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  1. #1
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    €@&#! my rubber cement dried up

    must've been two years since i last flatted. happened today at the far end of my ride. and i found the rubber cement in my patch kit had dried up! i ripped the little cement tube open and tried to use the dried cement to bond the patch. don't do that. doesn't work. i just wasted precious co2 finding out. so i hoofed it to the hardware store and bought some cement. patched the tube. yay! but ran out of co2. boo! hoofed it to the bike shop (which, by now, i'm almost back home) and properly inflated the tire.

    man, that sucked.

    check yer patch kit, foo!
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  2. #2
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    Sorry for your pain, but that was a great story!

  3. #3
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    Spare tube and glueless patches, maybe a pump.

    They're temporary but I've used the glueless patches for a flat and left it there till the tire was wore out.
    Too old to ride plastic

  4. #4
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    I carry a patch kit as a backup in the unlikely event that I have such a bad day that I run out of spare tubes.

    I also carry a Topeak Mini Morph pump. They don't run out or air and the weight won't slow you down - really!
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  5. #5
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    carry two tubes, three CO2 cartridges, and a couple of glue-less patches...have never had to patch a tube on the road.
    Ancient Astronaut theorists say, 'YES!'

  6. #6
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    The little tubes of glue are pathetic. I carry the adhesive patches for emergency use and have used duct tape before in desperation. I have decreased the amount of CO2 I carry and use a nice mini hand pump almost exclusively now.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Spare tube and glueless patches, maybe a pump.

    They're temporary but I've used the glueless patches for a flat and left it there till the tire was wore out.
    Maybe a pump?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mfdemicco View Post
    Maybe a pump?
    Many have an aversion to pumps, hence my mild suggestion. But I will say if pumping up the tires is going to rest solely on co2 it would be wise to carry at least 3 or 4 of them, but then that defeats the whole idea of them.
    Too old to ride plastic

  9. #9
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    I buy a big tube of Slime glue at Wal-Mart. Cheap and takes long to dry out. Bulk patches of 100 Remas too.


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  10. #10
    tlg
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    And the moral of the story.... carry a spare tube (and glueless patches). It's much easier to patch your tubes at home rather the side of the road.
    Carrying a 100g tube is much better than hoofing it to the hardware store and bike shop.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  11. #11
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    I'm surprised to read that blackfrancois was so ill prepared having seen pictures of the large Carradice saddle bag he has posted he uses.
    Too old to ride plastic

  12. #12
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    I'm surprised to read that blackfrancois was so ill prepared having seen pictures of the large Carradice saddle bag he has posted he uses.
    You could fit a dozen tubes in that thing.

    The ultimate saddle bag
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Spare tube and glueless patches, maybe a pump.
    This. I've never understood the idea of depending on a patch kit at the side of the road. What if you're caught in the rain? What if your glue has dried out. Makes no sense.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    This. I've never understood the idea of depending on a patch kit at the side of the road. What if you're caught in the rain? What if your glue has dried out. Makes no sense.
    Plus you should not ride on a newly patched tube (according to Jobst Brandt).

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Many have an aversion to pumps, hence my mild suggestion. But I will say if pumping up the tires is going to rest solely on co2 it would be wise to carry at least 3 or 4 of them, but then that defeats the whole idea of them.
    'defeats' them how...? not sure I'm following...

    would rather carry multiple cartridges than resort to stroking some crappy mini-pump a couple hundred times on a scorching hot summer day...btdt, it sucks pretty hard.

    simply cracking the valve on a CO2 rig is pretty effortless. makes the whole process of flatting much less of a pita.
    Ancient Astronaut theorists say, 'YES!'

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oxtox View Post
    'defeats' them how...? not sure I'm following...

    would rather carry multiple cartridges than resort to stroking some crappy mini-pump a couple hundred times on a scorching hot summer day...btdt, it sucks pretty hard.

    simply cracking the valve on a CO2 rig is pretty effortless. makes the whole process of flatting much less of a pita.
    I say it "defeats" them because many carry one, maybe two, of them to be minimalists. 3 or 4 ceases to be minimal.

    I carry a pump or co2 or sometimes both, depending on what's on the bike or how long of I ride I'm planning on. To tell the truth, I don't care how I air up my tires, as long as the flat is repaired and I can be on my merry way.

    The draw back of co2, in my eyes, is bleeding it off and pumping the tires up with air before the next ride.
    Too old to ride plastic

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    I say it "defeats" them because many carry one, maybe two, of them to be minimalists. 3 or 4 ceases to be minimal.

    I carry a pump or co2 or sometimes both, depending on what's on the bike or how long of I ride I'm planning on. To tell the truth, I don't care how I air up my tires, as long as the flat is repaired and I can be on my merry way.

    The draw back of co2, in my eyes, is bleeding it off and pumping the tires up with air before the next ride.
    They are also somewhat hazardous in that the freezing cold can burn the skin and if your inflator malfunctions, you can't simply unscrew the full but punctured cartridge cause it will take off like a rocket. Happened to me with an Innovations pump that's also a CO2 inflator. I screwed in the cartridge and nothing came out. I had to unscrew the pump from the cartridge with my foot on it and it took off like a rocket. Good thing I pointed it away from people. Upon later review there was an o-ring missing from my pump where the cartridge seats.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    I say it "defeats" them because many carry one, maybe two, of them to be minimalists. 3 or 4 ceases to be minimal.

    I carry a pump or co2 or sometimes both, depending on what's on the bike or how long of I ride I'm planning on. To tell the truth, I don't care how I air up my tires, as long as the flat is repaired and I can be on my merry way.

    The draw back of co2, in my eyes, is bleeding it off and pumping the tires up with air before the next ride.
    carrying a single cart isn't very prudent. pretty sure I can get home with three tho...covers a misfire and two flats.

    dumping the CO2 and airing up at home with a floor pump is a big meh for me...
    Ancient Astronaut theorists say, 'YES!'

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    You could fit a dozen tubes in that thing.

    The ultimate saddle bag

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mfdemicco View Post
    Plus you should not ride on a newly patched tube (according to Jobst Brandt).
    Not sure where that comes from. You let the glue fully dry before applying the patch (another reason not to use a patch kit at the side of the road) and that is as good as the adhesion is going to get.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Not sure where that comes from. You let the glue fully dry before applying the patch (another reason not to use a patch kit at the side of the road) and that is as good as the adhesion is going to get.
    Don't know. He said it continues to dry (even though it looks dry) and that it's easy to pull off a patch that you just stuck down and it's almost impossible to pull off a patch thats been stuck down for a couple of days thus proving his point. Whenever I patch I don't put the same tube back in the tire and save it for another time.

  22. #22
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Not sure where that comes from. You let the glue fully dry before applying the patch (another reason not to use a patch kit at the side of the road) and that is as good as the adhesion is going to get.
    I guess this is what he's referring to.
    I think it depends on the type of patch and glue used. With vulcanizing glue and a Rema patch, after a minute or so, that b!tch isn't coming off.


    Patching Tubes by Jobst Brandt
    To test how fast patches cure, a patch can be pulled off easily shortly after application, while it is practically impossible after a day or so. For reliable patches, the freshly patched tube should be put in reserve, while a reserve tube is installed. This allows a new patch more time to cure before being put into service.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    I'm surprised to read that blackfrancois was so ill prepared having seen pictures of the large Carradice saddle bag he has posted he uses.
    i don't know why you would think bag size has anything to do with flat preparedness.

    as i wrote, i haven't had a flat in two years. so i hadn't checked my patch kit. i didn't know cement could dry out in its container.

    but it's all good. i added a new co2, new tube of cement, and a couple new patches in my road kit.

    and yeah, i still have plenty of room in my bag for some sweet components i might buy at the shop or a couple subs from the vietnamese deli.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    but it's all good. i added a new co2, new tube of cement, and a couple new patches in my road kit.

    and yeah, i still have plenty of room in my bag ........
    For a spare tube maybe?
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    For a spare tube maybe?
    Good idea.
    Too old to ride plastic

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