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  1. #1
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    Question Sleeveless jersey tan lines

    When I got out of the shower yesterday and looked in the mirror (to"observe the curve" of my butt, of course) it suddenly struck me that the sleeveless jersey tan on the back of my shoulders (where the sun really hits you) is still there. The tan on my arms and legs is long gone. I never got a serious burn there last summer, and I almost always put on SPF 30 before every ride. Should I be worried, cancer-wise?

    PS- Just kidding about observing the curve. Ha ha.

  2. #2
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    Surprised you're not dead already :)

    Well, my tan lines (legs and arms) never go away through the winter, and haven't for over 30 years. I guess you COULD be worried about skin cancer, but whether you SHOULD be worried is a separate issue. The generally accepted wisdom is that skin cancer is mostly a worry from blistering sunburns during adolescence. Of course, that doesn't prevent the morning talk show gurus from recommending that you get your vitamin D from pills rather than risk 15 minutes of sun per day, but there it is.

  3. #3
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    That's where I stop shaving...

    seriously, any solar exposure (any) increases your chance of skin cancer. How much it matters depends on many factors- a good blistering really rings the bell- and it depends on your family history (genetics) and skin type.

    Taking after the Irish side of the family, I keep well covered and use nother less than lots of SPF 30-- esp. since my father has had several "non-risky" skin tumors removed... but each time the biopsies come back, big sighs of relief go all around.

    Back to shaving- I have furry legs, and getting sunscreen under the fur is a major soaking. So shaved legs, for me. Shaving my back? Easier to wear a long jersey- cooling comes from hydration

    'meat

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Sugar
    When I got out of the shower yesterday and looked in the mirror (to"observe the curve" of my butt, of course) it suddenly struck me that the sleeveless jersey tan on the back of my shoulders (where the sun really hits you) is still there. The tan on my arms and legs is long gone. I never got a serious burn there last summer, and I almost always put on SPF 30 before every ride. Should I be worried, cancer-wise?

    PS- Just kidding about observing the curve. Ha ha.
    the worst burn is in the retina of all the people who had to see you in your sleeveless glory.
    but that's not what you asked about.

    Think about how it works -- your legs are underneath you, moving and shaded. Your back never changes it's orientation to the sun (or, very little change). you're going to get hammered back there by the exposure.
    I would go as near as possible to total sunblock. I slather on 50 (when I remember, which isn't always). And wear some sleeves for heavens sake.

  5. #5
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    Congratulations on the witty retort, and thank you.

  6. #6
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    Sunscreen and skin cancer

    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Sugar
    When I got out of the shower yesterday and looked in the mirror (to"observe the curve" of my butt, of course) it suddenly struck me that the sleeveless jersey tan on the back of my shoulders (where the sun really hits you) is still there. The tan on my arms and legs is long gone. I never got a serious burn there last summer, and I almost always put on SPF 30 before every ride. Should I be worried, cancer-wise?
    Interestingly, while sunscreen has been shown to prevent or reduce sun burns, there is surprisingly little evidence that it can reduce the chances of several forms of the most dangerous forms of skin cancer (malignent melanoma, basal cell carcinoma).

    Sunscreen and Carcinoma and melanoma

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