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  1. #1
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    CGR seatpost...why oh why did I wait so long?

    Wow.

    One word is all it takes to describe this thing.

    I bought one last Nov but thanks to this rotten winter, I have not had a chance to ride on this seatpost outside. Until yesterday that is...

    This winter has been brutal (as it has been across the US) and out local roads have taken a beating, plenty of new potholes and cracks everywhere. I took to the road yesterday for the first time in months and the seatpost was...well...not noticeable in the slightest. It actually took me some time to figure out exactly how smooth this thing really is. About 30min into the ride it dawned on me how soft the ride was on my rear. My hands were shaking an vibrating like crazy and my bum...silky smooth.

    This post will not remove everything but it removes nearly all vibrations and makes my somewhat harsh Tarmac nearly as smooth on the bum as the '09 SL2 Roubaix I spent summer of '12 riding.

    Long story short...I shouldn't have waited so long...what a difference that post makes.

  2. #2
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    I have one on my Roubaix SL4, it works quite well. I recently swapped back to a regular carbon seat post to try a different saddle and it confirmed to me how well the CG-R post works.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Typetwelve View Post
    Wow.

    One word is all it takes to describe this thing.

    I bought one last Nov but thanks to this rotten winter, I have not had a chance to ride on this seatpost outside. Until yesterday that is...

    This winter has been brutal (as it has been across the US) and out local roads have taken a beating, plenty of new potholes and cracks everywhere. I took to the road yesterday for the first time in months and the seatpost was...well...not noticeable in the slightest. It actually took me some time to figure out exactly how smooth this thing really is. About 30min into the ride it dawned on me how soft the ride was on my rear. My hands were shaking an vibrating like crazy and my bum...silky smooth.

    This post will not remove everything but it removes nearly all vibrations and makes my somewhat harsh Tarmac nearly as smooth on the bum as the '09 SL2 Roubaix I spent summer of '12 riding.

    Long story short...I shouldn't have waited so long...what a difference that post makes.
    I'm very interested in this post but wonder how saddle height and tilt are affected. Did you have to compensate for the movement of the saddle when you set this up? Can you actually see the saddle move up and down when pushing on it or does it just absorb vibrations?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpjumper FSR View Post
    I'm very interested in this post but wonder how saddle height and tilt are affected. Did you have to compensate for the movement of the saddle when you set this up? Can you actually see the saddle move up and down when pushing on it or does it just absorb vibrations?
    Height is a non-issue, just move seat post up or down to get the desired height. I don't adjust the tilt of my saddle with the CG-R (I level the saddle) but I run my saddle almost all the way forward. The further back you run your saddle the more sagging you may get. Keep in mind, the CG-R post has a LOT of set back. I measured 1.4cm further back than the stock seat post on my Roubaix SL2.

    As far as movement, you can feel it in the saddle if you focus on it. By the second ride it was completely natural and I didn't notice anything. You have to push the saddle pretty hard to see movement when you're off the bike. If your local Specialized dealer has any bikes with a CG-R post you could always take one for a test ride.

  5. #5
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    Claims that the Cobl-Gobl seat post has a lot of set back have been puzzling us. Fact is, it doesn’t have a lot of set back and has a standard set back of 25mm. The same as the Pave seat post and most other seat posts on the market. It’s your stock seat posts that only have 15mm of set back is the issue.
    Anyway, loving my Cobl- Gobl seat post so much I now have the renamed CG-R on my second bike now. No difference between the two apart from name and paint finish.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrynD4321 View Post
    Claims that the Cobl-Gobl seat post has a lot of set back have been puzzling us.
    It's a recurring theme from people who actually own them. How about this - it has a lot more setback than the stock seat post Specialized specs on my bike? The point we're making here is that the CG-R post may not work for some riders. I think that's worth pointing out before someone drops $200 on a seat post that they may not be able to return after it's installed.
    Last edited by Dunbar; 03-13-2014 at 03:51 PM.

  7. #7
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    I was planning to buy one of these. Why do you say it may not work for some riders?
    Thanks,
    Russ

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crispyraisin View Post
    I was planning to buy one of these. Why do you say it may not work for some riders?
    Because you might not be able to get the saddle far enough forward with the CG-R post. I'm saying maybe. Not that it definitely will, or will, not work for you.

  9. #9
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    Thanks. So if the CG-R setback is 10 mm more than the stock post, I would need 10 mm of forward travel available to set it up the same as it currently.
    Thanks for the info.
    Russ

  10. #10
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    Yes, although I measured 14mm more setback compared to the stock seat post on my Roubaix SL2 (54cm.)

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dunbar View Post
    It's a recurring theme from people who actually own them. How about this - it has a lot more setback than the stock seat post Specialized specs on my bike? The point we're making here is that the CG-R post may not work for some riders. I think that's worth pointing out before someone drops $200 on a seat post that they may not be able to return after it's installed.
    I think you need to produce evidence of your claim...in bold.
    This will take two pictures + ruler + dimensions.
    Otherwise the COBL post has 25mm setback which is pretty common for setback posts throughout the industry.

  12. #12
    Neb
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadworthy View Post
    I think you need to produce evidence of your claim...in bold.
    This will take two pictures + ruler + dimensions.
    Otherwise the COBL post has 25mm setback which is pretty common for setback posts throughout the industry.
    I'm guessing the stock post came with 15mm of setback, while the CGR post apparently has 25mm setback. Specialized doesn't seem to list the amount of setback on their site, so it's fair enough to emphasize that it's got 25mm of setback.

    That being said you're right, it's a pretty common amount of setback...

  13. #13
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    I just measured mine the best I could. 28mm

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    Quote Originally Posted by roadworthy View Post
    I think you need to produce evidence of your claim...in bold.This will take two pictures + ruler + dimensions.
    I did measure it as have 14mm more setback than the stock seat post that came on my 2013 SL2 Roubaix (54cm). I did not take pictures. Sorry, but I'm not gonna go through the hassle of swapping seat posts again just to prove it here.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dunbar View Post
    Height is a non-issue, just move seat post up or down to get the desired height. I don't adjust the tilt of my saddle with the CG-R (I level the saddle) but I run my saddle almost all the way forward. The further back you run your saddle the more sagging you may get. Keep in mind, the CG-R post has a LOT of set back. I measured 1.4cm further back than the stock seat post on my Roubaix SL2.

    As far as movement, you can feel it in the saddle if you focus on it. By the second ride it was completely natural and I didn't notice anything. You have to push the saddle pretty hard to see movement when you're off the bike. If your local Specialized dealer has any bikes with a CG-R post you could always take one for a test ride.
    Thank Dunbar, My bike shop has one set aside for me, can't wait to get it on the bike and try it out. According to the Specialized website it states the size as 27mm x 350mm; 25mm offset (SETBACK)

  16. #16
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    BTW, I did post this picture before when we were discussing setback on the CG-R. You can see the center of the seat clamp is quite a bit further back on the CG-R post compared to my regular carbon seat post.


  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dunbar View Post
    BTW, I did post this picture before when we were discussing setback on the CG-R. You can see the center of the seat clamp is quite a bit further back on the CG-R post compared to my regular carbon seat post.

    I think the 'confusion' in setback has to do with the definition and how they are made

    Setback is defined In relation to the pivot point of adjusting the seat angle

    The cgr pivot point is very high, some of the two bolt seat posts have a lower pivot point

    So for instance my Ritchie two bolt the center of the pivot point is 25mm from the center of the post and so is the cgr

    However the clamp is setback more on the cgr

    As for setup, at least in my case, the seat has to be more nose done because when you put weight on it, it pivots up

    And today when I could barely pedal on the way home and was sagging on the saddle I was thinking, maybe a tad more nose done would be good.

  18. #18
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    I believe the issue is not only the offset…but also where the seat post clamps on. Look at this pic:



    I'm a 6' tall, proportionate male riding a 56cm Tarmac. Needless to say, I am not stretched out on my bike by any means.

    That seat is SLAMMED forward…it literally will not go another mm. When I had my professional fit, he wasn't even sure if I was going to be able to use that seat post stating I may have to go back to the stock (Which is supposedly a 25mm offset as well). He kept pushing it more and more forward until it bottomed out and he said it just fits.

    They can claim a 25mm offset all they want and I am not going to try to measure the thing…but I will say this, an inch is an inch is an inch. That seat clamp is WAY farther back than 25mm/1in.

    Thankfully, in my case, it just barely works.

  19. #19
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    I was all set to buy one, then had one in my hands. It's got craploads of setback. Definitely won't work for me. Too bad as I love the idea.

  20. #20
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    I have one installed on my Crux and am enjoying it immensely. Also, per the previous posters, the setback does seem a bit extreme and I have my saddle set all the way forward to compensate. I was riding a 2012 Roubaix, and I'd have to say that the 2014 Crux with the CG-R is just as compliant as the Roubaix with a regular seatpost (or even better).

    CGR seatpost...why oh why did I wait so long?-cruxpro.jpg

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Typetwelve View Post
    I believe the issue is not only the offset…but also where the seat post clamps on. Look at this pic:



    I'm a 6' tall, proportionate male riding a 56cm Tarmac. Needless to say, I am not stretched out on my bike by any means.

    That seat is SLAMMED forward…it literally will not go another mm. When I had my professional fit, he wasn't even sure if I was going to be able to use that seat post stating I may have to go back to the stock (Which is supposedly a 25mm offset as well). He kept pushing it more and more forward until it bottomed out and he said it just fits.

    They can claim a 25mm offset all they want and I am not going to try to measure the thing…but I will say this, an inch is an inch is an inch. That seat clamp is WAY farther back than 25mm/1in.

    Thankfully, in my case, it just barely works.
    In bold...it isn't. Many are deceived by the new COBL post...because optically it looks like it has a lot more setback than it has. This is because of the forward offset which creates the pivoting/suspension effect and creates the illusion of more setback.

    This can be and is proved pictorially. A tenant of scale is...for an orthogonal (perpendicular in 2 views) view of any picture, a single dimension can be used as scale for other features. This is not unlike using a scale on a map for example.
    See below. I have constructed such a picture. All you have to do is compare the setback to the seat post diameter which is known to be 27.2mm. Amount of setback is not as wide as the width of the post. It is a bit less. This comports with the advertised setback of the COBL post which is stated to be 25mm which is accurate. The center of the saddle clamp shares the centerline with the single bolt that the post tilts around.

    A further word. The guys that develop this stuff are smart. They understand industry norms and the demographics of their customers. They aren't going to put a high end seat post out there that doesn't have appeal to this broad demographic. In the industry, the most popular setback for a setback post is 25mm. Many pros in the peloton ride this amount of setback. I do too for example. My seatpost of choice is the FSA K-force light 2 bolt with 25mm setback.

    All said, my disappointment with this post isn't the setback or its functionality. Everybody who rides it believes it to be a homerun. My gripe pertains to the use of a single bolt to not only control saddle tilt but clamping load. This asks a lot of a single bolt and why the most popular posts among racers are 2 bolt. The torque for that single bolt is a full 10 ft-lbs which to me is ridiculous for a standard L shaped allen wrench which requires a fair amount of hand strength. A torque wrench with an allen socket is best for this adjustment.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails CGR seatpost...why oh why did I wait so long?-cobl-setback.jpg  

  22. #22
    Neb
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    13.6 Nm (pdf)? That's rather impressive, I thought that the 12Nm spec for the Enve seatposts was quite a lot already.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neb View Post
    13.6 Nm (pdf)? That's rather impressive, I thought that the 12Nm spec for the Enve seatposts was quite a lot already.
    Yup...10 ft-lb = 120 in-lbs = 13.6 Nm.
    Point is...its needless. Spesh did a clean sheet design with this post. They could have made it 2 bolt which btw Spesh makes...they have a 2 bolt seatpost. Instead they cloned the Pave single bolt.

    Some simiple arithmetic...
    10 ft-lbs applied with a 4 inch long allen key = 30 lbs of hand force. So tightening the COBL post with a standard L shaped allen key is going to be a struggle on the road for many unless possessing strong hand strength. All 2 bolt posts are a fraction of this...for the simple reason that opposing bolt tension applies a lot more leverage to keep the saddle in position versus a pivot bolt which relies on a high level of compression.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadworthy View Post
    Some simiple arithmetic...
    10 ft-lbs applied with a 4 inch long allen key = 30 lbs of hand force. So tightening the COBL post with a standard L shaped allen key is going to be a struggle on the road for many unless possessing strong hand strength.
    I did not know this but I arrived at the same conclusion after the seat slipped and angled back a couple times in the middle of the ride. After the second time that happened I started applying a lot more torque with my allen key. I can't bring myself to buy a torque wrench just for my bike.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dunbar View Post
    I did not know this but I arrived at the same conclusion after the seat slipped and angled back a couple times in the middle of the ride. After the second time that happened I started applying a lot more torque with my allen key. I can't bring myself to buy a torque wrench just for my bike.
    Hi Dunbar,
    Yeah...an unfortunate by-product of 'one stop shopping'...the whole basis for a single bolt clamp which screws the pooch by trying to simplify saddle adjustment... which have been troubled way back to the day of the serrated single bolt Campy posts that used to slip at the most inopportune times. Old cyclists like me remember those days well. Few things spoil a ride more than losing your saddle tilt which we each take the time to set to get the saddle position just right to balance our weight where the sun don't shine. This is where micro adjustable 2 bolt clamps are much better...loosen a 1/4 turn on one bolt and tighten the other side to adjust the saddle by a fraction of a degree. A 2 bolt saddle can't loose its tilt by design. Can't beat a 2 bolt post and again why I was so disappointed in the new COBL post because it is such an outstanding concept and a simpler solution to what Trek did with their Domane. I will go a step further and say I believe a post of this nature with further refinement will be the future of cycling..promoting frameset rear triangles to have the stiffest of energy transfer and yet decouple the rider for best ride quality. I also believe Spesh could have styled the COBL post better....a bit of an eye sore as well...with its awkward looking forward offset which gives the illusion there is more setback than there is.

    A couple of years ago when I got my Roubaix frameset, it came with the Pave single bolt post which is the identical clamp design used for the COBL post. There is one section of road I used to ride in the Midwest where it would always slip because it is a rough patch and in a group ride we would often hammer this section to be done with it and that dam post would just slip. Unlike you, I own a few torque wrenches and learned just how much torque it takes to keep that saddle in place if you are a bigger rider in particular...I am 180# and just over 6'.

    A further tip I learned from a fellow owner is...disassemble the post clamp and clean bearing surfaces with alcohol. Be sure to disregard the spec picture below and NOT grease the contact surfaces...OK to grease the bolt but NOT the collar that relies on compression. Then apply a light coat of carbon paste and reassemble. This will increase surface friction and help keep saddle tilt at a lower torque. The joint is in effect a clutch of sorts...increase friction and the clutch will grab harder with less compression which is function of surface area and bolt tension. So try that if yours comes loose at the torque most guys can muster with a small allen wrench versus greater leverage of a long torque wrench and allen socket.

    Ride safe.

    Pic of the exploded joint below:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails CGR seatpost...why oh why did I wait so long?-spesh-pave-seatpost-joint.jpg  
    Last edited by roadworthy; 03-21-2014 at 02:41 AM.

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