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  1. #1
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    comparison of Roubaix SL3 S Works Vs 2017 S Works Futureshock

    Had an SL3 Roubaix S Works, which I loved. wasn't intending to change it, until I rode a 2017 Roubaix Expert with Future shock.

    I expected it to be more comfortable and soak up bumps and road buzz, but wasn't expecting it to be more responsive and zippier than the SL3 S Works, despite the lower grade carbon frame.

    So took the plunge and got a good deal on a 2017 S Works from Sigma Sport in London- £7000 ( RRP £8500 )

    Even zippier and more responsive, just as comfortable as the Expert ( with the medium spring installed )

    The hype really is true- it has moved the game on significantly



    Would even make a great gravel bike ( see video ) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOkKrPGSXoY
    Last edited by carrock; 07-29-2017 at 09:05 AM.

  2. #2
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    Your comments echo so many. Most expect a 'mushier' ride with the front shock and compliant seat post attachment, but the opposite is reflected by those fortunate to own the new bike. Quite an accomplishment by Specialized and if taking a dive into the design it actually makes more sense. The actual frame of the new Roubaix is one of the stiffest Specialized has produced. The front fork is very rigid which translates to laser like responsiveness and whole frame is super stiff because the rider is decoupled a bit by the seat post attachment including COBL saddle clamp. Genius design really and why coined bicycle of the year. As to the stiffer frame in spite a point or 2 lower in 'r' aka carbon modulus rating....proof positive the section modulus...aka 3D geometry/wall thickness etc trumps carbon modulus. Lower carbon modulus simply has a cost in stiffness and weight....stiffness being compensated by geometry. Perhaps the most remarkable thing is how light they made a frame this compliant. At some point, I too will likely replace my Roubaix SL3 I have just loved for 30,000 miles. A worthy successor to be sure.
    Ride safe.


    Quote Originally Posted by carrock View Post
    Had an SL3 Roubaix S Works, which I loved. wasn't intending to change it, until I rode a 2017 Roubaix Expert with Future shock.

    I expected it to be more comfortable and soak up bumps and road buzz, but wasn't expecting it to be more responsive and zippier than the SL3 S Works, despite the lower grade carbon frame.

    So took the plunge and got a good deal on a 2017 S Works from Sigma Sport in London- £7000 ( RRP £8500 )

    Even zippier and more responsive, just as comfortable as the Expert ( with the medium spring installed )

    The hype really is true- it has moved the game on significantly



    Would even make a great gravel bike ( see video ) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOkKrPGSXoY

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by carrock View Post
    Would even make a great gravel bike.
    Kinda, but the better gravel bike is the new Diverge. Futureshock, room for 42c tires and better off-road geometry compared to the more road-centric Roubaix.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chader09 View Post
    Kinda, but the better gravel bike is the new Diverge. Futureshock, room for 42c tires and better off-road geometry compared to the more road-centric Roubaix.
    Agreed, but if I arrived home with a Diverge as well as the Roubaix, the wife would ensure I'd wearing it

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by carrock View Post
    Agreed, but if I arrived home with a Diverge as well as the Roubaix, the wife would ensure I'd wearing it
    Sure.

    You can definitely toss on some wider rubber, but 32c is about the max and the shorter wheelbase will be a bit touchy in the rough.

    Still a good 80/20 road/gravel bike.

  6. #6
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    I haven't tried the new Roubaix yet, but I did try a 2018 Diverge and didn't expect much. I have a Boone that I use for CX and gravel and am quite happy with.
    Or WAS until I tried the Diverge! The Futureshock is no joke- it flat out works! I hit every sketchy bit of gravel, including deep stuff that should have knocked me off my line, hard packed dirt, etc.. and am in love with that bike- and that was a low-level model.
    I was hoping to not like it... Ordered an S-Works two days later. (Would have on the spot, but tried to convince myself I don't need it, ha ha).

    Quote Originally Posted by carrock View Post
    Agreed, but if I arrived home with a Diverge as well as the Roubaix, the wife would ensure I'd wearing it
    Every review I've read on the new Roubaix just raves about it. After trying the Diverge, I'd LOVE to have both a new Roubaix and a new Diverge, but yeah- ain't gonna happen.
    Capt Willard: "Every minute I stay in this room, I get weaker, and every minute Charlie squats in the bush, he gets stronger."

  7. #7
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    RR,
    Tough call between the new Diverge and new Roubaix. Durianrider...who is a bike wizard on the web people love to hate, says between the bikes, go Diverge for the reasons you state...more versatile in tire size, and the give up with the same rubber on the open road isn't much. That said, it depends the roads one rides and the target tire size many prefer. I live in a concrete jungle so for me, its the Roubaix but LOTS to love about the new Diverge with FS. The bike would be plenty fast with a second set of skinny tire wheels..even aero carbon wheels...for sure.

    Please come back and share your new Diverge when you get it. Doesn't get any better than the S-works. Congrats.

  8. #8
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    Hi guys,


    Iím Patrick, 45 from France.
    thanks for having me here


    I have a question regarding my upcoming bike selection. For the past 3 years, Iíve been riding a Venge S-works and been having fun with it. Obviously, going in the French alps was an uphill battle ;) and Iíve now moved a new place, quite hilly.
    I want to switch to a more versatile bike and I want to stay with Specialized as Iím loyal to my LBS and have had a good experience with them (as well as my previous Spe bikes).
    I was clearly going to buy the new Tarmac S-worksÖuntil I read this thread. I had never really considered the Roubaix as I felt it was probably not reactive enough for me, but two things have put this back as an option for me:
    1- they have now adopted the Riders first approach to the Roubaix in their 2017 line-up
    2- it looks like they have now made a very reactive bike as well according to the reviews Iíve read (although I am cautious about reviews in general)
    Iím not a racer, nor do I enter any competitions (well, very rarely to be more precise). I go out with friends a couple of times a week and we have fun together.


    My question to the riders community here:

    • given that Iím now 45, not particularly looking to race, but still looking for a very reactive bike, is the Roubaix a good option for me to consider vs the Tarmac?
    • how does the Roubaix S-works perform in the mountains? this is very important to me given where I live now.
    • and final question, what would be roughly the weight difference between the Tarmac S-works and Roubaix S-works?



    many thanks for enlightening me
    Pat

  9. #9
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    What you gotta do if dropping so much money for a new bike is go to your bikeshop in your kit...drive there in your car and ask to ride both the Roubaix and Tarmac back to back. Since you will be climbing weight matters. The Tarmac is the racier bike. The new Roubaix is a responsive bike however. But this comes down to personal choice and there is no substitute for riding each bike. The Roubaix is a BMW and the Tarmac is a Porsche. Many believe day in a BMW is easier to live with, but some will still prefer the Porsche for its feedback and more racy feel.

  10. #10
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    thanks a lot @11spd. Appreciate the input. I know I have to try them both and agree with the advice, yet if these forums exist, I guess it's fair to ask for other, more experienced people's experiences even if I'm the one ultimately riding said bike...

  11. #11
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    of course its perfectly fair. In fact, I own a Roubaix SL3 and would direct an average rider more toward a Roubaix than a Tarmac. But even some average riders will prefer the Tarmac. For one, there isn't a parallel universe for body proportion...even relative to height. I have a friend the same height as me...6'1" and he rides a bike two frame sizes smaller with super long stem because he is all torso. Our bikes look completely different. I am all legs and an endurance geometry better suits me.

    Truthfully frame geometry in my opinion even trumps and true performance differences between the bikes....which one fits you better. If you can easily touch your toes lock kneed, you likely have the flexibility to prefer the Tarmac.

    Type of roads over and above climbing matter. If you ride choppy asphalt like many do, you may prefer the future shock of the Roubaix.

    If dropping $8K USD for a new bike, I wouldn't just ride both once, I would go back and ride them both twice and even see if you could rent a demo of the one you think you prefer. Simply tell the bike shop you will buy from them...can even put a deposit down and then decide after riding.

  12. #12
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    Thanks again very helpful.
    I'm also 6'1" and ride a 58 cm frame Tarmac (before that a 58 cm Venge). My LBS tells me I'd also need a 58 cm Roubaix, not sure after reading your input though.
    He offered today test rides so I'll be sure to make a wise choice based on how I actually feel on both of them.

  13. #13
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    The Roubaix feels very responsive even compared to an S Works SL3. It will certainly be more comfortable than the Tarmac in terms of shock absorbtion. Just check that a medium spring is fitted to the Roubaix before you test ride it. My S Works was shipped with a hard spring fitted, so I swapped it out for a medium.


    Good road test video here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ssf5tenoVCE

  14. #14
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    thanks @carrock, will do

  15. #15
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    one additional question: I understand there is either a short or a tall stack headset cover.
    Which one are you guys using? I'm 6'1"...

  16. #16
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    Unanswerable because it depends on your leg lengthÖshort or long for your height of 6í1Ē AND how flexible you areÖ.AND how racy you prefer to ride.
    Stack is complicated without a history of riding.
    In general a weaker rider will tend to prefer more stack and a more fit rider will prefer less stack.
    But this preference is blurred by above and even colored by personal preference including what you use the bike forÖlong rides versus shorter, more aggressive rides.


  17. #17
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    thanks @11spd, makes perfect sense. Does the shorter stack bring the rider closer to a Tarmac position though?

  18. #18
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    Yes, and can even create overlap fit between the Roubaix and Tarmac with the short stack FS headset for the Roubaix.
    So you need to extrapolate a bit from your riding experience. If you are a strong rider who participates in fast A group rides and you arenít all legs, then you may want to go right to the short stack.
    If you are more of a beginning rider and not particularly flexible, you likely would prefer the taller stack fit. Fit is a work in progress. Many start out riding more upright and then move lower as they progress and become for flexible. Riding more aggressively tends to promote desire for a flatter back for not only glute enlistment but aerodynamics.


  19. #19
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    crystal clear, thanks much!

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