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  1. #1
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    Softride Classic tt...what can you tell me?

    I'm thinking about buying a Softride Classic tt 650c frame. I'm wondering if there are any issues with these frames that I should be aware of since they are a bit unique. Also, my typical frame size is between 55 and 56cm. This happens to be where the cut off for the medium and large size is. Should I choose the medium (53-55cm) or large (56-58)? I don't know if these bikes run big or small etc. Also, do you know if they have internal cable routing, weight, 1" or 1 1/8" head tube, have any experience riding them? Any information would be really helpful, thank you.

  2. #2
    Bickety bam!
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    If there is one piece of advice...

    Quote Originally Posted by psuambassador
    I'm thinking about buying a Softride Classic tt 650c frame. I'm wondering if there are any issues with these frames that I should be aware of since they are a bit unique. Also, my typical frame size is between 55 and 56cm. This happens to be where the cut off for the medium and large size is. Should I choose the medium (53-55cm) or large (56-58)? I don't know if these bikes run big or small etc. Also, do you know if they have internal cable routing, weight, 1" or 1 1/8" head tube, have any experience riding them? Any information would be really helpful, thank you.
    If there is one piece of advice that I could give you about Softride bikes, is to not get one.

    Bear in mind, these bikes are energy robbing pieces of junk. They're not well built, and never have been (in my opinion, just from the ones that I've seen close up and all). They're heavy, and clunky. One plus, they are aerodynamic, but still not "that" aero. Also bear in mind that if you plan on riding said bike in any USCF sanctioned TT, you will not be allowed to in a year or so when the USCF starts adhering to the UCI rules for TT bikes, and the Softride is not allowed.

  3. #3
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    I guess I should mention that I am a triathlete and I'm looking for something comfortable and capable of taking me through an Ironman. Any other opinions? Also, where do you find bags and rear bottle cage mounts to fit this piece of art?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by psuambassador
    I guess I should mention that I am a triathlete and I'm looking for something comfortable and capable of taking me through an Ironman. Any other opinions? Also, where do you find bags and rear bottle cage mounts to fit this piece of art?

    I had one before, but it was a classic beam (the flexible kind). In my experience, you should really check if you have any stand over height issue. For me, I have zero stand over clearance. That is why I traded it.

    But if comfort is on your list number one, then you might find it is a good choice.

    Chris

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by magnolialover
    If there is one piece of advice that I could give you about Softride bikes, is to not get one.

    Bear in mind, these bikes are energy robbing pieces of junk. They're not well built, and never have been (in my opinion, just from the ones that I've seen close up and all). They're heavy, and clunky. One plus, they are aerodynamic, but still not "that" aero. Also bear in mind that if you plan on riding said bike in any USCF sanctioned TT, you will not be allowed to in a year or so when the USCF starts adhering to the UCI rules for TT bikes, and the Softride is not allowed.
    i wouldnt consider them junk. I would advise to riding them first before bashing them first though.

    Why do i say this? simple. i own the roadwing which is the predecessor of the softride qualifier. The frame is somehwat chunky yes. People say they're energy robbing just because bouncing on the saddle theoretically reduces the amount of power output of your foot. That being said, magnolia did bring up that its an aerodynamic bike.

    Anyway here's my opinion. You use the softride on flats and steady hills. You dont use the bike on big climbs because the bouncing does rob you of power. Then again, if you end up standing the whole time without sitting down on the saddle, climbing would be fine then. Also weight is another concern. The ehavier you are, the worse your bounce will be. Im only 135 so bouncing is not an issue. Also, the bike will teach you proper pedalling because if you are bouncing on flats, it means your pedalling technique is basically wrong.

    And oh yeah, magnolia again brings up that these bikes are illegal in UCSF and UCI races. Sadly that is true. But softrides are fun. I'll use mine whenever i can. But in UCI or Ucsf, its my cannondale.

  6. #6
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    Several good points given, I'll throw in a few more.

    Quote Originally Posted by psuambassador
    I'm thinking about buying a Softride Classic tt 650c frame. I'm wondering if there are any issues with these frames that I should be aware of since they are a bit unique. Also, my typical frame size is between 55 and 56cm. This happens to be where the cut off for the medium and large size is. Should I choose the medium (53-55cm) or large (56-58)? I don't know if these bikes run big or small etc. Also, do you know if they have internal cable routing, weight, 1" or 1 1/8" head tube, Also, do you know if they have internal cable routing, weight, 1" or 1 1/8" head tube, thank you.

    I have ridden many of the Softride's including the Classic tt. Let me see if I can answer your questions.

    __Q: I'm wondering if there are any issues with these frames that I should be aware of since they are a bit unique.

    A: As stated, you will immediately notice two things:
    1. They are awkward when trying to mount. The top tube (beam) is higher than most bikes. This is also an issue when riding in the city with lots of traffic lights or anytime you need to stand over the bike. Is this an issue when riding? No, not a problem.

    2. Bounce. If you have not ridden these bikes before, you will bounce. If you are purchasing a new bike, ask for the stiffest beam possible. Even the stiff beam will bounce, but after 10 minutes of riding, your stroke will smooth out and you will not bounce anymore.


    __Q: Also, my typical frame size is between 55 and 56cm. This happens to be where the cut off for the medium and large size is. Should I choose the medium (53-55cm) or large (56-58)? I don't know if these bikes run big or small etc.

    __A: You sound like me in bike measurements. You need to get the medium frame, but again, get the stiff beam made for heavy riders. It will last longer, not bounce quite so much and will not develop the Softride squeak.


    __Q: Also, do you know if they have internal cable routing, weight, 1" or 1 1/8" head tube.

    __A: Mine was a 1", but if it is a more recent model, I'd bet it is a 1 1/8. Easy answer, if it has a quil stem, 1", if it is the current type of stem, I'd bet 1 1/8. It had external routing, but that was a number of years ago.


    Overall: These are great all out TT bikes or great long distance bikes. I did not like commuting on mine due to too many traffic lights and the stand over issue. Once on the road, I love them. It is really an erie feeling too to look down and see nothing below you.

    When descending steep hills, you will feel a little pushed up and forward. Takes more time to get used to than the bouncing.

    The huge plus, more than aerodynamics, after a long ride on the worse road conditions, your legs and back section feels great! My arms and hands feel more tired than the rest of the body. I attribute that to the legs and back getting so much benefit from the beam that now I focus more on the fatigue in my hands and arms.

    Are they faster? Jurgen Zach says yes. Are they heavier? My lightest was 20lbs, so in today's standards, yes. But for TT and long distance riding, not a big issue unless you have lots of mountains.

    Overall, quality product and innovation is often not understood or appreciated.

    After saying all this, I prefer the ride of the expired Trek Y-Foil.
    Not in the mood?! Mood's a thing for cattle and love play... not fighting.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by omniviper
    And oh yeah, magnolia again brings up that these bikes are illegal in UCSF and UCI races. Sadly that is true. But softrides are fun. I'll use mine whenever i can. But in UCI or Ucsf, its my cannondale.
    Sadly this is NOT true and magnolialover never said it was. Softrides are perfectly legal in all USCF races (road and TT) except for international qualifying events. This will remain so at least through next season. Magnolialover got it right, omniviper mischaracterized the original comment.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by asgelle
    Sadly this is NOT true and magnolialover never said it was. Softrides are perfectly legal in all USCF races (road and TT) except for international qualifying events. This will remain so at least through next season. Magnolialover got it right, omniviper mischaracterized the original comment.
    i was referring to the 2005 rulebook of the USCF. At least I had thought that the rule has been enforced already so i made the past comment. But if i was wrong, point taken and touche.

    (b) There may be no protective shield, fairing, or other device on any part of the bicycle, which has the effect of reducing air resistance except that spoke covers may be used
    (c) Wheels may be made with spokes or solid construction. No wheel may contain special mechanisms to store and release energy
    (d) The handlebar ends shall be solidly plugged and attachments thereto shall be fashioned in such a way as to minimize danger without impairing steering. Handlebars used for steering with ends, features, or attachments that extend forward or upward or that provide support for other than the the rider's hands are permitted only in time trial and pursuit events (not in Team Sprint); however, attachments that point upward on the brakehoods of road bicycles are allowed if the distance between them is greater than 25 cm (9.8 inches). [disqualification]
    (e) Bicycles must meet current UCI technical regulations at events that select 17-18, U23 and elite riders for international competition or national teams.

  9. #9
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    Thank you

    Thank you for all of your comments everyone. I will probably pull the trigger today. The bike store informed me that it does have internal cable routing, a 1" headset, and they are double checking my measurements to make sure I get the correct size. It even comes with an aero fork, which I can't believe for the price.

    I've heard both good and bad from people in their advice and both the pros and cons from everyone appear to be consistent. Cons: weight, bounce, stand over height Pros: Aero, comfortable over distance, good for stroke perfection. I'll add another, looks cool as hell!

    My ultimate plan is to use this bike only for triathlons and ultimately the Florida IM which is the flatest of all IMs. It seems to me that this would be the perfect bike for that. If I enter a very hilly tri, which shouldn't be the case here in the DelMarVa area, I may just opt to use my road bike. I'm looking forward to the beam forcing a perfect stroke and since I'm not a heavy rider (165), my weight should not create any bounce beyond that.

    I'm going to finish this frame off with a Hed disc in the back, Hed tri spoke up front, Dura Ace drivetrain (including DA tri crank), Cane Creek headset, Vision tech aero basebar, Profile T2 aero bars, terry dragonfly saddle, and some very light titanium pedals.

    I'd be glad to hear any more opinions/advice.

  10. #10
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    good luck and enjoy. prepare to receive massive amounts of comments about your bike and welcome to the softride "club" if there is any anyway

  11. #11
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    I like the set up.

    [/QUOTE]
    I'm going to finish this frame off with a Hed disc in the back, Hed tri spoke up front, Dura Ace drivetrain (including DA tri crank), Cane Creek headset, Vision tech aero basebar, Profile T2 aero bars, terry dragonfly saddle, and some very light titanium pedals.

    I'd be glad to hear any more opinions/advice.[/QUOTE]


    The disc especially. However, if you qualify for IM championships, you can't use it in Hawaii.

    I am also a huge fan of the Hed tri spoke. I might opt for a spoked deep dish front over the tri spoke, but just my preference.

    The DA tri crank is sweet. Go with behind the seat water bottles and/or an aerobar bottle.

    Now, post a picture!!! At least a few of us SR fans are waiting.

    Good luck with the race!
    Not in the mood?! Mood's a thing for cattle and love play... not fighting.

  12. #12
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    Thanks for the reply. Yeah, I'm planning on throwing an xlab setup behind the seat. Do you have any experience with the xlab stuff? I will definitely throw up a picture when I finish it. I'm excited to be joining the SR group. It certainly seems that there are a lot of conformists and doubters out there. I am excited to experience the ride and have a uniquely designed and well performing bike.

  13. #13
    TZL
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    random question

    are old-school aero bikes like the Giant MCR and Zipp "Wing" bike still competiton legal in UCSF racing? how about triathlons? i know bikes like these were banned from UCI a bit ago.

  14. #14
    FTF
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    Quote Originally Posted by TZL
    random question

    are old-school aero bikes like the Giant MCR and Zipp "Wing" bike still competiton legal in UCSF racing? how about triathlons? i know bikes like these were banned from UCI a bit ago.
    They are uscf legal for one more season, then they will become uscf illegal as the uscf is adopting all of the uci rules.

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