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  1. #1
    Burning Fists of Love
    Reputation: ttug's Avatar
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    is your retro machine your main ride

    All- Morbid curiosity, do you all ride your retro machines as your main ride?
    This old anvil has cracked alot of hammers

  2. #2
    Old and Fixed, Moderator
    Reputation: Dave Hickey's Avatar
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    yep.........
    Dave Hickey/ Fort Worth

    My 3Rensho Blog: http://vintage3rensholove.blogspot.com/

  3. #3
    Baltic Scum
    Reputation: seeborough's Avatar
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    Nope. The classics came with a sunshine-only-clause and have not seen a drop of water since they joined the family. Any chance of rain and it's either a Cannondale or something with fenders.
    Was juckt es die stolze Eiche, wenn sich ein Schwein an ihr kratzt?

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: latman's Avatar
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    no , I am afraid of rust and scratches so I will never take steel frame out if there is a chace of rain , otherwise i try to rotate all my roadies ,(currently 4 soon to be 6)

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    The only bike I have now is 80's Italian steel, ride it in everything. I got rid of my carbon ride awhile ago to cover some unemployment time, and have never felt the need to replace it since the ride on my retro is just too good.

  6. #6
    Burning Fists of Love
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    ok ok

    Look, I CANT AFFORD to drop money on a new bike with what I want, I am , by my own admission, a retro virgin. I cant do mechanical things well, and thusm my questions.

    I can lay brick, cut pipe, etc etc, but the mechanics of bike maintenance and restoration and I never really became friends, I know I know, it my fault. I very vey ,uch appreciate your patience with me and my naive questions.


    I will ride the piss out of my 30+ year old frame when I get it restored.

    By the way, yuou guysd gotta work on your sarcasm more, jeesh.
    This old anvil has cracked alot of hammers

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    My 88 Sirrus is my main ride for inclement weather and hauling to Knoxville when I work down there. I try to take very good care of it, however. My newer and newest bikes are both steel. I really don't worry about the rain, since I wipe it off and put it up after rides. Some of you seem to think that steel will rust you one even says the word "rain",

  8. #8
    Devoid of all flim-flam
    Reputation: Mapei's Avatar
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    My retro machine gets regular use as a toodle-around-the-neighborhood bike. But if the ride is the least bit serious, I go to my modern bike, a 2006 Time Edge Translink with Campy 10. The Time is just a heck of a lot more fun and satisfying a bicycle. The Time allows me to go longer, further and faster. The only places my retro bike has the Time beat is in charm, and in a quieter freewheel.
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

  9. #9
    Baltic Scum
    Reputation: seeborough's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ttug
    By the way, yuou guysd gotta work on your sarcasm more, jeesh.
    Don't know about latman, but I was actually serious. Some of my bikes don't get to go out in the muck.

    That's why they sell Madones.*









    *Sarcasm**









    **Sort of.
    Was juckt es die stolze Eiche, wenn sich ein Schwein an ihr kratzt?

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    My favorite ride for midweek hammerfest & long weekend group rides are my mid-80's steel bikes equipped with modern 10-speed. If I'm riding alone I would favor my down-tube friction shifting vintage steel rides. When its there's threat of rain its time for the titanium
    bike with fenders.
    Quote Originally Posted by ttug
    Look, I CANT AFFORD to drop money on a new bike with what I want, I am , by my own admission, a retro virgin. I cant do mechanical things well, and thusm my questions.
    I can lay brick, cut pipe, etc etc, but the mechanics of bike maintenance and restoration and I never really became friends, I know I know, it my fault. I very very much appreciate your patience with me and my naive questions.
    Just keep asking away & searching the archives for the gaps in your knowledge. Before you know it you'll get the hang of wrenching on your vintage gear. They're really very forgiving and require basic maintenance tools you probably already have.

  11. #11
    WA outdoor enthusiast
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    Wet rides see me on fendered bikes - '85 Bianchi or '84 Centurion
    Casual or recovery rides are vintage.
    Group rides go modern. (I like closer gear spacing)

  12. #12
    Decrepit Member
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    When all the bikes I owned were vintage, they were the bikes I rode. Everything changed when I got my Waterford with Campy Record/Ergo shifters. Basically, 95% of my riding is now done on the Waterford. I love the hassle-free shifting and the wide gearing of the compact double.

    I built up a NOS '94 Paramount frameset for a friend using 11-s Chorus, and the modern drivetrain on a light (753 OS) vintage frameset is a winning combination. If I didn't have the Waterford, I'd probably do something similar for my main ride.
    -Stan
    my bikes

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    That wouldn't necessarily stop you from having a retro as your main ride I think. I have a rain bike too, but it only goes out in the rain so I don't consider it as my main bike, rather my 2000 CSI is really my main ride backed up by a thoroughly modern/retro 85 Merckx. Now one could say in my location (Seattle) that my rain bike just might be my main ride if you are counting seat time, but that's not really the case. I would say the split (rain bike vs main bike is 15/85%. If I know it's going to be good weather, it's the Merckx. If I think there's a chance I may get rained on but not much of one, it's the CSI. If it's raining when I go out or going to rain, it's the rain bike.
    Quote Originally Posted by seeborough
    Nope. The classics came with a sunshine-only-clause and have not seen a drop of water since they joined the family. Any chance of rain and it's either a Cannondale or something with fenders.
    Last edited by martinrjensen; 03-13-2011 at 01:40 PM.

  14. #14
    Burning Fists of Love
    Reputation: ttug's Avatar
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    ride the ride

    Quote Originally Posted by seeborough
    Don't know about latman, but I was actually serious. Some of my bikes don't get to go out in the muck.

    That's why they sell Madones.*









    *Sarcasm**









    **Sort of.
    My other road bike is a 99 Bianchi Brava and it has seen ALL weather. I just cleaned it onece a week and never saw a rust issue. This is the bike that has seen at least 6 + 10K mile seasons. I love it.

    My current retro project, just feels stronger/smoother. This is with its current wheels, and it needs work. I cant wait to get it back to road readiness.
    This old anvil has cracked alot of hammers

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Yep. My only ride is an 87 Trek 560 Pro Series with original drivetrain. Purely recreational and for staying fit. Rarely sees the rain. Smooth like butter but I'm starting to wonder when my 61 year old bones and back will need a more comfortable less racy geometry. But then again, did you see the 100 year old gentleman on TV this morning who does 17 hilly miles everyday?

  16. #16
    Bikespace member
    Reputation: moschika's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scooper
    When all the bikes I owned were vintage, they were the bikes I rode. Everything changed when I got my Waterford with Campy Record/Ergo shifters. Basically, 95% of my riding is now done on the Waterford. I love the hassle-free shifting and the wide gearing of the compact double.

    I built up a NOS '94 Paramount frameset for a friend using 11-s Chorus, and the modern drivetrain on a light (753 OS) vintage frameset is a winning combination. If I didn't have the Waterford, I'd probably do something similar for my main ride.
    what about the bike you built with Sanner?
    Quote Originally Posted by Jesse D Smith
    You can always tell the guy that started his day with a proper shave versus the guy who started his day slappin' it to internet porn.

  17. #17
    Vintage bike and rider
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    Last year my all-around ride was a 1980 Woodrup Giro. This year, when her new fork is installed, it'll be a 1984 Trek 610, but it's mainly being set up for wet/dry brevets. Working on a UO-8 for most around-town riding. Until the distance bike is done, endurance training will be on my 1983 (?) Mondonico with tubulars and Campy 10. It's a hottie!

    I guess I don't own anything new. Should I?

  18. #18
    Vintage cyclist
    Reputation: frpax's Avatar
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    My newest bike is a 2002 LeMond. I rode it the most until I got:
    Mid '80s Concorde that I ride for my "go fast" riding,
    and a 1990 Trek 790 that is now my commuter.

  19. #19
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    No. I rotate between the three bikes regularly and evenly.

  20. #20
    Decrepit Member
    Reputation: Scooper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moschika
    what about the bike you built with Sanner?
    I'm in the midst of replacing the rear dropouts right now. I wanted to do it before chrome plating the rear triangle. It's good experience for me.
    -Stan
    my bikes

  21. #21
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: pigpen's Avatar
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    The newest bike I own is a 2002 SwissCross.
    My road bike is a '98.
    Rain or shine.

  22. #22
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tarwheel2's Avatar
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    Depends on what you consider retro, but in some sense all of my bikes (and riding) are retro. My commuter/touring bike is only 2 years old, but it's a Bob Jackson with a lugged steel frame and bar-end shifters. It's old-school design but all new parts. All of my other bikes are lugged steel except my ti Eddy Merckx and that frame is 12-13 years old. My most retro bike is my De Bernardi SL with downtube shifters, and I ride it the least of my bikes mainly because it's not set up for daily riding.

  23. #23
    likes shiny bikes
    Reputation: rhauft's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ttug
    All- Morbid curiosity, do you all ride your retro machines as your main ride?
    No, especially not with the wet winter we're having here in Northern Cal. My retro's are for retro rides and gawking. Two of them are on display at a local bike shop.

    My Dogma & Prince are my Saturday pro ride hammers. My S-Works is my race/training tool.
    2012 Pinarello Dogma2 / SR11ti
    2010 Specialized SL3 S-Works / Red
    2008 Orbea Ordu TT / Red
    2000 Pinarello Prince Team Banesto R10
    1997 Pinarello Vuelta Team Banesto / R10
    1994 Pinarello Stelvio / C-R8
    1989 Pinarello Montello / C-R6

  24. #24
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Depends on the weather and the purpose...

    The Zunow (90-91) comes out to play if it's a pleasure ride with no locking/leaving involved. Now that the snow is gone and it's getting warmer, I see many more miles on this one, which makes me very, very happy

    The old Tomasso (90-91) has been single-speeded and sees fairly heavy commute duty (was my only commute bike until last fall) if the weather is dry and I don't have much to carry.

    The Cross Check (with rack/full fenders/ortleibs) is my main commuter now, simply because it keeps me/my feet/my load dryer and carrying all the crap I usually carry on my commute is easier/more comfortable on the rack than on my back.

  25. #25
    Bikespace member
    Reputation: moschika's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scooper
    I'm in the midst of replacing the rear dropouts right now. I wanted to do it before chrome plating the rear triangle. It's good experience for me.
    what was wrong with the original drop-outs?
    Quote Originally Posted by Jesse D Smith
    You can always tell the guy that started his day with a proper shave versus the guy who started his day slappin' it to internet porn.

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