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  1. #1
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    Lemond Coors Classic Silver Bullet Campagnolo Delta

    Hi, Im looking into getting this bike, but havent been able to find much information online about its history.

    Does anyone know if some profesional raced this bike? Was this a high end bike back in its day? Could I ride this bike 100miles?

    I love the looks and the Delta components, but Im milennial looking to get a retro bike, so I really dont know what bikes were trendy back in the day.

    Thanks for the info!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Lemond Coors Classic Silver Bullet Campagnolo Delta-s-l1600.jpg  

  2. #2
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    What a beauty. You can go 100 miles on this bike. You'll find that retro steel really rides like a Cadillac. Get it!
    Waxahachie, Texas
    Biciclette Gios

    "Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown."

  3. #3
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    On the offchance that you're not just taking the pi$$, I will attempt to answer your questions:

    probably not
    yes
    yes

    and some bonus comments

    It appears to be an earlier generation 7-speed C Record bike, which would date it to around late '80's - 1990.

    Pretty, but basically a wall hanger. Not that it couldn't be ridden if it fits and you really like it.
    Last edited by bikerjulio; 08-31-2017 at 01:24 PM.
    We just don’t realize the most significant moments of our lives when they’re happening
    Back then I thought “well there'll be other days”
    I didn’t realize that was the only day
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9yrupye7B0

    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?
    One.
    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

  4. #4
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    Thanks guys, anybody know if this bike had a big production? Or where only a few made?

    I read campagolo delta wasn't very reliable to use, if a intend to ride this bike once a week will I probably mess up the brakes?

    Any idea if Lemond sold the bike with the campagnolo drivetrain? Or was this drivetrain added to the frame?

    And lastly how much would you pay for this bike? It's hard to find a Campagnolo delta brake and Cgroup on a vintage bike for less than $1.5 on the internet...

    Thanks!

  5. #5
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    Delta brakes were not so good at actually braking in their earlier generations of which there were 4 in total. Late generation work fine. Don't know without better photos what that bike has. If original they would need new pads which probably means new holders too if you need to slow down. Quite honestly messing with Deltas is not something I would reccomend to someone who is not a decent mechanic.

    It would have been a top of the line bike with that group. The condition of the components is key in assessing value. Minty would be well over $1500. Well used would be well under.

    I'd need to see a good quality set of close-ups of the components to say too much more.
    We just don’t realize the most significant moments of our lives when they’re happening
    Back then I thought “well there'll be other days”
    I didn’t realize that was the only day
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9yrupye7B0

    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?
    One.
    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

  6. #6
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    very cool bike if you can remove the coors light branding.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  7. #7
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    You do NOT want to use this as a daily commuter. This is a classic bike, and it's value will only increase over time. It is a COLLECTIBLE. Don't ruin it by riding it every day.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  8. #8
    hfc
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    I think you would be pleased with that bike. The sticker looks like Columbus SLX. Groupset looks like 2nd generation C Record. I seem to remember that Lemond model was built by Bilatto brothers - quality frame builders. Delta brakes work fine if set up right, although I wouldn't necessarily want to race or do competitive group rides on them.

    Here's my '86 De Rosa, Columbus SLX, with mixed generation C Record group. I rode it on a quick ride after work today. Super bike - one of my favorites!

    OK one pic is of another bike and it won't let me remove it.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Lemond Coors Classic Silver Bullet Campagnolo Delta-img_7265.jpg   Lemond Coors Classic Silver Bullet Campagnolo Delta-img_7235.jpg  

  9. #9
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    How can you distinguish between the four different generation deltas? That's a sweet De rosa bike by the way...

  10. #10
    hfc
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    Thanks! I have a collection of pretty nice 80's and 90's race bikes, but the De Rosa stands out.

    There's a link somewhere out there with the details on the Deltas. The first couple of generations had 3 pivots (you have to take the cover off) and the last couple of gens have 5 pivots. Early generations had white rubber bits, while later had black.

    Here is the innards of my brakes
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Lemond Coors Classic Silver Bullet Campagnolo Delta-img_6764.jpg  

  11. #11
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    here is a good summary with pictures of all 5 generations of Delta brakes. I misspoke earlier, though I believe Gen 1 were prototypes only. campagnolo delta brakes: Campagnolo C Record delta brake calipers

    they fall into 2 basic designs - 3 pivot and 5 pivot.

    Lemond Coors Classic Silver Bullet Campagnolo Delta-03.jpg

    Lemond Coors Classic Silver Bullet Campagnolo Delta-05.jpg

    Gens 1, 2 and 3 were 3 pivot.

    4th and 5th (like hfc's and mine) are 5 pivot.

    the 3-pivot had limited stopping power (being kind) being good for a mild retardation of speed. I had a set of 3-pivot Croce D'Aune Deltas so know of what I speak. I suggest these are good for desk display as conversation pieces.

    they were completely redesigned as 5-pivot. These actually work very well, powerful with little pressure needed, but the reputational damage lived on. Decent quality used examples on eBay are going for $650.

    Campy seemed to have a habit of starting off things with a crappy design, like the original Syncro shifter, then fixing it later.
    Last edited by bikerjulio; 09-01-2017 at 03:10 AM.
    We just don’t realize the most significant moments of our lives when they’re happening
    Back then I thought “well there'll be other days”
    I didn’t realize that was the only day
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9yrupye7B0

    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?
    One.
    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

  12. #12
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    OP, I looked over the picture again.

    Everything I see points to early generation C Record.

    First gen rear derailleur, early version Syncro shifter, and probably 3-pivot Deltas.

    I you were an enthusiast wanting something for the odd show and tell ride I'd say go into it knowing what you're getting. If you wanted a vintage bike for more regular riding, I'd suggest getting something with the later versions of the C Record group.

    And if you have hills to tackle you'd better be in good shape. Typically the chainrings of the era were 52/42 and the biggest sprocket available at the rear was 25T maybe 26T.

    From a financial perspective if that frame and components are as mint as they look there then the price will reflect that mintyness. But the minute you ride it the mintyness goes away and you just have a used bike of far lower value. Better to buy a bike and components in good used condition if you intend to ride it regularly.
    Last edited by bikerjulio; 09-01-2017 at 03:37 PM.
    We just don’t realize the most significant moments of our lives when they’re happening
    Back then I thought “well there'll be other days”
    I didn’t realize that was the only day
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9yrupye7B0

    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?
    One.
    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

  13. #13
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    I''m riding the 2nd generation deltas right now and they're fine. One finger in the drops two from the hoods. The C Record stuff is fine also in some ways great. I forgot how easy shifting the old front der was. I can't speak to that particular model but older steel bikes are a joy to ride. Theres no reason to just hang that on the wall unless you want to.
    Again forget about linked articles blah, blah, blah. I'm riding the deltas now and they are fine. I go from 40 to a stop in a very comfortable margin.

  14. #14
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    Agree with Mackgoo, Delta brakes while arguably one of the most iconic and beautiful vintage components ever made but they get a bad rap. They are a bit more complex to set up initially and often done incorrectly by those who claim they don't work. Due to their design, they require more clearance between brake pad and rim to gain the mechanical advantage. If they are set up like a caliper they won't have much power. I have 5th generation 5 pivot versions and they work great.

  15. #15
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    But seriously, if I had that bike, I'd cherish it, take it out only rarely on nice days, obsessively tinker with it, and show it to my friends to impress them. Using a bike like this in any other way would be a crime, at least in my opinion. But then, I'm partial to such retro bikes, even though I know d@mn well that I don't need another bike like this.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  16. #16
    hfc
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    But seriously, if I had that bike, I'd cherish it, take it out only rarely on nice days, obsessively tinker with it, and show it to my friends to impress them. Using a bike like this in any other way would be a crime, at least in my opinion. But then, I'm partial to such retro bikes, even though I know d@mn well that I don't need another bike like this.
    Ha I agree it should be cherished and ridden in nice weather only, but a bike like that should be ridden a lot. A bike like that would probably sell for about $1200-1500 and it would ride way better than the same money spent on any new bike. I'll also disagree with the previous post as the RD looks to be second gen. First gen has engraved shield logo and no cage cutouts. 1st gen cranks also had engraved logo inside the chain rings.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Lemond Coors Classic Silver Bullet Campagnolo Delta-img_7210.jpg  

  17. #17
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    Yes, I meant to say early generation rather than 1st. As with may of their parts there was a new iteration almost every other year. A while ago we had a thread about the history of Syncro shifters of which there were a few, but at some point both shifters and RD geometry went through a redesign, so there are "early" and "late" C Record shifting systems.
    We just don’t realize the most significant moments of our lives when they’re happening
    Back then I thought “well there'll be other days”
    I didn’t realize that was the only day
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9yrupye7B0

    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?
    One.
    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

  18. #18
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    Nobody has mentioned the sweet Cinellis. Nice Regal saddle too.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    Nobody has mentioned the sweet Cinellis. Nice Regal saddle too.
    Word. Steel bike with American geometry, Campagnolo, Cinelli and a Regal! This bike should be ridden not showcased. I tried showcasing my vintage Colnago with a mish-mash of Campy C-Record but the bike rode so well that it quickly became my commuter, rain, race, and training bike. Ride it like it's yours.
    You'd think we were here for something other than fun. - Ishmael

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by aellaguno View Post
    How can you distinguish between the four different generation deltas? That's a sweet De rosa bike by the way...
    So did you buy it?
    Lemond had several companies build bikes over the years. Billato, in Italy, made many steel frames for Lemond. Several american companies also produced frames. Then the brand was purchased by Trek. The story gets nasty after that.

    Pre-Trek Lemonds were well regarded. Longer top tubes than other brands, and relaxed seat tube angle.

    Don't worry about the rep on Deltas, they stop adequately if well maintained. But this frame is indeed unique, with collectable components. I would not make it a daily rider or commuter, but YES for riding it regularly.Lemond Coors Classic Silver Bullet Campagnolo Delta-deltas.jpg

  21. #21
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    Thanks for sharing everyone, I did up getting the bike, its actually in great condition. I dont think it was ever ridden. Ill be using it every once in a while on spacial occasions, but I plan to make a nice wall mount with some vintage coors classic posters. The frame has great detail. Im posting some pictures.

    Columbus TSX frame which I think is somewhat rare.
    9.8 kilos without pedals which I think is also really right for an '89 bike.

    Should I go for cage pedals? Or try to find Look red/white cleats?

    Lemond Coors Classic Silver Bullet Campagnolo Delta-img_4252.jpg
    Lemond Coors Classic Silver Bullet Campagnolo Delta-img_4251.jpgLemond Coors Classic Silver Bullet Campagnolo Delta-img_4250.jpgLemond Coors Classic Silver Bullet Campagnolo Delta-img_4249.jpg

  22. #22
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    pedals are personal. but i would get some campy cage pedals from the era, like chorus or victory, which i have on my '84 davidson. check velobase.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  23. #23
    hfc
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    Nice! Make sure to post a ride report. For a 1990-ish bike, cage or clipless would be appropriate.

  24. #24
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    You're right about the condition. Based on those photos it looks like it was ridden a couple of times and put away.
    We just don’t realize the most significant moments of our lives when they’re happening
    Back then I thought “well there'll be other days”
    I didn’t realize that was the only day
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9yrupye7B0

    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?
    One.
    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

  25. #25
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    Very nice. My Pinarello is TSX and I have always enjoyed the road feel. I think it calls for some Look pp396 or Time pedals keeping with the period.

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