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  1. #1
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    Ross book and high intensity intervals

    Michael J. Ross’ book “Maximum Performance for Cyclists” outlines an intriguing plan for high intensity intervals.

    First, he has you conduct a “modified Conconi test” by starting at 60 watts and increasing by 10 watts every minute until you can no longer hold the wattage. The highest power output is your “critical power”. This definition differs from Friel, BTW.

    Then you conduct a test to determine your max time at critical power or “Tmax”. You are supposed to do three days of high intensity intervals at critical power and increase the interval length by 10% each day, starting at 50% Tmax. You increase the power by 10% and start over at 50% Tmax for the next block of intervals.

    Anybody have experience determining “critical power” using Ross’ method? It sounds like there are a lot of variables at play that could influence such a long running test, but what do I know? Is this a widely accepted test? I can’t seem to find much info on Google.

    Also, increasing power by 10% weekly seems like a big jump. Thoughts?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by tsvaughn
    Anybody have experience determining “critical power” using Ross’ method? It sounds like there are a lot of variables at play that could influence such a long running test, but what do I know? Is this a widely accepted test? I can’t seem to find much info on Google.
    I believe in the exercise physiology world critical power is defined as the asymptote of the hyperbolic power-duration relationship. I would think the reasonable way to determine CP would be to plot your maximum power numbers for given durations and see where the asymptote lies. I have no idea if Ross' method of determining CP would correspond to the exercise phyiologists' definition or not.
    I have a review article of CP somewhere, I will try to find it.

    edit: This might be a great question for the wattage forum folks.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwayne Barry
    I believe in the exercise physiology world critical power is defined as the asymptote of the hyperbolic power-duration relationship. I would think the reasonable way to determine CP would be to plot your maximum power numbers for given durations and see where the asymptote lies. I have no idea if Ross' method of determining CP would correspond to the exercise phyiologists' definition or not.
    I have a review article of CP somewhere, I will try to find it.

    edit: This might be a great question for the wattage forum folks.
    This might be the article you're thinking of http://www.velo-fit.com/articles/critical-power.pdf Note it's possible to determine critical power with a few shorter duration interval tests. It's easier to get a good estimate of a slope than an asymptote.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by asgelle
    This might be the article you're thinking of http://www.velo-fit.com/articles/critical-power.pdf Note it's possible to determine critical power with a few shorter duration interval tests. It's easier to get a good estimate of a slope than an asymptote.

    That's not what I was thinking of but nonetheless informative. If anyone is interested in the critical power concept go to pubmed and search using "critical power exercise". There is a 2006 review article by Morton and i saw an abstract about determining CP from a single ramped test.

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