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  1. #1
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    Why sleep is important to recovery and growth

    Good video explaining the importance of sleep. Even though the channel is about bodybuilding, but sleep applies to everyone.


  2. #2
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    but here's the thing, if you overtrain, it can be difficult to get good deep sleep, which then doesn't allow a good enough recovery for your next hard training session. And the violent cycle repeats itself until you're burned out. I found this out the hard way a few years ago. Never overtrain, it really jacks up your sleep quality.

  3. #3
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    For me, the issue of whether one, (but more specifically me), is getting enough sleep is easily determined. If one on an ordinary basis has to be awakened or prompted by an alarm to wake up and get out of bed they are IMO not getting enough sleep.

    You have gotten the sleep you need when you sleep undisturbed and wake up naturally and internally feeling ready to get up. This may if circumstances permit include after waking up a 15-minute lay in minute prelaunch.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalGuy View Post
    For me, the issue of whether one, (but more specifically me), is getting enough sleep is easily determined. If one on an ordinary basis has to be awakened or prompted by an alarm to wake up and get out of bed they are IMO not getting enough sleep.

    You have gotten the sleep you need when you sleep undisturbed and wake up naturally and internally feeling ready to get up. This may if circumstances permit include after waking up a 15-minute lay in minute prelaunch.
    yeah that sounds like common sense isn't it? But I think living in a modern society were lights and electronic gadgets and computers are every, it can disrupt one's sleep without one even realizing it.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalGuy View Post
    For me, the issue of whether one, (but more specifically me), is getting enough sleep is easily determined. If one on an ordinary basis has to be awakened or prompted by an alarm to wake up and get out of bed they are IMO not getting enough sleep.

    You have gotten the sleep you need when you sleep undisturbed and wake up naturally and internally feeling ready to get up. This may if circumstances permit include after waking up a 15-minute lay in minute prelaunch.
    I have heard this advice for decades and have tried to implement it a few times but itoesn't work for me on at least two levels. First, if I sleep without an alarm I will indeed sleep longer, but then have trouble falling asleep the next night. It gets into a yo-yo effect. I guess I am one of those people who, if left in a cave with no clocks, would standardize on a 25-26 hour day. Second, knowing I have an alarm set lets me go back to sleep for a fairly short time without worring about oversleeping. My day is regulated enough that I really do need to get up at a specific time.

  6. #6
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    I have read somewhere that says that for each hour you sleep before 9 PM, it's worth 1.5-2 hours after 10 PM. In other words, the time you go to sleep is just as important as the number of sleep hours. The other thing is that the first half of your sleep is much more important than the later half. This is because quality deep sleep happens in the first half, this is when testosterone, growth hormone, and probably a whole battery of neurological repairs going on in the brain, tend to happen most.

    Back in the cave days, people probably go to sleep soon after sunset, and this is probably the rhythm that our physiology has evolved to.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    I have read somewhere that says that for each hour you sleep before 9 PM, it's worth 1.5-2 hours after 10 PM. In other words, the time you go to sleep is just as important as the number of sleep hours. The other thing is that the first half of your sleep is much more important than the later half. This is because quality deep sleep happens in the first half, this is when testosterone, growth hormone, and probably a whole battery of neurological repairs going on in the brain, tend to happen most.

    Back in the cave days, people probably go to sleep soon after sunset, and this is probably the rhythm that our physiology has evolved to.
    I recently started using a Garmin watch while sleeping and was quite surprised by the crappy sleep quality and to a lesser extent duration I was getting. I have no idea how accurate it is but I've been able make some adjustments to improve both deep and total sleep time fairly easily.
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  8. #8
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    Ah, slumber!!! Ever since I was a kid I've been hassled over the amount of time I prefer to be at rest. Vindication! Thank you modern science.
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    I recently started using a Garmin watch while sleeping and was quite surprised by the crappy sleep quality and to a lesser extent duration I was getting. I have no idea how accurate it is but I've been able make some adjustments to improve both deep and total sleep time fairly easily.
    just curious, what does the Garmin watch measure that allows it to tell the quality of your sleep?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    just curious, what does the Garmin watch measure that allows it to tell the quality of your sleep?
    HR, HR Variability and movement are the inputs to their algorithm.

    https://www.garmin.com/en-US/blog/fitness/advancedrem/

    I'm sure it's not perfect but probably more useful looking at relative over time. It reports Awake, REM, light and Deep sleep graphically on GC. You can also see movement during sleep on GC.

    On occasion I find I need to adjust the start and end of my night's sleep, but it's normally pretty much spot on from what I can see. I've gone from about 6.5 hours / night during the week to 7.5 hours, and deep sleep from about 1.5 hours to just shy of 2 hours / night.
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