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  1. #1
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    Is the Addict frame of 'lugged' or 'monocoque' construction?

    I have read that the Addict frame is a monocoque design and then somewhere else that it's of a lugged construction. It doesn't look like a 'lugged' design like Colnago, Look and Time frames are. Please could someone let me know how the Addict is constructed and how the tubes are joined together. Also are the HMF and HMX frames constructed in the same way? Thanks very much in advance for any information.
    Last edited by miurasv; 03-20-2011 at 01:56 PM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by miurasv
    I have read that the Addict frame is a monocoque design and then somewhere else that it's of a lugged construction. It doesn't look like a 'lugged' design like Colnago, Look and time frames are. Please could someone let me know how the Addict is constructed and how the tubes are joined together. Also are the HMF and HMX frames constructed in the same way? Thanks very much in advance for any information.
    There is one set of tooling for the Addict line, probably more for cost reasons than anything else, but the happy result is nearly identical frames throughout the line, HMF and HMX carbon included. As you observed, a quick glance at an Addict is enough to confirm the absence of lugs.

    If you buy an Addict, enjoy your bike . . . they are amazingly nice rides, in my experience. Mine is a bottom of line R4 with HMF net carbon and easily the nicest frame I have ever owned.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by TucsonMTB
    There is one set of tooling for the Addict line, probably more for cost reasons than anything else, but the happy result is nearly identical frames throughout the line, HMF and HMX carbon included. As you observed, a quick glance at an Addict is enough to confirm the absence of lugs.

    If you buy an Addict, enjoy your bike . . . they are amazingly nice rides, in my experience. Mine is a bottom of line R4 with HMF net carbon and easily the nicest frame I have ever owned.
    Thanks for your reply, TucsonMTB. I too have an Addict R4 (2008). So is the Addict monocoque construction? Out of interest do you know how monococoques are made? I read somwewhere that the frames or the tubes are made in mirror images from molds in 2 halves and then bonded together. Is this correct? Thanks again.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by miurasv
    Thanks for your reply, TucsonMTB. I too have an Addict R4 (2008). So is the Addict monocoque construction? Out of interest do you know how monococoques are made? I read somwewhere that the frames or the tubes are made in mirror images from molds in 2 halves and then bonded together. Is this correct? Thanks again.
    Scott doesn't offer factory tours and I don't live in Taiwan, so no . . . I can't say I know how they are made. Sorry.

    By definition: "Monocoque is a construction technique that supports structural load by using an object's exterior, as opposed to using an internal frame or truss that is then covered with a non-load-bearing skin or coachwork. The word monocoque comes from the Greek for single (mono) and French for shell (coque). The technique may also be called structural skin, stressed skin, unit body, unibody, unitary construction, or Body Frame Integral (BFI)."
    Credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monocoq...eeled_vehicles

    Looking at my own frame, I suspect the main triangle is one mold with two mirrored sides that are clamped together and then the carbon fiber layup (placed inside before the mold is closed) is pressed into the mold surfaces by inflating a bladder inside of the carbon layup. That's just a guess based in part on comments about TREK's manufacturing process. I read it on the Internet, so it must be true.

    I haven't seen it, but have read that TREK allowed the production of a video of their carbon frame manufacturing. Perhaps you can find it and post a link.

  5. #5
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    Mono frames are bsically built in one piece over lapping the carbon layers to join all the different aspects such as the down and top tubes to the head tube
    the reas triangel to the front etc

    Some techniques like trek use a lugged construction but dont show lugs as you have described on frames like the looks etc

    so it is possible to have a lugged frame that looks like it is of monocoque contruction
    they do this by making the ends of the tube smaler in diameter so the slide into the lug giving it a flat join

    Twiggy73

  6. #6
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    The Scott bikes use what is called 'tube to tube' construction....

    Tubes are made, cut & mitered, then joined together with carbon added to the joint area to create a secure connection.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tino Chiappelli
    The Scott bikes use what is called 'tube to tube' construction....

    Tubes are made, cut & mitered, then joined together with carbon added to the joint area to create a secure connection.
    That may be "old news". I understand "tube to tube" is the construction technique for the original CR1 (not including 2010 models). My Addict has an "IMP Technology" graphic on the top tube. Apparently, IMP refers to Integrated Molding Process, as illustrated below in a graphic stolen from an unrelated article about another Scott frame.



    You can read more about Scott's recent IMP usage in constructing their newer road bikes on the Scott website at: http://www.scott-sports.com/us_en/ne...uct/45096/2370

    Admittedly, the rear triangle is still "tube to tube" construction, but not the main triangle. So, your observation is certainly valid. Plus, you prompted me to do some additional searching and I now have a couple of additional, useless facts stored, at least temporarily, in memory.
    Last edited by TucsonMTB; 06-30-2010 at 03:17 PM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by TucsonMTB
    That may be "old news". I understand "tube to tube" is the construction technique for the original CR1 (not including 2010 models). My Addict has an "IMP Technology" graphic on the top tube. Apparently, IMP refers to Integrated Molding Process, as illustrated below in a graphic stolen from an unrelated article about another Scott frame.
    :
    I stand corrected! Thanks for the update, good for me to see.....


  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by TucsonMTB
    That may be "old news". I understand "tube to tube" is the construction technique for the original CR1 (not including 2010 models). My Addict has an "IMP Technology" graphic on the top tube. Apparently, IMP refers to Integrated Molding Process, as illustrated below in a graphic stolen from an unrelated article about another Scott frame.



    You can read more about Scott's recent IMP usage in constructing their newer road bikes on the Scott website at: http://www.scott-sports.com/us_en/ne...uct/45096/2370

    Admittedly, the rear triangle is still "tube to tube" construction, but not the main triangle. So, your observation is certainly valid. Plus, you prompted me to do some additional searching and I now have a couple of additional, useless facts stored, at least temporarily, in memory.

    Thanks for the excellent information, TucsonMTB.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by miurasv
    Thanks for the excellent information, TucsonMTB.
    My pleasure! You need to give Tino Chiappelli at least partial credit. My "Google Fu" only works well when I have a good starting point and the "tube to tube" hint was part of it!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TucsonMTB
    My pleasure! You need to give Tino Chiappelli at least partial credit. My "Google Fu" only works well when I have a good starting point and the "tube to tube" hint was part of it!
    I appreciate all your replies including those from Tino Chiappelli and Twiggy73. Thanks very much, chaps.

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