Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 39
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5,555

    Cycleops indoor cycle 400, 410

    Anyone have any experience with this system? Input would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    28
    I love the idea of a dedicated indoor cycle that doesn't tie up my road bike, but in the end it would probably be cheaper to get a $500 used bike just for the trainer and buy a Wahoo Kickr....

    First look at Wahoo Fitness KICKR ANT+/Bluetooth Smart Trainer with power meter | DC Rainmaker

    Chuck

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    13
    I had the 300 PT version. It was nice for a season, but I eventually went back to using my bike.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: serious's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    2,746
    I have the CycleOps 300 Pro. The only difference between it and the 400 Pro is the fact that on the 400 Pro the resistance is controlled electronically via the Joule 3.0 bike computer. Everything else is the same.

    The electronic control is essential for use with the Virtual Training system, since it will allow automatic control of the resistance as the terrain features change in the Virtual Training system. Frankly I think it is an amazing system, and have some regrets for not going for the 400 Pro. But in Canada the 300 Pro is already very expensive, while the 400 Pro with the Virtual Training system borders on the ridiculous.

    Regarding the machine, I absolutely love it. It is well built, stable and the freewheel system provides a very realistic ride feeling. The manual resistance control is really sensitive and you can jump 100 Watts with ˝ turn. Once you get used to it, it is excellent. I am not sure how quick the 400 Pro is, since you change the power in 10 Watt increments with the Joule computer (using a joystick). Some complain that resistance increases initially as the “brake pad” heats up, but that is normal for any spin bike. Of course, this is where the 400 Pro shines, since it adjusts automatically to your target power.

    CycleOps has free software (Power Agent) that you can use to download activities from the Joule computer and/or create workouts complete with segments of varying duration and power. In the 300 Pro such workouts still require that you manually set the power you want for each segment. In the 400 Pro, the Joule computer will automatically set the target power for each segment. It is an excellent way to do intervals either way. Nevertheless, Power Agent is not a very polished piece of software. While it does provide excellent data and graphs, including with TSS and IF scores, it does not graph TSS over a period of time, hence any ATL, CTL data is not readily available. On the other hand you can load all riding data to TrainingPeaks, MapMyride, Strava, etc. so you can use other software as well.

    Overall, I love my 300 Pro, and for me it is superior to a trainer (I have the 1UP USA trainer, btw) and rollers as well. But I love the solid, stable feel of spin bikes in general. Make sure you love spin bikes before investing in the CycleOps system.
    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SL singlespeed
    GF Superfly 29er HT
    S-Works Roubaix SL3 Dura Ace
    Pake French 75 track

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5,555
    I really appreciate the input.

    I sprung for the 410 (400 with virtual training) and so far really like it (2 rides only). The software is a bit difficult initially but really well thought out and support is really good but long waits. I've had a little trouble with the video but they've straightened me out. I've been using the impressive but less spectacular google earth stuff to date.

    These virtual training files with video are huge (upwards of a gig) and take some time to download. Tomorrow I'll ride both the flagstaff climb and the Kona Queen K (for the first time in video). I'm excited to see how well it works. Even the google earth version makes the rides seem far less tedious than my rollers. The quality of the bike is the best I've seen.

    I'll have more of a sense of the software in a couple of days.

    Quote Originally Posted by serious View Post
    I have the CycleOps 300 Pro. The only difference between it and the 400 Pro is the fact that on the 400 Pro the resistance is controlled electronically via the Joule 3.0 bike computer. Everything else is the same.

    The electronic control is essential for use with the Virtual Training system, since it will allow automatic control of the resistance as the terrain features change in the Virtual Training system. Frankly I think it is an amazing system, and have some regrets for not going for the 400 Pro. But in Canada the 300 Pro is already very expensive, while the 400 Pro with the Virtual Training system borders on the ridiculous.

    Regarding the machine, I absolutely love it. It is well built, stable and the freewheel system provides a very realistic ride feeling. The manual resistance control is really sensitive and you can jump 100 Watts with ˝ turn. Once you get used to it, it is excellent. I am not sure how quick the 400 Pro is, since you change the power in 10 Watt increments with the Joule computer (using a joystick). Some complain that resistance increases initially as the “brake pad” heats up, but that is normal for any spin bike. Of course, this is where the 400 Pro shines, since it adjusts automatically to your target power.

    CycleOps has free software (Power Agent) that you can use to download activities from the Joule computer and/or create workouts complete with segments of varying duration and power. In the 300 Pro such workouts still require that you manually set the power you want for each segment. In the 400 Pro, the Joule computer will automatically set the target power for each segment. It is an excellent way to do intervals either way. Nevertheless, Power Agent is not a very polished piece of software. While it does provide excellent data and graphs, including with TSS and IF scores, it does not graph TSS over a period of time, hence any ATL, CTL data is not readily available. On the other hand you can load all riding data to TrainingPeaks, MapMyride, Strava, etc. so you can use other software as well.

    Overall, I love my 300 Pro, and for me it is superior to a trainer (I have the 1UP USA trainer, btw) and rollers as well. But I love the solid, stable feel of spin bikes in general. Make sure you love spin bikes before investing in the CycleOps system.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    334
    Congrats... I have a 300 and like it much better than beating the crap out of my expensive road bike on a trainer. It's much more stable when doing serious intervals.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5,555
    Quote Originally Posted by SwiftSolo View Post
    Anyone have any experience with this system? Input would be appreciated.
    I did my first virtual ride with video today (the Kona K) on my cycleops 400. It is amazing how easy it is to stay motivated--something my rollers have failed to do unless a specific goal was imminent. This even though this ride goes through a massive straight line hilly wasteland with virtually nothing that could be called scenery.

    On this particular ride the video was about 50 yards ahead of the gps and topo so I had to anticipate and downshift a bit early or really suffer. You have to shift one gear at a time. You actually input the gear combinations from your bike but have no ability to dump a bunch by shifting into or out of the large/small ring.

    I am currently downloading the Alpes d'Huez (2.4GB) to attempt tomorrow. I rather doubt that my current conditioning will take me to the top but I'll be able to see progress with ongoing attempts. I'll use about 15k of the Kona K for warm up as it looks like the d'Huez ride starts climbing seriously nearly from the beginning.

    My point in posting all of this is partially motivated by developing some other 400 riding partners of similar age to race against. Unlike comparing times of outdoor rides, there is no rain or wind to impact results.

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    9,234
    Curious what the responses are. I would love to get this. The idea of it replicating your real rides is beyond cool.

    Plus my wife could use it too.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: serious's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    2,746
    Oh boy, it sounds like I should have gone for the 400 Pro and Virtual Training. I am happy enough with the 300 Pro but i can also imagine how cool the 400 with virtual training can be.
    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SL singlespeed
    GF Superfly 29er HT
    S-Works Roubaix SL3 Dura Ace
    Pake French 75 track

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5,555

    Update of the cycleops410

    Quote Originally Posted by SwiftSolo View Post
    Anyone have any experience with this system? Input would be appreciated.
    This thing is unbelievably motivating and well thought out. I've downloaded my regular training rides from my garmin (no video) and the trainer shows your progress in the google earth view and duplicates every important element of the ride. I find that the hill climbs are accurate in that I end up using the same gears and experience a minor reduction in the wattage indicated that I generate on the same hills. It is amazingly accurate.

    You do need to keep this thing where the room temp can be dropped low and you'll likely need fans if above 60f (I have a heated garage that I turn off the heat and open both the large and small doors about a half hour early). Even then, you will work harder and generate more heat than ever before as you attempt to beat your best effort to date on any particular ride.

    The video rides are more interesting / motivating and I will be videoing my regular winter rides on the first couple of sunny days.

    I've attempted the Alpe d'Huez video ride a couple of times and failed as it is far too difficult for my current condition. I'll try it again soon as I added a fake lower gear (lower than anything on my road bike). I was able to do some (editing/ smoothing) that should reduce a 17% section that kicks my ass only a couple of k into the ride. It should now show up as about 13% but for a longer distance. I point this out because these two options should allow anyone who is reasonably fit to modify rides enough and cheat with bogus lower gears and "smoothing" until fitness allows unadulterated success. You can easily add and remove gears but you'll want to duplicate your bike for typical training rides.

    The entire system requires some patience setting up and learning how to navigate through the software. It is expensive but beats the hell out of having training stuff that becomes drudgery after a few days. The shifting is done by a joy stick on the meter and is convenient but not as convenient as it could be if placed in the normal position. I find it pretty hard in the middle of a really tough section to both stand up and simultaneously grab lower gears because I have to take my right hand off of the hood.

    In the end, these guys have developed a really high quality indoor cycle and the software is amazing. Technical support is a bit slow (and non-existent after hours and weekends) but it is high quality. It's best to leave your call back number. Email works also if it is a minor issue.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5,555
    Update:
    Cycleops virtual training has added some great features just a couple of days ago. One was the virtual partner (a real virtual partner verses the speed specific partner in Garmin) I can either ride against myself showing my last ride up a particular route or I can download any other riders relative position if they have ridden my rides.

    It is a real motivation to have that other rider (you on your last ride) right on your ass all the way up the mountain. There is a strong incentive to keep him from passing. Even without the video, the high quality google earth mode keeps you in touch and anticipating changes in grade before you get there. Another new feature shows a moving graph of upcoming terrain changes to help anticipate terrain changes right before they happen. This is important because the 400 does not shift as fast as your outdoor bike and you really pay the price if you are too slow when shifting into lower gears.

    I've had a few problems with the Joule 3 power meter / controller with shifting. Cycleops has been very cooperative with a rapid replacement and they have been great in helping me deal with this friggen windows 8 that regrettably came on my new laptop.

    Today we finally have nice weather and I will do / produce my first video filming ride. It is one of my winter training rides (my summer rides are all snowed in). It will be fun to see if the actual ground level visuals on a known ride make it even more motivating (on the next rainy cold day)

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    334
    That sound really awesome. I wish Cycleops offered an upgrade kit for those of us who bought the 300 series a few years ago before this virtual trainer existed.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: serious's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    2,746
    Quote Originally Posted by Doc_D View Post
    That sound really awesome. I wish Cycleops offered an upgrade kit for those of us who bought the 300 series a few years ago before this virtual trainer existed.
    I agree. I have to believe that with proper instructions, it should be feasible to convert, but who knows. Maybe it is not as easy as one would expect.
    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SL singlespeed
    GF Superfly 29er HT
    S-Works Roubaix SL3 Dura Ace
    Pake French 75 track

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    12
    The 410 sounds like a fantastic bike, but I'm a little concerned about the software complexity. Can I ride it without the virtual aspect too? on some manual mode where i can control the resistance. Maybe even an occasional ride where I don't monitor anything at all?

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5,555
    You can without any computer connection other than the joule cycle computer. The shifting joy stick acts as a resistance controller when it is used that way. Given the option, I can't imagine wanting to do that however.

    Do remember that you have to choose either the "race" or "virtual partner" option instead of the "training" option when you actually want to race.
    Quote Originally Posted by lhs2miler View Post
    The 410 sounds like a fantastic bike, but I'm a little concerned about the software complexity. Can I ride it without the virtual aspect too? on some manual mode where i can control the resistance. Maybe even an occasional ride where I don't monitor anything at all?

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1

    setup

    I'm curious to how you guys have the hardware and software setup?

    Are you running off a desktop and then looking at it through a Computer monitor or to a TV?

    Currently my trainer setup is a 40" Bravia LCD TV in the garage with a DVD player where I just throw in an old tour DVD and away I go. If I could get away with simply picking up a stand alone desktop I might pull the trigger sooner than later. I have no desire to go from 40" at distance to huddling close to a 23"..

    Thanks for the advice.

  17. #17
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    12

    Video in sync?

    Swiftsolo - thanks for your reply. Another question - is it generally in sync? That is, the video / hills and the resistance?

    thanks again,
    bill

  18. #18
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5,555
    I have my computer in my office and have run a HDMI and 2 usb cables to my garage where I use my indoor cycle and virtual training. The large tv screen is nice and the cool garage (with a large fan) is pretty important (for me).
    Quote Originally Posted by bbonifac View Post
    I'm curious to how you guys have the hardware and software setup?

    Are you running off a desktop and then looking at it through a Computer monitor or to a TV?

    Currently my trainer setup is a 40" Bravia LCD TV in the garage with a DVD player where I just throw in an old tour DVD and away I go. If I could get away with simply picking up a stand alone desktop I might pull the trigger sooner than later. I have no desire to go from 40" at distance to huddling close to a 23"..

    Thanks for the advice.

  19. #19
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5,555
    It is very much in sync. Google Earth does have some small abnormalities in elevation (small terrain humps where none exists). If you "smooth" these humps with the software you will eliminate a lot of unnecessary shifting however that process tends to make climbs start just a bit earlier and last just a bit longer than reality.

    It would be great is we could choose to only smooth certain segments. The software is generally really accurate and what I've described would not be noticible on a ride that you have limited experience on. If you have a favorite training ride that you do endlessly and know every bump, you will notice the need to shift sometimes where that need does not exists in reality (unless you "smooth").

    Quote Originally Posted by lhs2miler View Post
    Swiftsolo - thanks for your reply. Another question - is it generally in sync? That is, the video / hills and the resistance?

    thanks again,
    bill

  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    12

    Setting up the 410 Pro

    So, I've already emailed customer support about this, but it's a weekend and maybe someone will reply here.

    I leaped for the 410 pro, and set it up this weekend. Unfortunately, I have no resistance whatsoever! I have synced the Joule with the indoor cycle, but i can't get any resistance on the thing. There's also a small rattle, that is likely related. It's brand new from clever training... any tips? What sensors am i supposed to be connected to?

    Thanks in advance for any help. You can email me at bylundb at yahoo dot cm and I'll reply with my cell if you're willing!

    Thanks a bunch!
    ~Billy

    Of smaller issues - the virtual training software is struggling with any Google 3D video, and there is no sound within any of the virtual training software....

    I hate electronics, but I'm hopeful this will be great once set up.

  21. #21
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5,555
    Do you have the bike plugged in? I knows this sounds obvious but it wasn't to me based on the instructions. The pin plug plugs in under the rear wheel just above the "v" stand.

  22. #22
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    12

    No luck....

    Quote Originally Posted by SwiftSolo View Post
    Do you have the bike plugged in? I knows this sounds obvious but it wasn't to me based on the instructions. The pin plug plugs in under the rear wheel just above the "v" stand.
    Plugged in, and yes, the instructions are poor on that.

    Did you have to adjust the flywheel at all? how close does the break pad sit to the wheel ? Mine is just barely touching....

  23. #23
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    12
    So i think i figured it out! You have to enter in a target power to provide resistance, right? I think it starts with target power of 0. It's too late for me to get sweaty now, I'll try first thing tomorrow.

    Does the break constantly make a little noise adjusting while you ride?

  24. #24
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5,555
    I've always used mine with virtual training and it adjusts the brake automatically according to the gradient.

    the good news is that while their support is only available during regular working hours, they are extremely good and will have you sorted out quickly.

    Good luck

  25. #25
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5,555
    lhs, did you get set up and going?
    I think you're going to really like this thing when you get going with virtual training. I find it interesting, fast and easy and I'll always prefer it when the weather is marginal. You do need a big fan even if it is in a cool garage.

    It did take a while to sort through some issues (mostly with windows 8).
    Quote Originally Posted by lhs2miler View Post
    So i think i figured it out! You have to enter in a target power to provide resistance, right? I think it starts with target power of 0. It's too late for me to get sweaty now, I'll try first thing tomorrow.

    Does the break constantly make a little noise adjusting while you ride?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Sea Otter Classic

Hot Deals

Contest


Latest RoadBike Articles


Latest Videos

RoadbikeReview on Facebook