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  1. #1
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    EP-NO Dietary Supplement Product

    Over the last few months I've seen lots of advertising in bike mags and web sites (including this one) from the makers of this product, which is billed as an all-natural dietary supplement (based on iron and beets) that is supposed to increase modestly the body's production of oxygen-carrying red blood cells.

    Has anybody out there been using this? Any feedback on this product, good or bad?

    Thanks.
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  2. #2
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    Supplements

    Here's the deal on supplements: Supplements' "claimed actions, efficiency, or potency have not been thoroughly investigated by controlled clinical studies and remain for the most part anecdotal." "athletes are targeted by the sport nutritional industry by very aggressive and efficient marketing, but for the vast majority of the products . . , the scientific proofs supporting their claims are not there. But the athletes believe: It is more on the side of faith than facts. One only listens to what he wants and becomes deaf, blind to all logical arguments."

    A recent German study analyzed 600 samples of nutritional supplements and found anabolic steroids in 20% at levels that could result in a positive dope test. None of these supplements were labeled as containing steroids. In the US, supplements are not tested or regulated, and need not be labeled as containing steroids. Add to this the fact that no good (controlled, double blind) studies have shown benefits of supplementation for athletes over a balanced diet. When an active person consumes a balanced diet, it is extremely easy to get the required nutritional components. This is because the high level of activity requires a large food intake, and so the nutrients come along automatically.

    Per Dr. Arnie Baker: It is often said that Americans have the most expensive urine in the world. Vitamin and mineral supplement sales are big business. Many athletes take scores of pills daily. Companies try to distinguish themselves from others by claiming that their formulations are superior. There is very little evidence that any supplements are worth it.

  3. #3
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    If it's based on Iron and beets, couldn't you just eat beets and food rich in iron?

  4. #4
    Every little counts...
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    Like Beets?

    I agree, it is Snake Oil. But I bet there are people lined up for this crap.

  5. #5
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    http://www.crnusa.org/shellnr062002.html
    http://ods.od.nih.gov/index.aspx
    You can obtain your RDAs through nutrition, just make sure the food items are fresh & organic, you don't cook the food items and pay attention to the required caloric quantities to obtain those RDAs.....(exceptions include lycopene)....

  6. #6
    The Wanderer
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    Quote Originally Posted by coonass
    You can obtain your RDAs through nutrition, just make sure the food items are fresh & organic, you don't cook the food items and pay attention to the required caloric quantities to obtain those RDAs.....(exceptions include lycopene)....
    Sounds easy enough...

    To inquire a little about what KI said...Aside from products that claim to give you the ultimate workout, 10X more energy than normal, leap tall buildings in a single bound, etc...What about a multi-vit as a dietary supplement? I know I don't eat right on a daily basis and rely on a vitamin to fill the void when I don't keep up with my diet. According to the good doctor "There is very little evidence that any supplements are worth it." Should I stop taking my vitamin, drinking those costly endurance drinks and eating powerbars and such while performing (I know water and natural foods can be effective, naturaly)? Am I taking this wrong, or can natural foods only supply what the body needs? If a company says if you drink (or eat) their product, you will be supplied with the Aminos/sodium/etc that your body needs during performance, should we not believe them just because there has been no double blind test to show that the product actually supplies the body with these nutrients? Even if the ingredents are listed on the label? If the supplemented nutrients are listed as ingredients, by default, isn't my body getting them once the supplement is consumed thus making the "supplement" effective? Maybe I'm in left field here...Somebody help me...
    Last edited by kyler2001; 07-28-2006 at 01:28 PM.
    And the eighth and final rule: if this is your first time at Bike Club, you have to race.

  7. #7
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    Nautral solutions

    There's nothing wrong with taking a daily multivitamin, but that is not a performance enhancing supplement. It may well be unnecessary, but it is pretty cheap insurance, and not much different than eating a fortified breakfast cereal. Most of the supplement business is about suggesting that somehow what they are offering is better than food, which is where the nonsense and ripoff prices come in. For an active cyclist, the extra calories required each day make it relatively easy to meet to get adequate nutrition by eating reasonably (not "supplementing" with chips, dip, Mountain Dew, and beef jerky). Things like energy drinks, gels, and bars are just expensive forms of food. There's nothing wrong with them, but they contain no miracles. As an example, one company's new "energy jello" blocks are 5X the price per calorie of Fig Newtons, and Fig Newtons are expensive cookies!

  8. #8
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    Determine your RDA menu requirements and caloric intake of natural foods from the USDA database and establish your daily (uncooked) menu:

    http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/index.html
    http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/qa-nut8.html
    http://www.mendosa.com/gilists.htm

    Too much work? Now you see why I choose supplementation and somewhat healthy eating habits (I have red meat about 1/year and avoid fried foods like the plague(; I spend money on supplements because I don't have the '3 squares' per day and I definitely wasted money (& health) on the 23yrs of smoking in the past...btw: I haven't smoked since 1980 and so far haven't experienced any adverse health effects from that part of my life... my mental status is unquestionable according to my 2 ex-wives
    Are supplements going to make me a better athlete... Heck NO!!....no more so than having a 1# bike, carbon sole shoes and an Atmos helmet will have Phonak calling me for 'fill in for a vacant spot on their roster'...as Lance said: "It's not about the bike."

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