Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: 1st wool jersey

  1. #1
    BIGchainRING
    Reputation: centurionomega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    294

    1st wool jersey

    A buddy gave me an old wool cycling jersey as a gift.

    A few questions:

    Is there any special caution I should take when laundering. I've had wool garments before and either got them dry cleaned (a suit) or washed them in the washer. After the wash, they came out all wrinkly and shrunken. Is hand washing required?

    I guess this is an old jersey, so any potential shrinking would have already occurred.

    Also, does one become used to the "hair shirt" feel of a wool jersey? Compared to lyrca/spandex, this one feels kinda pokey.

    I found what the name on the jersey is. It is an Italian titanium frame maker. Trecią Cicli Titanio. Pretty cool. I have the jersey, now I just need to get a frame to be complete.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 1st wool jersey-pic_0416-2-.jpg  

  2. #2
    We have met the enemy...
    Reputation: paredown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    6,639
    We used to wash them in Woolite and then block them on one of those net thingies and let them air dry.

    You can always wear a summer weight wicking tee underneath--as they wear the scratchiness definitely diminishes... Nothing better for damp/rainy riding IMO.
    "When the spirits are low, when the day appears dark, when work becomes monotonous, when hope hardly seems worth having, just mount a bicycle and go out for a spin down the road, without thought on anything but the ride you are taking."

    (Sir) Arthur Conan Doyle. Scientific American, January 18, 1896

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    2,166
    wool is awesome for 45-65 degree rides.
    I''ve always hand washed mine and hang dried them only. Just because it's wool doesn't mean it won't shrink. If you put that in the dryer, and forget to to the heat off, it will turn into a miniature jersey your daughter can put on a barby doll as a "babytee"
    lastly, as you perspire, the fabric softens up and you lose the pokey feel. wool jersey's are awesome and I'd like to see more brands do what rapha is doing, albeit at a more attainable price point.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: High Gear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    2,241
    The Merino wool jerseys are much more comfortable than the old itchy ones. I have a woolistic Wolf jersey from Vintage Velos that is very comfortable.

    Wool Jerseys - Vintage Velos
    Can't chrome carbon.
    Yes, you can call me a slightly opinionated retrogrouch.

    "Keep your eyes on the road and your hands upon the bars"

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: kjdhawkhill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    288
    Quote Originally Posted by centurionomega View Post
    I guess this is an old jersey, so any potential shrinking would have already occurred. [might]
    :
    No guarantees that someone took poor care of it in the past.

    Wear it on a half dozen chilly to low 70s rides aNd you'll break it in (I would bet).

    I only have new/modern merino wool but I love it for cruising with a trailer at any temp, and as a layer when things are chilly.

    Cool gift.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: froze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    5,883
    I like wool too, I use them mostly for touring because they don't stink after one ride like 100% polyester.

    They are a bit of a pain to wash which is why I don't wear them all the time and only for touring because the work involved to wash them.

    All I do is fill the kitchen sink with warm water, not hot. Next use Blue Dawn or some sort of mild soap but not laundry detergent as bazaar as that sounds. If you have any stains pour a bit of the soap directly on the stain and rub it in.
    Then let it soak for at least an hour.
    Then gently agitate it like a washing machine would but gentler for about 5 minutes.
    Remove the jersey, drain the basin, refill with clean warm water and agitate gently again for about 5 minutes.
    If the water shows signs of soap repeat the rinse thing with fresh water of course till the soap is gone.
    Then remove the jersey and place it flat on a clean towel, put another towel over it and then press the to squeeze the excess water out and let the towels soak in that water. But do not wring out a wool jersey.
    Then hang the jersey to let it dry completely.
    It may feel tight when you wear it after you washed it but it will stretch back out.

    The above is how I do it, which I learned from someone else, I'm sure there are other ways that will work just as well.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xk98yvozq1g
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvk63...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=p92Stnnigjs
    "They don't do things that way anymore. This is the Age of Science Know-How, electronal marvels."

  7. #7
    xxl
    xxl is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    16,311
    One needn't use soap on every wash of wool clothing, either; a few minutes' soak in a bucket of tepid water will be fine for all but the filthiest piece. Then do the roll-in-a-towel thing, as froze suggests, and let dry (flat drying on a rack is best).

    Also, turning the garment inside-out is recommended.

    Wool is a durable fabric when dry, but not so much when wet, which is why it's recommended to be gentle, not wring it, etc.

    I learned this from the fellow who owns (or owned?) Vintage Velos--awesome stuff, btw.

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: froze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    5,883
    Quote Originally Posted by xxl View Post
    One needn't use soap on every wash of wool clothing, either; a few minutes' soak in a bucket of tepid water will be fine for all but the filthiest piece. Then do the roll-in-a-towel thing, as froze suggests, and let dry (flat drying on a rack is best).

    Also, turning the garment inside-out is recommended.

    Wool is a durable fabric when dry, but not so much when wet, which is why it's recommended to be gentle, not wring it, etc.

    I learned this from the fellow who owns (or owned?) Vintage Velos--awesome stuff, btw.

    One of my wool jerseys came with the instructions I listed and that's how I clean mine. I would think (?) that all wool manufactures would say something similar. I don't wash them after every ride because I don't use them for daily rides I only use them when I do my short tours, so by the time I get home their in need of cleaning after wearing them for 2 days straight. The beauty of wool though that even after two days of straight wearing they still don't stink anywhere near as bad as 100% Polyester does after just one ride.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xk98yvozq1g
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvk63...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=p92Stnnigjs
    "They don't do things that way anymore. This is the Age of Science Know-How, electronal marvels."

  9. #9
    wyrd biš ful ćręd
    Reputation: c_h_i_n_a_m_a_n's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    1,117
    I wear mine for quite a few rides before a wash ... they do not smell at all. Just the knowledge of them not being washed for sometime makes me do so. I put them in a washing machine net and use the wool cycle in cold water, which is gentle enough. Still keeping the shape and size.

  10. #10
    xxl
    xxl is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    16,311
    Quote Originally Posted by froze View Post
    One of my wool jerseys came with the instructions I listed and that's how I clean mine. I would think (?) that all wool manufactures would say something similar. I don't wash them after every ride because I don't use them for daily rides I only use them when I do my short tours, so by the time I get home their in need of cleaning after wearing them for 2 days straight. The beauty of wool though that even after two days of straight wearing they still don't stink anywhere near as bad as 100% Polyester does after just one ride.
    Bingo. When I wash mine, I pretty much follow the instructions you laid out as well.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    91
    Wool does not smell when your wear/sweat in it as Plyester does, but wool does smell awful when you wash it.....
    Even brand new wool garments smell bad during a wash. Never really figured out why, but it must have something to do with the natural lanolin in them or maybe the dyes they use......

  12. #12
    BIGchainRING
    Reputation: centurionomega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    294
    So I have some tales about my 1st wool jersey.

    First off, thanks for all the info. It sounds like wear it and enjoy it is the best advice.

    I finally got around to wearing it out on a ride. It was about a 60˚ drizzly day in San Francisco. I went on a shortish ride to go swimming with my wifee and then afterwards ride along Ocean Beach. It was a little bit chilly at first but after the first hill I was warmed up and primed. As advised, the weather at the time was a perfect match for a wool jersey.

    The hair shirt feeling went away pretty quick. I guess one's skin gets used to it and just shuts off the sensory input?

    I stopped in for some groceries before heading home and noticed the jersey is plenty warm enough. I was dripping sweat from my brow in the milk aisle.

    So I didn't do anything too special to wash. I used a mesh garment bag and washed it on delicate in a top-load washer. I did pin it flat on a clothesline to dry in bright sunlight. No shrinkage or busted seams etc.

    A couple more cool things about the jersey. It is a Santini. Do they make good stuff?☺ Also, for some reason each of the 3 back pockets had buttons at one point. All of them either popped off or were removed. Who would want buttons on their pockets? I usually try to stay upright when riding a bike.

    So, thanks again for the tips. Retro-Classic is the classiest board on RBR.

  13. #13
    xxl
    xxl is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    16,311
    Quote Originally Posted by centurionomega View Post
    So I have some tales about my 1st wool jersey.

    First off, thanks for all the info. It sounds like wear it and enjoy it is the best advice.

    I finally got around to wearing it out on a ride. It was about a 60˚ drizzly day in San Francisco. I went on a shortish ride to go swimming with my wifee and then afterwards ride along Ocean Beach. It was a little bit chilly at first but after the first hill I was warmed up and primed. As advised, the weather at the time was a perfect match for a wool jersey.

    The hair shirt feeling went away pretty quick. I guess one's skin gets used to it and just shuts off the sensory input?

    I stopped in for some groceries before heading home and noticed the jersey is plenty warm enough. I was dripping sweat from my brow in the milk aisle.

    So I didn't do anything too special to wash. I used a mesh garment bag and washed it on delicate in a top-load washer. I did pin it flat on a clothesline to dry in bright sunlight. No shrinkage or busted seams etc.

    A couple more cool things about the jersey. It is a Santini. Do they make good stuff?☺ Also, for some reason each of the 3 back pockets had buttons at one point. All of them either popped off or were removed. Who would want buttons on their pockets? I usually try to stay upright when riding a bike.

    So, thanks again for the tips. Retro-Classic is the classiest board on RBR.

    Yes, Santini makes nice stuff. The buttons are old school Euro-style, common to a certain period. I suspect their use was because older wool fabrics may have become stretched out more easily, and button holes were the fix--just a guess. I've seen buttons on old jersey front (yes) pockets, but those are a bit more obvious as to their purpose.

    I don't know if I'd hang the jersey (the weight of the water may cause it to stretch a bit), nor would I be inclined to hang it in bright sunlight, if by that you mean direct sunlight, as this may cause fading, and "wrinkly" drying.

    From your photo, that's a very cool jersey, and if you're in the Bay area, a very functional one as well. I heartily recommend you get some wool sleeves, and a wool undershirt, thereby extending your ability to use the jersey in more weather conditions. Vintage Velos' stuff is very nice, as are the products from Kucharik.

Similar Threads

  1. Malawi wool jersey??
    By spade2you in forum Bianchi
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-28-2011, 11:52 AM
  2. Full zip wool jersey? anybody know of ..
    By Gnarly 928 in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 11-03-2008, 10:49 AM
  3. My new wool jersey.
    By macalu in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 04-08-2008, 08:29 PM
  4. Wool Jersey
    By links0311 in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 05-16-2007, 04:03 PM
  5. Wool jersey Review
    By ARP in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-18-2006, 05:01 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Sea Otter Classic

Hot Deals

Contest


Latest RoadBike Articles


Latest Videos

RoadbikeReview on Facebook