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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    new bike—fierte steel?

    I'm in the market for a first road bike and can spend in the $2500 range. Most of the bikes in that price point are carbon--I've ridden the LeMond Zurich and will test ride a Cannondale Synapse and even a CAAD for comparison with aluminum. I'm intrigued by the Serotta steel, however, which one of the LBS's I like carries and is in this price point.

    A few questions:
    1. I'm new to riding (less than a year) but love it. I commute up to 3 times a week (more in the summer), around 7 miles round trip, go for longer rides (25-50 miles) twice a week, and hope to get into events and centuries this summer. I like to push myself and climb hard--is the steel a viable option for this? Obvioiusly it's durable; will weight differences mean anything to me?

    2. Do components vary on the stock Serotta frame depending on the bike shop, or is there a standard package for the Fierte?

    3. How would Fierte riders talk me into the Fierte?

    Looking forward to riding all of these and upgrading from my current bike, a 1982 Schwinn Voyager loaner that I've actually come to love.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Pluto
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    There are many good bikes out there but I do have the Fierte 2005 model. I like the bike and while i am not at a race level I do well on group rides with class A and B riders. Recnetly I tried a titanium Ligthspeed at a LBS. I expected to be really impressed and then opening up my check book and buying another bike. To my surprise I like my Steel Fierte better. Granted there are other variable such as wheeels, Fit and etc but over all I was convinced that I had no need to buy that bike. I will likely try a high end carbon bike in the future to see how they ride. I am also interested in trying a time trial bike. If I was to do it again I would likely upgrade to the custom size steel model. Good luck with what ever you choose.

  3. #3
    Pluto
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    I forgot to answer some of your questions. You can put anything on the frame as far as hardware. I did Ultegra on the hardware, FSA compact crank, carbon seat post and fork. Mavic elite wheels. If I was to do again I would likely go with Mavic SL wheels.

    I do not think I would want to talk you in to anything. Rather I wanted to point out what I know about the bike and let you decide.

  4. #4
    Spokane, Washington
    Reputation: DaveT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve314
    I'm in the market for a first road bike and can spend in the $2500 range. Most of the bikes in that price point are carbon--I've ridden the LeMond Zurich and will test ride a Cannondale Synapse and even a CAAD for comparison with aluminum. I'm intrigued by the Serotta steel, however, which one of the LBS's I like carries and is in this price point.

    A few questions:
    1. I'm new to riding (less than a year) but love it. I commute up to 3 times a week (more in the summer), around 7 miles round trip, go for longer rides (25-50 miles) twice a week, and hope to get into events and centuries this summer. I like to push myself and climb hard--is the steel a viable option for this? Obvioiusly it's durable; will weight differences mean anything to me?

    2. Do components vary on the stock Serotta frame depending on the bike shop, or is there a standard package for the Fierte?

    3. How would Fierte riders talk me into the Fierte?

    Looking forward to riding all of these and upgrading from my current bike, a 1982 Schwinn Voyager loaner that I've actually come to love.

    Thanks.
    1. Weight means little to the average rider. The difference between a well made steel frame and a well made frame of other material will be relatively small, a few pounds generally. A standard bicycle water bottle holds about 1 1/2 pounds of water for example.

    2. Serotta doesn't sell complete bikes, the components are selected by the customers at the dealer.

    3. Try the Serotta forum: http://www.serotta.com/forum/
    Trying to cram the rest of my life into the rest of my life!

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    I have a 2006 Fierte steel. Overall, I am very happy with the bike. I use it for similar purposes to you, occassional commuting, and longer group rides and events.

    The bike is extremely comfortable, I feel great even after 4 - 6 hours riding. It absorbs road buzz, but still feels lively not dead. I like the handling - its not as aggressive as some bikes I tried, but I'm confident on it in NYC traffic - which says something I think.

    It doesn't feel like it accelerates as resposively as some other bikes I've tried, so I wouldn't recommend it for someone who loves to sprint, or a crit racer.

    I never really notice the weight. I think my build comes in around 19-20lbs. If I spent a ton more on a sub 16lb bike, maybe I'd notice the difference on the hills, but at the level I ride, it just doesn't mean much.

    I think there are stock configurations, but you should be able to change that however you like. I run full ultegra, which is more than enough for me. I did upgrade the stock fork to the reynolds ouza pro - I am happy about that decision. I have easton vista sl wheels, which have held up well, but they may be the one item I will consider upgrading.

  6. #6
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    I have an ultegra gruppo and am happy. I am thinking about giving myself a treat. Any opinions regarding the stronglight crankset and BB. I am a relative newbie so be patient.

    Thanks

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul fuhr
    I have an ultegra gruppo and am happy. I am thinking about giving myself a treat. Any opinions regarding the stronglight crankset and BB. I am a relative newbie so be patient.
    I don't have any experience with stronglight cranks, but I asked Ramjm_2000 about a set he has on his Lynskey. He made a few comments that may be of interest to you, Lynskey Level 3 . There's also quite a few people using them at http://weightweenies.starbike.com/. Have fun with your research.

  8. #8
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    You would buy a Fierte because you like it's rich heritage and are a recreational rider looking for all day riding comfort. It can be used for touring and racing, too, but fast club rides and longer distance weekend rides would be it's forte. There are probably some lighter, stiffer carbon bikes that climb faster. Dealers build up the frames for spec or by order. I believe the frame and fork are all that come from Serotta.

  9. #9
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    2006 Fierte

    I can only relay my experience with the fierte. I got a used '06 model with full DA groupo. I am not a racer just a recreational rider and I love the comfort and handling of this bike. It is great on any length ride but shines on the 4+ hour rides. I am coming from an older Cannondale AL which tended to beat me up , I have not noticed any performance issues. It is a great , comfy, stable ride. You should take a test ride for yourself.
    Serotta leaves the build up to the client to pick the groupo.

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Did you buy anything yet? Pictures?

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