/content/lb23xvadfhvechye/


    look at fig. 1 and you can see how rapidly power declines during a maximum effort.

    At around 3 seconds the rider is at >20 watts/kg, by 30 seconds down to only around 7 watts/kg.
    What should you be at for a set of six three minute intervals then? Slightly over LT? Oh yeah, there are three minute recoveries after each interval. HOw did Charmichael get this so wrong?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyncStar
    What should you be at for a set of six three minute intervals then? Slightly over LT? Oh yeah, there are three minute recoveries after each interval. HOw did Charmichael get this so wrong?

    He may simply mean give a maximum effort for those three minutes which should put you well over your LT. Often maximum effort intervals of a few minutes duration are called "VO2max" intervals b/c it takes a couple of minutes to hit your maximum VO2 consumption but anything much longer then that and you won't be able to sustain the effort, hence most riders LT, which usually correlates reasonably well with the power you can maintain for a prolonged period of time, is somewhere around 90% of their VO2max.

    So if the goal is to do a LT interval for 3 minutes, I think an RPE of 8 or 9 (on scale of 10)would be sufficient. An RPE of 10 for 3 minutes would probably be above LT.

    Carmichael is an ex-bike rider, friend of Lance, and marketing guy. Assuming he designed the workout on the video, it wouldn't be the first time he's said something that is physiologically out of sorts.

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