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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Recessed brake nuts/modern calipers and your retro-modern bike

    I've seen the sheldon brown article on it and it seems like reaming out the holes in my steel frame will probably be the best way to get them to work. I'm trying to run modern Centaur brakes on my 83 bianchi, and the studs on the calipers (the threaded part that usually goes into the barke bridge/fork) is too short to run all the way through the brake bridge/fork crown. but before i start drilling i'd like to see what other people have done. Is there a way to change the stud length on the calipers? i'd just as soon use a regular nut if it saves me some trouble or potential damage to my paint (should have done this while it was stripped!!!)

  2. #2
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    What I did might not be strictly sano, but what I did was put the modern front brakes with their longer stud on the rear, and put the modern back brake on the front with a longer "shouldered bolt nut". You have to flip the brake pads around as well. Did I describe that well enough? Or did I misunderstand what you are doing? If you just need a longer stud and yours are not cast but screwed in like most or need a longer shouldered bolt nut on the front brake, you can buy either of those from your local LBS or Loosescrews.

    I am like you, I did not want to drill it out if I did not have to, so try some other options first.
    Last edited by Tucson_2011; 04-20-2012 at 07:04 PM.

  3. #3
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    yeah i am on that same path flipping F to R, though the drilled hole in my fork isn't wide enough for the "shouldered bolt nuts" i've got in hand. the hole is ~6mm and my bolt/nuts are 8mm so i would still have to ream out the hole. i don't think it's avoidable at this point, but hopefully warming up the paint and being gentle with the drill will keep the paint from chipping/flaking. it's a little bit frightening tbh.

  4. #4
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    One possible solution;. check out these Tektro brakes at Harris Cyclery . Brakes for Bicycles from Harris Cyclery. In the past I have switched single pivot bolts between different brands. These Tektro bikes have nutted pivot bolts for dual pivot brakes. It may be possible to replace the Campy recessed pivot bolt with a Tektro nutted version (different maker dual pivot brakes are even more similar than the single pivot version).

    I have done the front back/switch and drilled the rear of my fork and used a long recessed nut; it works but the Tektro may allow you a drill free way.

    Edit Well I tried switching pivot axles between a Centaur dual pivot recessed and a Tektro DP recessed and the axles are almost identical. Campy/Tekro dual pivot axles has a 7mm thread at the top and 6mm thread at the end (the 7mm portion is what holds the brake caliper together and the 6mm is what holds the brake to either to the fork or rear bridge; the campy caliper is a little wider than the Tektro, so the 7mm portion on the Campy is about 2.5 mm longer then the Tektro, which still leaves plenty of thread when the Tektro axle is installed in the Campy brake, but would require about a 1-2mm washer behind the locknut when the Campy axle installed in the Tektro so the 7mm portion doesn't protrude beyond the locknut. Still, this would work!
    Last edited by onespeedbiker; 04-24-2012 at 03:03 PM.
    E fatto espresso divieto di partecipare alla manifestazione con biciclette che non possiedano i suddetti requisiti.Ogni tentativo di farlo a mangiare un piatto di grandi dimensioni di 3 settimane la polenta e in genere di divertimento, soprattutto se egli straniero.

  5. #5
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    I used the Tektro long reach brakes on my Motobecane as well, very sharp looking, strong acting brakes and they allowed me some more options in fitting. I did not have to ream anything, but I did have to try a few combinations of stuff from my local LBS to get it right.

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