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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    So, Gold, do you have a power meter?
    Not yet. I would like to get one, but I have not made up my mind on which one to go with.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goldriverdude View Post
    I'm done with you. You are a waste of my time. I will burn calories on my bike not replying to douchebags like you.
    Yeah, I hate when science and facts get in the way of erroneous opinions, too.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Keep in mind the Team BMC info is for a Pro TdF racer requiring 6,000-9,000 calories a day.

    I'm kinda surprised as an A level rider that you'd require so much focus on eating for a 40-50mi group ride. That's less than 3hrs riding. It shouldn't require carb loading for several days prior. A decent dinner the night before, small breakfast the morning of and 100cal/hr while riding should be more than sufficient.
    I think you're right. I suspect I should go get a physical. I shouldn't be this depleted. Curious if I'm anemic or have an elevated WBC. Today, I'm starting to notice some mild flu-like symptoms (bit of post-nasal drip and slight GI symptoms).

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goldriverdude View Post
    I'm done with you. You are a waste of my time. I will burn calories on my bike not replying to douchebags like you.
    Dude, calm down and have a cookie.
    Too old to ride plastic

  5. #30
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    My opinion...whatever is happening at 40 miles has little to do with "nutrition" and everything to do with general fitness. Some really untrained riders can hang for 20-30 miles on a fast punchy ride but, by mile 60, 70, 80+ most drop off. You can nail nutrition yet that doesn't mean you will be able to hit the same power metrics when getting fatigued as you were when fresh. For example it's always interesting to watch how HR rises as power stays the same say at threshold. After 30 or 40 minutes if untrained your HR (mine too) may rise unsustainably too high...Any little acceleration from the group simply pushes your cardiovascular system too and you go into the red so-to-speak.

    I don't know if this is the case with you just that I don't think it's wise to focus on nutrition with out knowing if that is the issue.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodys737 View Post
    My opinion...whatever is happening at 40 miles has little to do with "nutrition" and everything to do with general fitness. Some really untrained riders can hang for 20-30 miles on a fast punchy ride but, by mile 60, 70, 80+ most drop off. You can nail nutrition yet that doesn't mean you will be able to hit the same power metrics when getting fatigued as you were when fresh. For example it's always interesting to watch how HR rises as power stays the same say at threshold. After 30 or 40 minutes if untrained your HR (mine too) may rise unsustainably too high...Any little acceleration from the group simply pushes your cardiovascular system too and you go into the red so-to-speak.

    I don't know if this is the case with you just that I don't think it's wise to focus on nutrition with out knowing if that is the issue.
    Very good point and something I should consider. Perhaps it's more training, time on the trainer, in combination with nutrition. I really don't know. Part of me thinks I should get a coach or at least some guidance from someone with more experience than me. My goals are not unreasonable- I just want to have better endurance for longer rides. I'm not competing, so it's just about sustaining longer distances.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by skhan007 View Post
    My goals are not unreasonable- I just want to have better endurance for longer rides. I'm not competing, so it's just about sustaining longer distances.
    Maybe you're just not conditioned for longer rides? How often do you ride over 40mi?
    If you're not conditioned for longer rides, no amount or type of food is going to help.


    Quote Originally Posted by woodys737 View Post
    My opinion...whatever is happening at 40 miles has little to do with "nutrition" and everything to do with general fitness. Some really untrained riders can hang for 20-30 miles on a fast punchy ride but, by mile 60, 70, 80+ most drop off.
    I ride with some guys whom most of their riding is in the 30-40mi range. They're really fast and at that distance I struggle to keep up with them. But when the rides get over 50mi it's opposite. I can still maintain my power level while they start to struggle to keep up or drop off.
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  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Maybe you're just not conditioned for longer rides? How often do you ride over 40mi?
    If you're not conditioned for longer rides, no amount or type of food is going to help.


    I ride with some guys whom most of their riding is in the 30-40mi range. They're really fast and at that distance I struggle to keep up with them. But when the rides get over 50mi it's opposite. I can still maintain my power level while they start to struggle to keep up or drop off.
    Agreed- I need to figure out how to condition myself for longer rides (which only occur 1-2 x/week). I feel like I'm similar to the guys you described that start to run out of steam as the rides get longer.

  9. #34
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    Yes, one needs to train for longer rides by doing even longer rides!
    And I very my food, at least once a month I do a longer ride with little nutrition, slower and easier. Kinda gets one used to riding on low food situations.
    Otherwise I eat on all training rides over 1 hour.
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  10. #35
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    Yeah, you just need to ride longer to ride longer. I was riding 60\70 miles easy but the last few months I've been busy around the house and only have been getting out for 30\35 miles, when I can, and I get to struggling as I get nearer to 40 miles.

    Once I get done around here I'll be able to get out for longer rides, and my legs will come back quickly.
    Too old to ride plastic

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by skhan007 View Post
    Hi Gang- Hoping to get some advice and guidance: I'm noting that AM rides are always tougher and I tend to bonk. PM rides, including fast-paced A-rides at the LBS are fine and I think it's the fueling during the day that makes evening rides so much better.

    I'm not sure what I should be doing, but for AM rides, I generally eat breakfast along the lines of a bowl of oatmeal and some fruit. I take a long an energy gel and some Lara Bars, but at about 40 miles out, I'm bonking. The same ride in the PM is generally no problem and I often feel like I have energy to spare on those PM rides. If it helps, I'm 6'1" and about 163-165 lbs. Hoping to get some guidance on how to beat the bonk and do better on AM rides, via nutrition adjustments. Cheers!
    Hi there. You are a big guy. Tall and skinny. I am 5'11 192 lbs racing weight. I had the same problem. I spoke to some pro riders from the group and this is what they taught me.
    The night before you have to load up. It depends on the intensity and distance of the ride. My ride was 1.5 hrs race pace with the bridge , 25-26 mph average and then endurance pace 18-20mph. Total ride time 4-5 hours average speed 20mph.
    The night before if you are going for the longest you need fat. Fat will be stored as triglycerides on muscle for the long distance/endurance fuel.
    You will need carbs too. For the glycogen needed for the sprints and breakaways. In other words anaerobic activity/hard efforts. You don't need a lot of protein unless you worked out hard the day before and need muscle repair. that wouldn't be advisable. They day before the ride you need to do recovery ride or short ride with short intensity. It all depends on how your body reacts to loads and what you feel works the best for you.
    The morning of the ride you need easy fuel access. Carbs and some protein and not too many fats. Fats slow digestion and you want quick access fuel(glucose). The protein will help initial muscle breakdown recovery (early in the ride) but nothing drastic since you wouldn't be hurting from the day before. After the hammer fest is done you need to eat protein mainly for repair on the fly, carbs, and some fat. Don't eat too much fat because it slows down the digestion. For me an egg sandwich was the answer. Or a chicken empanada. Nothing fatty. Main here is protein and carbs.
    Usually if you are not an endurance cross country rider(80+miles) per day, you don't rely heavily on fat metabolism.
    After the ride you need to have a nice meal. drink a beer(carbs maybe 2) and get some protein and fats and take a nice nap
    Next day get up and do the same. This is what worked for me after bunking so many times. I did this hammer rides Saturday and Sunday. 80-100 miles each day. This never failed me. Understand that this is for a rider putting 15+ hours a week around 250-300 miles per week.
    I hope this helps. Good luck.


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  12. #37
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    Sorry I didn't mention fueling while riding. I couldn't do it unless I was doing 100-150 miles in a sit. Again if you want to do it. Keep fats to a minimum. Eat carbs and protein. Your body has enough fat storages for a good 100 mile ride once a week.


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  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    Yes, one needs to train for longer rides by doing even longer rides!
    And I very my food, at least once a month I do a longer ride with little nutrition, slower and easier. Kinda gets one used to riding on low food situations.
    Otherwise I eat on all training rides over 1 hour.
    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Yeah, you just need to ride longer to ride longer. I was riding 60\70 miles easy but the last few months I've been busy around the house and only have been getting out for 30\35 miles, when I can, and I get to struggling as I get nearer to 40 miles.

    Once I get done around here I'll be able to get out for longer rides, and my legs will come back quickly.
    Quote Originally Posted by charlitin View Post
    Hi there. You are a big guy. Tall and skinny. I am 5'11 192 lbs racing weight. I had the same problem. I spoke to some pro riders from the group and this is what they taught me.
    The night before you have to load up. It depends on the intensity and distance of the ride. My ride was 1.5 hrs race pace with the bridge , 25-26 mph average and then endurance pace 18-20mph. Total ride time 4-5 hours average speed 20mph.
    The night before if you are going for the longest you need fat. Fat will be stored as triglycerides on muscle for the long distance/endurance fuel.
    You will need carbs too. For the glycogen needed for the sprints and breakaways. In other words anaerobic activity/hard efforts. You don't need a lot of protein unless you worked out hard the day before and need muscle repair. that wouldn't be advisable. They day before the ride you need to do recovery ride or short ride with short intensity. It all depends on how your body reacts to loads and what you feel works the best for you.
    The morning of the ride you need easy fuel access. Carbs and some protein and not too many fats. Fats slow digestion and you want quick access fuel(glucose). The protein will help initial muscle breakdown recovery (early in the ride) but nothing drastic since you wouldn't be hurting from the day before. After the hammer fest is done you need to eat protein mainly for repair on the fly, carbs, and some fat. Don't eat too much fat because it slows down the digestion. For me an egg sandwich was the answer. Or a chicken empanada. Nothing fatty. Main here is protein and carbs.
    Usually if you are not an endurance cross country rider(80+miles) per day, you don't rely heavily on fat metabolism.
    After the ride you need to have a nice meal. drink a beer(carbs maybe 2) and get some protein and fats and take a nice nap
    Next day get up and do the same. This is what worked for me after bunking so many times. I did this hammer rides Saturday and Sunday. 80-100 miles each day. This never failed me. Understand that this is for a rider putting 15+ hours a week around 250-300 miles per week.
    I hope this helps. Good luck.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Thanks guys, I really appreciate it! I went out today on a 40+ mile group ride with a local bike club. This was my first outing with this group who were a great bunch of guys and gals. The funny part is the B riders were averaging about 20+ Mph and the A riders were even faster! I could only hang with the B group for about an hour, before recognizing that I would be dropped. I decided to ride solo and complete the ride on my own, rather than burn out trying to keep up. I will keep going back to this ride, as I think it's a great way for me to practice, build endurance, etc. I did all the proper nutritional pre-ride planning, which seemed to serve me well. I think the bottom line is that I need to train more.

  14. #39
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    Whole Foods apple cinnamon oatmeal with some Grape Nuts cereal mixed in for long rides, over 3 hours. A few pieces of toast with butter or peanut butter for shorter rides.

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