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  1. #1
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    Shop scratched new bike. What to do:(

    I just saw my assembled bike today at my Lbs. I have yet to be fitted. Upon inspection of the new beauty, I noticed "scratches" on the seat stay, one side. They are noticeable. I haven't picked it up yet, just looked at it. What should I do? What should I expect?

    Burbonmonk

  2. #2
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    I would ask them about it to see what they say. I think you have to decide ahead of time if you would like to have a discount for the scratches or want a different bike. Is this a bike that you ordered from the manufactuer and the LBS is assembling? Personally, I'm with you. A new bike should be in a new condition. Small mistakes happen but noticable mistakes should be corrected to your satisfaction.

    When I had my new bike built, I menetioned to the manager of the shop that I saw a bike just like the one I was ordering with a large scuff and the top tube and how disappointed I would be if mine had a ding like that. I mentioned it to emphasize build quality and in the end, they did a great job.

  3. #3
    Resident Curmudgeon
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    I would definitely say something. Not in an angry way, but assertive. If you just let it go and say or do nothing, you'll be angry at yourself later. If a discount would satisfy you, ask for it. If you'd rather have a different bike, ask for that. If they can repair it to your satisfaction, ask them to do that.
    Before you criticize someone walk a mile in their shoes. That way when you criticize them you'll be a mile away & you'll have their shoes.

  4. #4
    fine figure of a man
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    the key word is noticable

    small stuff is going to happen. A tiny hidden scratch would be one thing...let's face it, you're going to put that kind of scratch on the bike w/ in the first 100 miles anyway. No question about it, if this thing is noticable than do whatever it takes to make it right. Its always good to keep a good relationship w/ the guys at the LBS, but not at the cost of your satisfaction with your ride. Be as diplomatic as possible and make sure that you are geting something you are going to be nothing but happy with.

  5. #5
    fine figure of a man
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    and i bet you thought an english major would spell noticeable correctly.

  6. #6
    tofurkey hunting
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    Quote Originally Posted by meathead
    and i bet you thought an english major would spell noticeable correctly.
    and use then/than correctly

    -ampastoral (your friendly neighborhood english professor who tells people that he is too concerned with the larger importance of ideas to quibble over the mere order of letters)

    to the op: definitely be diplomatic. my thinking is that if i'm not assembling my own bike, i have to be fine with a scratch or two. but ultimately, you need to be satisfied with your purchace and go with your gut. only you can decide what is "significant".
    i know i painted you a prettier picture, baby...my fiction beats the hell out of my truth

  7. #7
    Team American Classic
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    My rule is this....if I paid for it "new", I expect it to be "new" and that means no scratches on it. Otherwise, cut me a deal to take it with the scratches. With as much as some of our toys cost, we should be able to expect it to be in excellent condition. I'm pretty sure the LBS will work you a deal on it. Or you could take your business elsewhere....

  8. #8
    Squirrel Hunter
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    Multiple Options

    1) Buy titanium (just kidding).

    2) Learn to wrench yourself and do all your own builds and maintenance (I am somewhat serious about this one). Bikes are really not that complicated. If the mechanic lacked the attention to detail and scratched your bike then what else did he do a half axx job at? Do you have confidence in the quality of the build?

    3) Treat your bike as a tool and ignore it. Yes, ask for a discount or better yet for some free stuff off the floor. You will get more bang for the buck by rounding out your discount with stuff from inventory.

    4) Tell them you want a "new" bike. You ordered new and expect new. You do not want to find yourself thinking about that scratch every time you throw your leg over the top tube for a ride. Some folks can be really anal about their equipment and there is nothing wrong with that if that is your personality and you are paying the bill. They can put the scratched bike on the floor and sell it to someone who will not notice or scam someone on e-bay with some creative photos.

    If the bike shop hesitates about option 3 or 4 ask them if it would be OK for you to stop over at the owners house and key his wifes car. Not a big scratch, just a small one like on your "new" bike, somewhere noticeable where she will see it everytime she drives her car.
    Luck is the intersection of preparation and opportunity.

  9. #9
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    Depending on how bad it is I would expect that the scratch will disappear with some buffing compound and a good coat of wax and may be gone when you go to pick up the bike. I've gotten rid of scratches in the clear coat on my bikes this way. Whatever you do make sure you're completely happy with the bike when you pick it up or it will bug you as long as you have it.

  10. #10
    Resident Curmudgeon
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Flash
    My rule is this....if I paid for it "new", I expect it to be "new" and that means no scratches on it. Otherwise, cut me a deal to take it with the scratches. With as much as some of our toys cost, we should be able to expect it to be in excellent condition. I'm pretty sure the LBS will work you a deal on it. Or you could take your business elsewhere....
    I agree. In this age of..."$3000 bikes are no big deal anymore", I'd like it to be good. I know how I'd feel if I bought a new car and found a scratch on it. I also agree on being nice, diplomatic, but also firm and assertive. You're paying your hard earned $$. You deserve to have what you purchase to be unflawed.
    Before you criticize someone walk a mile in their shoes. That way when you criticize them you'll be a mile away & you'll have their shoes.

  11. #11
    fine figure of a man
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    Quote Originally Posted by ampastoral
    and use then/than correctly

    -ampastoral (your friendly neighborhood english professor who tells people that he is too concerned with the larger importance of ideas to quibble over the mere order of letters)
    thanks...tool

  12. #12
    Self-Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keeping up with Junior
    Learn to wrench yourself and do all your own builds and maintenance (I am somewhat serious about this one). Bikes are really not that complicated. If the mechanic lacked the attention to detail and scratched your bike then what else did he do a half axx job at? Do you have confidence in the quality of the build?

    I wholeheartedly agree with this point. I've been building/wrenching my own bikes since I was about 13 so it's nothing that should intimidate a grown man.

  13. #13
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    I can't find it online, but one of the Rivendell Reader tips for better living, among 50-100 in an article, was to not sweat minor scratches in the build of a new bike. "Minor" might be less than "noticEable," so it's a judgment call. If it's small enough, forget it.

  14. #14
    tofurkey hunting
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    Quote Originally Posted by PdxMark
    I can't find it online, but one of the Rivendell Reader tips for better living, among 50-100 in an article, was to not sweat minor scratches in the build of a new bike. "Minor" might be less than "noticEable," so it's a judgment call. If it's small enough, forget it.
    yeah, my note to the op was basically a reflection of reading that in my print version of the same rant. makes sense to me. be careful though, citing grant round these parts can get you into trouble......
    i know i painted you a prettier picture, baby...my fiction beats the hell out of my truth

  15. #15
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    I could go either way on this. On the one hand, a bike is a piece of equipment that is meant to be used (not abused). During normal use of a bike, it is likely that chips and scratches will happen. When I bought my bike a few months ago it came out of the box from the factory with a small chip already taken out of the paint on the downtube. I was bummed about it but, as one of my friends told me, it got the first scratch depression out of the way early. Now, a couple thousand miles and one crash later, I don't even worry about it that much. That's not to say I don't take care of my equipment...my bike receives alot of attention and care, but I try not to sweat things that are basically inevitable in the world of bike racing. On the other hand, if I were shelling out top dollar for a shop with a "professional" staff assembling my bike, I would expect it to be perfect when it got to my hands.

    The OP should decide what is important to him and what he is going to use the bike for. If you'll spend more time looking at it than riding it, make sure they get you a perfect frame. If it's going to be raced, it's going to get scratched or worse, and it's best to not sweat it. Definitely mention it to the store owner/manager and see if you can get a few bucks knocked off or some accessories thrown in.

    Just my $.02

  16. #16
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    When bikes come in from the manufacturer there are times when they come out of the shipping box with defects ussually paint rubs or chips it has nothing to do with the lbs. Depending on what you want you could either ask for a completely different bike or some reduction in price. The lbs will then bring it to the rep for the manufacturer of that particular bike. If i were you i would bring it up when it is still at the shop though to show it is no fault of your own. The lbs will most likely comply within reason.

  17. #17
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    A good note from the OP: The frame was tagged by the owner after I voiced my concern about the end- product. I agreed with him that it would not have been such a big deal had they been only minor scratches on one of the tubes rather than gouges in the carbon seat stays. The new bike will be built next week, and the fitting will follow. Thanks for all the well-thought responses.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by shoerhino View Post
    I would ask them about it to see what they say. I think you have to decide ahead of time if you would like to have a discount for the scratches or want a different bike. Is this a bike that you ordered from the manufactuer and the LBS is assembling? Personally, I'm with you. A new bike should be in a new condition. Small mistakes happen but noticable mistakes should be corrected to your satisfaction.

    When I had my new bike built, I menetioned to the manager of the shop that I saw a bike just like the one I was ordering with a large scuff and the top tube and how disappointed I would be if mine had a ding like that. I mentioned it to emphasize build quality and in the end, they did a great job.
    Mistaken post. Removed.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by shoerhino View Post
    I would ask them about it to see what they say. I think you have to decide ahead of time if you would like to have a discount for the scratches or want a different bike. Is this a bike that you ordered from the manufactuer and the LBS is assembling? Personally, I'm with you. A new bike should be in a new condition. Small mistakes happen but noticable mistakes should be corrected to your satisfaction.

    When I had my new bike built, I menetioned to the manager of the shop that I saw a bike just like the one I was ordering with a large scuff and the top tube and how disappointed I would be if mine had a ding like that. I mentioned it to emphasize build quality and in the end, they did a great job.
    Mistaken post. Deleted.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by AW84 View Post
    Mistaken post. Removed.
    And here I was going to congratulate you on reviving an 11 year old post. That might well have been a new record for this forum.

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