Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 28
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: boleiro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    253

    2018 Carbon Clinchers... Safe Enough for Decents?

    What is the latest on Carbon Clincher wheels for descents? I have done a lot of searching but can't very much at all that is recent. Lots of info on how well they climb... but, was hoping to hear experiences of forum members with their carbon clinchers and coming down the mountain.

    To help, the rides would up the Salt Lake City Utah canyons that can get steep, but not too technical. The real worry for me is traffic... technical or not, sometimes with cars on the road you have to brake fast and hard. I understand how to properly modulate braking and to not drag the pads. But, there are those times you have to ride the brakes some dealing with cars and other riders. I fear this! Maybe specific brands and brake pads would be best?

    I really want to get some carbon wheels for the wrong and right reasons. But feel I would be better served with a solid pair of aluminum clinchers due to the amount climbing I do... thinking campy eurus or shamal c17.

    any words of wisdom to guide this purchase?
    "When everybody thinks alike, nobody is thinking."

  2. #2
    wheelbuilder
    Reputation: ergott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    2,205
    You can still kill a rim in the worst conditions. That means dragging brakes for a real long time. If you feel conditions might dictate that, I'd consider aluminium. Just gives you added peace of mind. On closed roads with some basic braking skill I think it's a non issue.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    13,026
    Quote Originally Posted by boleiro View Post

    any words of wisdom to guide this purchase?
    Get a bike w/ disc brakes and carbon wheels.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Notvintage's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    1,170
    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Get a bike w/ disc brakes and carbon wheels.
    Carbon clinchers are a total waste of money and I even have a pair of 2017 Zipp 202s. OP; be smart and get the C17 Campy Shamals; one of the best factory wheelsets made.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: boleiro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    253
    ...I guess I knew I really knew I should go aluminum! I wish replacing my frame and wheelset for disc was an option... But that at least doubles a $1500iish investment!

    Thanks for all the answers!
    "When everybody thinks alike, nobody is thinking."

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    7,298
    IMO, I don't think carbon wheels are worth the $$$ unless you are getting paid to race. And if that's the case, you are probably having your wheels given to you for free.

    There are many good quality aluminum options in the 1600g range for a set. If you really want to reduce rotating weight more, get lighter tires. Of course, that comes with its own set of drawbacks like less puncture resistance.

    Sorry, but there are no free lunches.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    8,585
    I don't know about resistance to getting fried or blowing tubes from heat but the braking performance of Corima rims is pretty amazing. Better than my alloy rims for sure.

    Note though I tested the tubular (but pretty sure surface on clinchers is the same) and it wasn't raining.

  8. #8
    pmf
    pmf is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    4,837
    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Get a bike w/ disc brakes and carbon wheels.
    This is the only reasonable way I can see running carbon clinchers in a hilly area. November Dave had a post here sometime ago about why his business quit selling carbon clinchers. I don't understand why they're so popular. Yeah, they look cool, but that's about it.

  9. #9
    ngl
    ngl is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    643
    I guess I'll be the first to go against the norm. I now run 38 mm carbon clinchers (1400 grams) along with premium tires and latex tubes. I love them. The ride is amazing (especially when riding long distances), they are lighter for climbing & for quick accelerations when the pack changes speed and they are a little more aero. Are they a vast improvement over aluminum...NOPE. Would I use them for extended descents...NOPE. Are there people commenting on carbon clinchers without having ever ridden them...YEP.

  10. #10
    wheelbuilder
    Reputation: ergott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    2,205
    Be aware that most carbon clincher manufacturers do not recommend latex tubes as they can fail sooner than butyl. Many of them have warning labels right on the rim.

  11. #11
    ngl
    ngl is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    643
    I have read many posts/reports/comments/gossip on this topic. Reasons being heat build-up, carbon shards, corrosion, improper installation. The reasons go on and on.

    For argument sake let's say "latex tubes can fail sooner than butyl" when used with carbon clinchers. I have had many flats (for all sorts of different reasons) over the years using both Butyl and Latex tubes together with aluminum rims and carbon rims. I think it's a 'given' that you are going to flat if you ride a bike. My next flat may be because of a latex failure or one of any number of other reasons.

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,875
    for mountains, I use only aluminum clinchers.

    But for flatlanders, I think carbon clinchers make a lot of sense. These folks have no real need for braking.

    having said that, all my wheelsets are either shallow aluminum clinchers or 50mm-55mm carbon tubulars. I use my carbon aero tubs on the flat and I absolutely love it and will not consider going to anything else. Yes, I carry a 21mm wide spare tub in my back pocket that folks up quite nicely! Only have to use the spare 2 times over the last 2 years or so, well worth the hassle of tubs in my case.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    765
    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    for mountains, I use only aluminum clinchers.

    But for flatlanders, I think carbon clinchers make a lot of sense. These folks have no real need for braking.

    having said that, all my wheelsets are either shallow aluminum clinchers or 50mm-55mm carbon tubulars. I use my carbon aero tubs on the flat and I absolutely love it and will not consider going to anything else. Yes, I carry a 21mm wide spare tub in my back pocket that folks up quite nicely! Only have to use the spare 2 times over the last 2 years or so, well worth the hassle of tubs in my case.

    LOL, aclinjury! This is not the spelling/grammar thing, I just love the name. You need to patent/register it. FOLKS UP when you see a tubby rider carrying a tubby. Hey, look there, FOLKS UP!!


    Seriously, this whole thread has me confused. You guys are well aware of the short, sharp bergs that exist in Belgium/Netherlands, and you can hit speeds of 50+mph coming down out off of them, but also, there's literally thousands of them, and constant braking & turning onto new roads/paths. It's just how the region is laid out.

    Short of it being one of the too windy days we see here, which can come in bunches and so a lot of guys flop on aluminum front rims (at a minimum), are you all saying that these people riding carbon clinchers, most 40-60mm, are playing with their lives? Even when you see randos from Girona up through the Alps, these people are on the lightest carbon wheels, usually carbon clinchers, they can ride.

    Is there some kind of bias going on in this thread? Dang, I was thinking of finally getting pair of Boyd's 44mm carbons this summer, but now I am not so sure. The wheels would be great for the kermesses I race, but I also thought I could train on them, constantly, and not worry about the terrain, braking, etc. And, yes, my bikes are NOT disc bikes---not heading there if I can help, because, for one, it'd be too expensive given my still great stable of clincher bikes. Anyhow, reading this thread, maybe I should just stick to aluminum.

    Can someone post a link to November Dave's thread (that the person mentioned earlier in this thread) why his outfit stopped selling carbon clinchers?? Thank you much.


    [Edit: tried to correct spelling errors]
    Last edited by BelgianHammer; 04-28-2018 at 12:19 AM.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    8,585
    Quote Originally Posted by ngl View Post
    I have read many posts/reports/comments/gossip on this topic. Reasons being heat build-up, carbon shards, corrosion, improper installation. The reasons go on and on.

    For argument sake let's say "latex tubes can fail sooner than butyl" when used with carbon clinchers. I have had many flats (for all sorts of different reasons) over the years using both Butyl and Latex tubes together with aluminum rims and carbon rims. I think it's a 'given' that you are going to flat if you ride a bike. My next flat may be because of a latex failure or one of any number of other reasons.
    Well you are the one that said you wouldn't use your carbon rims on long extended descents and that's what this OP is asking about.
    I get that you were talking about not using deep rims not latex when you said that but it would be another reason. I get your point and think it applies to just riding around. But if latex pops from heat of carbon then a few more flats then is indeed a big deal because they will happen on long steep descents.

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,425
    I have carbon clinchers (boyd 44) and i ride them with latex tubes. On climbing days/long fast descent days, i run an alloy front wheel. Don't know that it is necessary and don't want to find out it is. And the alloy wheel brakes much better tham the carbon wheel.

    I'll ride the carbon wheels on pure skyline drive rides (5-6% mostly) - because you don't need to brake much if at all for any of that road. But, i prefer the alloy front for the times you have to brake to make turns or stop right at the bottom of a 50 mph descent that butts into a divided highway (mt weather).

    With all that, i want a disc brake road bike. Roadies gave me crap in 1998 for running a threadless fork on my road bike. We know how that ended up. Disc brakes will be the same story.

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    7,298
    Quote Originally Posted by ngl View Post
    I have read many posts/reports/comments/gossip on this topic. Reasons being heat build-up, carbon shards, corrosion, improper installation. The reasons go on and on.
    Corrosion? I didn't know carbon corrodes. Do tell!
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  17. #17
    ngl
    ngl is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    643
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Well you are the one that said you wouldn't use your carbon rims on long extended descents and that's what this OP is asking about.
    I get that you were talking about not using deep rims not latex when you said that but it would be another reason. I get your point and think it applies to just riding around. But if latex pops from heat of carbon then a few more flats then is indeed a big deal because they will happen on long steep descents.
    You are right Jay (and some of my post may have been ambiguous). Personally, I would not use or recommend using carbon clinchers on extended high speed & technical descents where a lot of braking is involved, or dragging the brakes is involved. I have many reasons and the POSSIBILITY of blowing a latex tube is only one of them. Also after riding many 1000's of miles with latex tubes, I still have never blown a latex tube due to overheating YET.

  18. #18
    Old and in the way.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    150
    Quote Originally Posted by ergott View Post
    Be aware that most carbon clincher manufacturers do not recommend latex tubes as they can fail sooner than butyl. Many of them have warning labels right on the rim.
    I ran latex for a summer, and moved on. They didn't fail but there was little, if any benefit and they are high maintenance since they lose air very quickly. Not worth it.

  19. #19
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    2,426
    Quote Originally Posted by dmanthree View Post
    I ran latex for a summer, and moved on. They didn't fail but there was little, if any benefit and they are high maintenance since they lose air very quickly. Not worth it.
    Is it that much effort to pump up the tires before a ride? I did that even back when I used butyl tubes.

  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Srode's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,905
    Quote Originally Posted by dmanthree View Post
    I ran latex for a summer, and moved on. They didn't fail but there was little, if any benefit and they are high maintenance since they lose air very quickly. Not worth it.
    I use them, just pump them up every ride like I do with any tube, no biggie. They do ride nicer, and even if they gain only a couple watts, I'll take what I can get! Plus they do ride nicer are supposed to be more resistant to punctures.
    Moderation is boring - do epic s##t

    Trek Domane
    Niner RLT9 (Gravel Bike)
    Trek Crockett

  21. #21
    gazing from the shadows
    Reputation: QuiQuaeQuod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    25,438
    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    Is it that much effort to pump up the tires before a ride? I did that even back when I used butyl tubes.
    Much effort? No. But more. I ride with my wife, and so I deal with 4 tires at a time. I generally pump them once a week, unless I have reason for a specific pressure in our acceptable range.

    Even for topping off, a couple psi versus a couple tens of psi for every ride. Times 4. Big deal? No, small deal, but every single time. And easily eliminated using butyl.

    YMMV but I like grab and go for my road bike.
    .
    Stout beers under trees, please.

  22. #22
    Old and in the way.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    150
    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    Is it that much effort to pump up the tires before a ride? I did that even back when I used butyl tubes.
    No, but they'd lose air during long rides, as well. I lost ten PSI during a long ride once. They'd lose 15 to 20 PSI overnight.

  23. #23
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    8,585
    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    I use them, just pump them up every ride like I do with any tube, no biggie. They do ride nicer, and even if they gain only a couple watts, I'll take what I can get! Plus they do ride nicer are supposed to be more resistant to punctures.
    I use them on my road bike and think they help too. Both speed and comfort wise. If I remember correctly it's about 6 watts, or three per tire, according to reputable testing. Not a ton but I'll take it.

    I don't use them on my cross bike and use that bike for quick lunch rides ect when I don't feel like going though the whole production of pumping tires for just a quick or utilitarian ride (like to run an errand by bike).

  24. #24
    pmf
    pmf is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    4,837
    Quote Originally Posted by dmanthree View Post
    I ran latex for a summer, and moved on. They didn't fail but there was little, if any benefit and they are high maintenance since they lose air very quickly. Not worth it.
    That was precisely my conclusion. I'm not a person who claims to tell the difference between 2.5 mm on cranks, or the material that a seat post is made of, so maybe there are those who really notice a better ride from latex tubes, but I sure didn't

    And yes, it is a PITA to have to pump your tires before EVERY ride because of the latex tubes that make no perceived difference. I commute and leave my bike in the car (I drive to a MUT) for a few days in a row. So yeah, I prefer not to have to go out into the garage every night before bed, pull the bike out of the car and pump up the tires. With butyl tubes, you lose maybe 2-3 lbs a day. With latex its more like 15-20 lbs.

  25. #25
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: terbennett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,341
    Your options are either disc or a carbon wheel with an aluminum braking surface like HED and most Mavic wheels (to name a couple). These are generally aluminum box wheels with a carbon fairing, but they work just as well and are more practical. My take is since most people are buying them more for the aesthetics than anything else and the perceived increase in speed they think they will achieve from them, it's worth looking into. Also, carbon clinchers have been proven to be more aero than their tubular counterparts. the big brands are costly, but they havea lot of R&D behind them. If you can't or don't want to swing for the big bucks they cost, consider a Chinese carbon brand that is UCI-approved, like Yeoleo. I'm pretty sure the UCI isn't going to risk putting their approval on crap products. Then again, you can stick with aluminum, not have to worry and be done with it.
    Last edited by terbennett; 05-01-2018 at 08:01 AM.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. RBR TdF 2018 Predictions! Post by Start Time 2018
    By PJay in forum Pro Cycling - Tour de France
    Replies: 51
    Last Post: 2 Weeks Ago, 07:45 AM
  2. Brake Pad Recommendations? Brakes Squeal on Decents
    By bowbafet in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 04-13-2014, 12:02 PM
  3. Faster on climbs, but slower on flats/decents
    By joeblack in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 06-22-2013, 10:28 AM
  4. Replies: 16
    Last Post: 09-06-2012, 12:13 PM
  5. Trouble with Tiagra brakes on steep decents
    By DCD 2005 in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-02-2011, 10:45 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

roadbikereview.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.