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  1. #1
    Cpark
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    24H Straight Pull DT Swiss Rear Disc Wheel Durability

    I just picked up a 2018 BMC Teammachine SLR02 Disc, and it came with a set 24/24 wheels - 23mm tall aluminum rims with Aero Comp spokes 2X on CLD DT370 hubs.
    Considering that it’s disc wheels, I was surprised to see this set up on a mass produced stock bike.
    Is this a case of either front wheel is over built or rear one is under built?
    I would’ve been more comfortable with 24/28 set up, as I’m not a small rider at 6’/185lbs.

    Any thoughts?
    Last edited by cpark; 02-01-2018 at 06:55 AM.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    The rear hub is the wider mtb 142 standard and the spoke tension balance is quite good, partially due to the disk mount. The 24/24 build is totally reasonable, even if more spokes is better than fewer.

    Good wheels.

  3. #3
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    Nevermind the disc brake part of the equation. 24 rear at 185 pounds is iffy under any circumstances. Not to say you would definitely have problems, but you'd have nothing to gain by 'getting away with 24' so why bother.

  4. #4
    Cpark
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    Thank for the feedback, gentlemen.
    I swapped them out with a set of Nox wheels (24/28 spokes on WI CLD hubs).
    The only 24H rear wheels I ever had are the Enve 2.2, 3.4 and 4.5 wheels laced on stiff Alchemy hubs, and they all rubbed brakes when I rode out of the saddle.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 24H Straight Pull DT Swiss Rear Disc Wheel Durability-img_0083-copy.jpg  

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by cpark View Post
    Thank for the feedback, gentlemen.
    I swapped them out with a set of Nox wheels (24/28 spokes on WI CLD hubs).
    The only 24H rear wheels I ever had are the Enve 2.2, 3.4 and 4.5 wheels laced on stiff Alchemy hubs, and they all rubbed brakes when I rode out of the saddle.
    The weird thing with those enve wheels is because the rim is so stiff the whole rim moves relative to the hub. With shallower alloy wheels the rim flexes with the load at the contact patch and the rim near the brakes stays relatively undisturbed. More flex might be happening, but it's harder to perceive out on the road.

    Beautiful bike!!

  6. #6
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    I will say that I think 24 spokes for disc wheels is too low unless you are a feather light rider. I would opt for at least 28 and preferably 32 on both wheels. You won't notice any weight or aero difference - really!

    That being said, on disc wheels, spoke tension disparity on your rear wheel is less of an issue. My point here is that on a disc wheel set, there is no practical reason to run less spokes on the front. You need to dish your front wheel as well as your rear. And there is more stress on your hubs and spokes while braking.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  7. #7
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    All of industry nine's road disc wheels are 24 spoke, so at least they think it's enough (but those are also triplet laced). I weigh around 155 and have been riding a set of 24/24 disc brake spokes for a couple of years (Pacenti SL25/BHS hubs, Sapim Laser spokes) with no issues

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    I will say that I think 24 spokes for disc wheels is too low unless you are a feather light rider. I would opt for at least 28 and preferably 32 on both wheels. You won't notice any weight or aero difference - really!

    That being said, on disc wheels, spoke tension disparity on your rear wheel is less of an issue. My point here is that on a disc wheel set, there is no practical reason to run less spokes on the front. You need to dish your front wheel as well as your rear. And there is more stress on your hubs and spokes while braking.
    I lurk here to see what the roadies are doing. This is a normal stance, and it makes sense. On the MTB side disks have been around for a decade. We know that low spoke count has its limitations, and a lot of them are mitigated by using rims designed for low spoke count disk wheels. Factory wheels like the ones in question are dumb, but they work pretty well when the rim was designed for this application. Your truisms don't totally apply.


    All that said, mass production fashion wheels don't serve anyone and deserve a fiery death.

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