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  1. #1
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    Vintage Olmo Competition, not sure what year.

    Just got this Olmo Competition off Ebay, from Provence, France. Always wanted one since I saw a metallic grey or could have been a silver one being ridden in Centennial Park, Sydney in 1985. Particularly wanted one in a little bit bigger size than I ride in modern frames as I prefer less seatpost in a vintage frame. This is a size 55, so 55 c-t in the seat tube but measures 54 c-c, ST x 54 c-c, TT.

    Love to work out which era this belongs to so that I could eventually obtain period correct parts. In the mean time I just want to get it on the road.

    I don't have a stem for it so I'm looking for a Cinelli 1A (110mm) as the cable guides over the BB suggest at least a pre-XA vintage.

    Also may have it repainted to silver or maybe ice blue, but still want to keep it 'correct' colour wise too. OCD runs in my family. Any other colour options? The pearl red may grow on me though.

    Thanks in anticipation.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Vintage Olmo Competition, not sure what year.-olmocompetion55.jpg   Vintage Olmo Competition, not sure what year.-olmocbb9253.jpg   Vintage Olmo Competition, not sure what year.-olmocbb9251.jpg  
    Last edited by Marz; 07-11-2011 at 09:07 PM.

  2. #2
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    No one know anything about Olmos? No interest anywhere?

  3. #3
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    Beautiful Olmo frame, IŽd say it is from the early 80ies, around 1981-83. And donŽt repaint it, it looks great as it is in my opinion.

  4. #4
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    Thanks mike01. Would like to get the appropriate vintage parts. Am thinking Cinelli 1A stem, nuovo Record rear der. Confused with front der and crankset, vintage ones all look the same.

    Bought Turbo seat recently as it looks like it's from the era so I'll ride with that.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marz View Post
    Thanks mike01. Would like to get the appropriate vintage parts. Am thinking Cinelli 1A stem, nuovo Record rear der. Confused with front der and crankset, vintage ones all look the same.

    Bought Turbo seat recently as it looks like it's from the era so I'll ride with that.
    Hi, Marz, yeah Cinelli 1/A, Nuovo Record and Turbo are exactly the kind of parts that would suit that frame for a period correct build. To get a grip on the Record/Nuovo Record parts from that time look here http://www.velobase.com/Resource_Too...alogScans.aspx

  6. #6
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    Did the Olmo frames from 1981 - 1983 feature a chrome chainstay? I'm asking since I think I recall seeing them on 1986 and later Olmos (which may only mean I didn't get out enough). A pic of the tubing decal might help.

    I wouldn't repaint it, either.
    Last edited by bicyclerepairman; 07-17-2011 at 06:44 AM.

  7. #7
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    Tubing decal only says 'columbus'. It doesn't specify SL or SLX. Usually means SL.

  8. #8
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    'I wouldn't repaint it, either. '

    Big scratches on other side, try to show photos of more blemishes later.

  9. #9
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    Just finished putting it together. Took it for a 60km shakedown ride and it rode beautifully. Also very light bike or at least felt that way.

    Only problem is the Record brakes, are they usually harder to apply than modern ones? Took apart the front brake, cleaned and greased it and still felt like the return spring was too strong, unlike my modern Campagnolo brakes which feel feather light in comparison.

    I've built it up with what was at hand so if I'm still into it next year I'll slowly update to period correct or maybe just keep riding as is, haven't made up my mind. All the vintage stuff is so expensive as everyone probably knows already.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Vintage Olmo Competition, not sure what year.-olmocompfinished.jpg  

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marz View Post
    Just finished putting it together. Took it for a 60km shakedown ride and it rode beautifully. Also very light bike or at least felt that way.

    Only problem is the Record brakes, are they usually harder to apply than modern ones? Took apart the front brake, cleaned and greased it and still felt like the return spring was too strong, unlike my modern Campagnolo brakes which feel feather light in comparison.

    I've built it up with what was at hand so if I'm still into it next year I'll slowly update to period correct or maybe just keep riding as is, haven't made up my mind. All the vintage stuff is so expensive as everyone probably knows already.
    Campagnolo brakes have never been that strong until they went to dual pivot (and even then that was only for the front wheel). When asked about his brakes, Tullio Campagnolo said, brakes are to slow the bicycle down, not stop it. The weakness of the brakes have a lot to do with the pull ratio of the levers; similar Shimano brakes are stronger. Of course retro components have always been form over function. Expect you are going to have to grab a handful of brakes and squeeze like your life depends on it; the real strength of the early Campy brakes was they would stay centered when no other brake would. At the time they were years ahead of their competitors.

  11. #11
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    You did a great job on the restoration, and your Olmo is a beautiful bike. I bet it rides like a dream. A number of folks more knowledgeable than me have told me that SL frames are the nicest riding.

    Regarding the brakes, retro brakes in general just aren't as good as the newer ones. That is one area where newer is better. If you don't care about being period correct, some nice silver Chorus or Record dual pivot brakes from the mid-90s or so would be a huge improvement.

  12. #12
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    Thanks for the compliments tarwheel2. Needs a vintage seatpost, steel derailleur housing, Campagnolo Record FD and cranks and period wheels. The current cranks and FD are Galli, which are great copies and work perfectly.

    I have an Australian made 531C frame and the Olmo is much lighter than the Reynolds frame as well as having a definately better and smoother ride. Loving the Columbus SL.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marz View Post
    Thanks for the compliments tarwheel2. Needs a vintage seatpost, steel derailleur housing, Campagnolo Record FD and cranks and period wheels. The current cranks and FD are Galli, which are great copies and work perfectly.

    I have an Australian made 531C frame and the Olmo is much lighter than the Reynolds frame as well as having a definately better and smoother ride. Loving the Columbus SL.
    I forgot to say as the others did, you have put together one fine bike! But I am curious about your statement wanting a "steel derailleur housing". If you are referring to the rear derailleur, the steel housing variety ended in about 1964.

  14. #14
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    By "steel derailleur housing", I meant the rear cable housing that is seen on vintage bikes, goes from chain stay braze-on to rear dearailleur.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marz View Post
    By "steel derailleur housing", I meant the rear cable housing that is seen on vintage bikes, goes from chain stay braze-on to rear derailleur.
    Oh!! Those! Never used them. During the age of Nuovo Record (and back to the original Gran Sport; before housings were even invented) Campy supplied those housings. Eventually housing quality became better, but Campagnolo continued to supply them until their Ergo hit the scene. They certainly look retro, but using a short piece of modern derailleur cable and housing works better.

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