Results 1 to 24 of 24
  1. #1
    Stay Fit!
    Reputation: eyezlee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    185

    200-210 pounds and $500-$800 to spend

    Looking for suggestions for a wheel set, I'm 6'2" and 200-210 depending on the season.

    2009 Trek Madone 5.2 has the Bontrager Race X-Lite with paired spokes.

    I'm looking for a daily driver / all arounder wheelset thats better and lighter if possible.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    40
    Hi,
    I will look into having a hand-built wheelset,( not that there are anything wrong with factory built wheels)
    My reasons:
    1. you can have hand-built wheelset for less than US$500 that are both strong and light
    2. If it is build by a good builder, you will have a long lasting wheelset (you might need to true them once in a while depending on how you ride)
    3. You can customized your wheelset (free to choose the hubs, spokes, rims based on your preference and budget)
    4. Easier to get parts (if you break a spokes (touch wood), you can usually get a replacement spokes from any bike shops)

    For your weight, I will look at 32h front and rear wheel with a 3 cross lacing pattern. Even 28h wheels are Ok.

    All the best
    Howard

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    40
    Have a look at these 2 online wheelbuilding shops (I have no affiliation with them):
    http://www.wheelbuilder.com/
    http://www.prowheelbuilder.com/
    I know there are other good wheel builders like Mike Garcia and others (sorry I cannot remember their name or website address)

    Try emailing them, let them know your weight, budget, riding style and I believe they will give you build suggestions/options that you can consider.

    You can also build wheels yourself if you feel that you want to take up the challenge (i build my own wheels)

    Cheers,
    Howard

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    5,445
    I would agree with Howard. I am in the 200# range and have a set of Rolf Prima Elans. I had the rear rebuilt with a rough service rim when I pulled 2 spokes out he the original rim (the rim was 6 years old at the time). The Rolfs are way better than the Race-X-Lites I used to have. When the Rolf was down for service I bought a closeout pair of Easton EA 90 SLs. Nice. but I popped a spoke after 14 months. It surprised me as I rode the Rolf's with 24 spokes on the rear with no issues for several years. I thought the 28 spokes of the Eastons would have made them bomb proof.

    Assuming you go with some semi aero rims, 28 spokes should be plenty for the rear. 24 for the front.

    A friend got a set from WheelBuilder.Com and is very happy with them. (He goes about 235#)
    Last edited by Blue CheeseHead; 08-16-2010 at 11:10 AM.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    107
    These get great reviews and the price is on your lower end..

    http://www.rolwheels.com/rol_race_sl_wheels.php

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    876
    It is hard to get a durable daily driver/all-around wheelset for a 210 lb rider that is also very light. There are always tradeoffs. I would say the ideal set is something like chanhoward mentioned above with 32 spokes/wheel. With something like a DT Swiss RR465 rim it will not be the lightest set around, but it will be very durable. You can go with Sapim Laser spokes on the front and rear non-drive side to save some weight.

    Another option is a 24/28 or 28/32 30mm Kinlin XR-300 wheelset with Sapim CX-Ray or Laser spokes, but I still think the first option is the ideal choice.

    Dura-Ace or White Industries hubs are two good options. Ultegra is less expensive, very durable, but heavier.
    Valley Cyclist Wheels www.valleycyclist.com

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: CaliforniaPI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    148

    Dura Ace 7900/Open Pro

    Performance has the dura-ace 7900 hub with the open pro 32 spoke on sale at present. $269 rear, $179 front. Can't beat that for bomb-proof wheels with great hubs that should last a very long time. The Dura Ace has the click to adjust hubs, which mean when its time to regrease the hub, there is no tools needed to get perfect adjustment. In my opinion, the hub cone tightness/looseness is the most difficult adjustment on a bike to get spot on. FYI, I have ordered these for myself and they should be here this week. Don't forget 10% back on purchases if you get the membership. If you go on Tuesday lunchtime or during one of their special days, its 20% back.
    810 Grams front
    940 Grams rear
    Last edited by CaliforniaPI; 08-16-2010 at 07:52 AM.

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: terbennett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,032
    Quote Originally Posted by chanhoward
    Have a look at these 2 online wheelbuilding shops (I have no affiliation with them):
    http://www.wheelbuilder.com/
    http://www.prowheelbuilder.com/
    I know there are other good wheel builders like Mike Garcia and others (sorry I cannot remember their name or website address)

    Try emailing them, let them know your weight, budget, riding style and I believe they will give you build suggestions/options that you can consider.

    You can also build wheels yourself if you feel that you want to take up the challenge (i build my own wheels)

    Cheers,
    Howard
    I also agree with Howard. I used Wheelbuilder.com to build me a pair of Velocity Deep V wheels w/ Ultegra hubs. They are located in El Monte, California and Richard is a great guy to work with. Since I only live about 20-25 minutes from there, I visited them. Heck, any of the ones Howard recommended sahould give you great service, but since I had such a great experience with Wheelbuilder.com, I'm biased

  9. #9
    Stay Fit!
    Reputation: eyezlee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    185
    Quote Originally Posted by 1nf0s3c
    These get great reviews and the price is on your lower end..

    http://www.rolwheels.com/rol_race_sl_wheels.php
    Liking these ROL wheels. Look great and have awesome reviews. Any negative feedback?

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    396
    Quote Originally Posted by eyezlee
    Liking these ROL wheels. Look great and have awesome reviews. Any negative feedback?
    For you, I'd get the ROL Volant. All I've heard were positive on these wheels.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: gearguywb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    283
    I am in the same weight range and switched about 18 months ago from Ksyriums to a set of handbuilts with DT 240 hubs and DT 1.1 rims. Also switched to 25mm Vittorias. Life has been really good since.
    Well trained....well rested......pick one!

  12. #12
    Engineer
    Reputation: blr33439's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    46
    I am not sure how light of wheels you are looking for, but these here are 1580g and good for riders up to 300lbs. I weigh 220lbs and they don't flex at all. They were deliberately overbuilt and I have zero complaints.

    http://www.rppbike.com/wpimages/wpe4bb9a12_05.jpg

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    876
    As I mentioned In another thread, how did they determine the weight limit? 300lbs seems like a pretty high maximum weight for those wheels, based on what they look like in the pictures,
    Valley Cyclist Wheels www.valleycyclist.com

  14. #14
    Engineer
    Reputation: blr33439's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    46
    I answered in the other thread, hopefully to your satisfaction. If not, you can always buy a set and carry weights up to 300lbs to challenge me. I welcome the challenge.

  15. #15
    Online Wheel Builder
    Reputation: Zen Cyclery's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    3,162
    I think that Valley got this one right on the head. However, the one things I would advise is to go with an Alchemy ELF up front and a White Industries H3 in the rear. You could shave a bit of weight there and also get a nice wide flange spacing. At your weight i the flange spacing really makes a difference. Lace these up to an XR270/XR300 combination, at 24/28 and you would have yourself a solid wheelset. Probably looking at right around 1450 ish for the set, which would be a bit lighter than your current set.

  16. #16
    Get me to In&Out
    Reputation: spookyload's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,550
    Performance also has Cosmic Carbone on sale for $849. Drop the 10% coupon they have right now and you have a $750 wheelset that will handle your weight and are damn fast and reliable. You also wont have to wait for a custom wheel builder to get around to making them. You will have others say that you can't repair a mavic wheel, but in ten years of riding Mavic wheels on both mountain and road, I have never needed that option.
    Cyclists really need to learn a little Rule #5.

  17. #17
    Online Wheel Builder
    Reputation: Zen Cyclery's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    3,162
    Quote Originally Posted by spookyload
    You also wont have to wait for a custom wheel builder to get around to making them. You will have others say that you can't repair a mavic wheel, but in ten years of riding Mavic wheels on both mountain and road, I have never needed that option.
    I am only speaking for us but we definitely have faster turnaround time for replacement parts than Mavic. Back in the day (when I used to ride Mavic), I broke a spoke and Mavic took two and a half weeks to even ship one out. You break a spoke on a custom build, have one shipped same day.

  18. #18
    Engineer
    Reputation: blr33439's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    46
    I see the angle. You sell similar wheels. Ok, what weight do you put on your xr270s?

  19. #19
    Online Wheel Builder
    Reputation: Zen Cyclery's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    3,162
    Quote Originally Posted by blr33439
    I see the angle. You sell similar wheels. Ok, what weight do you put on your xr270s?
    Well, it really depends. I think that you could get away with doing a 28h Xr270 in the rear, but having a bit of reassurance is never a bad thing. If the OP was 170 lbs, I would do 270s front and rear. But that doesn't seem to be the case. Adding those extra 25 grams is only going to make for a more durable wheelset, and some peace of mind.

  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    876
    Quote Originally Posted by blr33439
    I see the angle. You sell similar wheels. Ok, what weight do you put on your xr270s?
    I'm usually conservative, but a 200 lb rider should be fine with 20/24 spokes. It also depends on riding style etc.

    They can probably handle 300lbs, but they will most likely start to have problems earlier than with lighter riders.
    Valley Cyclist Wheels www.valleycyclist.com

  21. #21
    Get me to In&Out
    Reputation: spookyload's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,550
    Quote Originally Posted by Zen Cyclery
    I am only speaking for us but we definitely have faster turnaround time for replacement parts than Mavic. Back in the day (when I used to ride Mavic), I broke a spoke and Mavic took two and a half weeks to even ship one out. You break a spoke on a custom build, have one shipped same day.
    Like I said, in the decade of riding Mavic wheels at around 4000 miles per year on road/mountain, I have never had a spoke break or rim crack. If you needed the repair, it would indeed take time, but Mavic wheels have been reliable. Can you make a wheel as strong AND as aero as the Cosmic Carbone for $750? That is with bladed stainless spokes and a damn strong 52mm aero rim.
    Cyclists really need to learn a little Rule #5.

  22. #22
    Online Wheel Builder
    Reputation: Zen Cyclery's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    3,162
    [QUOTE=spookyload] Can you make a wheel as strong AND as aero as the Cosmic Carbone for $750? That is with bladed stainless spokes and a damn strong 52mm aero rim.[/QUOTE


    Ohh boy. You forgot a major piece of the puzzle! Last time I checked, weight had some sort of effect on riding a bicycle? Right? Correct me if I'm wrong, but the Cosmic Carbone comes in at grotesque 1740 grams. But thats the model that goes for $1199, so the pig your talking about is probably a bit heavier. Anywho, I'm willing to bet my family jewels that a 30mm deep rim (although less aero) would be faster than the Carbones. Remember, there is three elements to look for when analyzing wheels: price, durability AND weight.

  23. #23
    Engineer
    Reputation: blr33439's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    46
    Cosmic carbones use carbon and aluminum to allow for more reliable braking(regular brake pads). That is the primary reason for the higher weight. Also, a main advantage of carbon wheels is weight savings, which is only completely realized with the tubular design. I would tend to agree with zen cyclery that 30mm deep aluminum rims would work better. American classic 420s are pretty nice if you want a little deeper profile.

  24. #24
    Get me to In&Out
    Reputation: spookyload's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,550
    [quote=Zen Cyclery]
    Quote Originally Posted by spookyload
    Can you make a wheel as strong AND as aero as the Cosmic Carbone for $750? That is with bladed stainless spokes and a damn strong 52mm aero rim.[/QUOTE


    Ohh boy. You forgot a major piece of the puzzle! Last time I checked, weight had some sort of effect on riding a bicycle? Right? Correct me if I'm wrong, but the Cosmic Carbone comes in at grotesque 1740 grams. But thats the model that goes for $1199, so the pig your talking about is probably a bit heavier. Anywho, I'm willing to bet my family jewels that a 30mm deep rim (although less aero) would be faster than the Carbones. Remember, there is three elements to look for when analyzing wheels: price, durability AND weight.
    So when does weight become an issue in cycling? It is most critical in accelerations and climbing. How often does someone accelerate when out training by themselves? Again, these are daily wheels he is after, so these aren't racing wheels where a lighter wheel would benefit in cornering or jumps. Once the energy is spent getting the heavier wheels up to speed, they have zero penalty for being heavier when compared to the aero benefit they will give. Over 70% of energy spent cycling is used to overcome aero drag, not acceleratioin. Even more so when they are riding in flats is aero a greater advantage over weight. So a 30mm rim is the answer? Definately not. If the sweet spot for aero was that shallow, you wouldn't see folks in time trials on deep rims. Granted we all don't want to ride 80mm rims on a daily basis due to things like crosswinds, but a 52mm rim will not suffer in crosswinds and still give a huge advantage over 30mm rims. Custom wheel builders shudder at this topic because there are very few deep rims they can build from. It is where their "advantage" goes away. The Cosmic isn't the greatest wheel made by any choice. I was simply stating that for what the OP is looking for, this would be a great wheel choice based on his riding needs, body weight, and budget. The Cosmic at $1100 isn't a fit for him, but at less than $800 it is a great choice.
    Cyclists really need to learn a little Rule #5.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Sea Otter Classic

Hot Deals

Contest


Latest RoadBike Articles


Latest Videos

RoadbikeReview on Facebook