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  1. #1
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    Best Wheels under $1000

    Looking for a decent set of wheels for my 2010 Avanti Cadent 3.0, which is predominantly Shimano Ultegra 6700. I have a frame size of 56.5, I am 190cm and weight approx. 90 kg/198 lbs. At the moment I have the stock Shimano Ultegra wheels fitted (1652g pair). Looking to potentially purchase another wheelset for under $1000, my predominant riding preferences are a lot of hill climbing and sprinting on the flat so weight is key.

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

    Cheers
    Dan

  2. #2
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    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...?ModelID=67262

    the 20 spoke rear may be too few spokes depending on how rough you are on the wheels.


    I got the scandium/al version and love 'em.

  3. #3
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    williamscycling.com worth a look
    Disclaimer – I can bench more clowns then Lance and I invented the Trek.

  4. #4
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    I like HED Ardennes for their wider rim width among other things. IMO the LTs make the most sense value wise. You're at the upper end of their weight limit though they do make a "stallion" build for heavier riders.

  5. #5
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    I find it interesting that the $1000 price point always seems to come up. When I began looking into an alternative to the Aksiums I was using, I used the same number and spent a ton of time weeding though all the various opinions that were out there. Through all that time, I found two things to be true:

    1) You need to specifically define what it is you are to be using them for...climbing, training, sprinting....etc. You've done that.

    2) Decide if you want to do one of the following:
    a) Buy a set of factory built wheels. There are a million and one options and many of them very good if not excellent. The problem I personally have with factory is price point vs. what I am actually getting. I'm a 'best bang for your buck guy'
    b) Have a qualified wheelbuilder help you. He will have a bunch of opinions as well BUT he will be putting HIS name on the wheels and, assuming he has pride in his work, will want to do the best he can for you. I'm all for this choice if the last option isn't something you can or want to do.
    c) Build your own. Again, I spent a ton of time looking into this and decided it was well within my skillset AND I would be accountable to only myself. Additionally, I saved a good deal of money as well as having the pride of rolling around on a wheelset I built. When someone asks "Hey...nice wheels! Where'd ya get 'em?", you'll have a damn hard time whipping the grin off your face

    Mine cost me about $1000 to build two sets...1299 and 1290 grams respectively, Stans Alphas, DT spokes/nipples, Enduro Zero ceramic bearings. Roll like crazy and look sexy as hell.

    A thousand bucks is a good chunk of cash. Do your research and make every penny count.
    I honestly think it's possible for people to catch 'Stupid'.

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  6. #6
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    As heavy as you are, I wouldn't be looking at the REALLY lightweight clinchers. Maybe stick with wheels in the 1500 to 1600 gram range.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jsedlak View Post
    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...?ModelID=67262

    the 20 spoke rear may be too few spokes depending on how rough you are on the wheels.


    I got the scandium/al version and love 'em.
    I like these wheels as well, the versions you listed though are for tubeless rims.
    Clinchers can be found http://tidd.ly/7ab2b5aa

  9. #9
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    boydcycling.cm

    get the 50 mm and never look back. my friend is 202 lbs and he has been ridding his for over 6 months with no issues what so ever.
    2014 Cannondale SuperSix HM Evo Team Colors
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  10. #10
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    at your weight I would definitely stay clear of carbon clinchers. The brake track is a big issue - overheating on descents. There are lots of reports of failures on this site, including high end rims (Easton, Reynolds). Unless a lot of your climbing is on grades steeper than 7%, you'd be better served with aerodynamics, especially considering sprints on the flats. I'd suggest carbone sl, Hed Jet 60s, or roval 45sl. You can find deals on these for under $1k. OR save yourself a bunch of money and get kinlin 30s, 28 hole and aero spokes.

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    I have both the Roval 45sl and Shimano 7850 cl. I pretty much ride the Roval's exclusively. The 7850's may climb just a touch better but when it comes to descents and century's the Roval's and the aerodynamics are worth every penny. Of course, it may all be in my mind but hey, whatever.....

    Like Steve said....stay away from Carbon Clinchers if you typically ride long descents. I ride with two individuals that have had bad crashes due to carbon overheating and blowing a tire off the rim.

    I'm 6' and 175 lbs.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by CyclingVirtual View Post
    I like these wheels as well, the versions you listed though are for tubeless rims.
    Clinchers can be found http://tidd.ly/7ab2b5aa
    Would you not be able to run clinchers on the TL rim?

  13. #13
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    Of course you can, and you don't need rim strips.

  14. #14
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    HED Kermesse, solid as a rock and run great. Price is good for what you get. C2 extrusion is the bomb on a 23c tire as it spreads the contact patch and lessens the tire wall height. Been riding them and the Ardennes for 3 years now and love them. Great customer service as well.
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    Like, if "troubling" were a level seven worry, "concerning" would be a six, with "frightening" being an eight and "unexplained genital rash" being a nine.

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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlhillius View Post
    I find it interesting that the $1000 price point always seems to come up. When I began looking into an alternative to the Aksiums I was using, I used the same number and spent a ton of time weeding though all the various opinions that were out there. Through all that time, I found two things to be true:

    1) You need to specifically define what it is you are to be using them for...climbing, training, sprinting....etc. You've done that.

    2) Decide if you want to do one of the following:
    a) Buy a set of factory built wheels. There are a million and one options and many of them very good if not excellent. The problem I personally have with factory is price point vs. what I am actually getting. I'm a 'best bang for your buck guy'
    b) Have a qualified wheelbuilder help you. He will have a bunch of opinions as well BUT he will be putting HIS name on the wheels and, assuming he has pride in his work, will want to do the best he can for you. I'm all for this choice if the last option isn't something you can or want to do.
    c) Build your own. Again, I spent a ton of time looking into this and decided it was well within my skillset AND I would be accountable to only myself. Additionally, I saved a good deal of money as well as having the pride of rolling around on a wheelset I built. When someone asks "Hey...nice wheels! Where'd ya get 'em?", you'll have a damn hard time whipping the grin off your face

    Mine cost me about $1000 to build two sets...1299 and 1290 grams respectively, Stans Alphas, DT spokes/nipples, Enduro Zero ceramic bearings. Roll like crazy and look sexy as hell.

    A thousand bucks is a good chunk of cash. Do your research and make every penny count.
    Cost was $500 for one set and they came out under 1300 grams? Sounds great.

    Also if it is not too much trouble could you let me know where you bought the parts?

    Thanks!

  16. #16
    cmg
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlhillius View Post
    I find it interesting that the $1000 price point always seems to come up. When I began looking into an alternative to the Aksiums I was using, I used the same number and spent a ton of time weeding though all the various opinions that were out there. Through all that time, I found two things to be true:

    1) You need to specifically define what it is you are to be using them for...climbing, training, sprinting....etc. You've done that.

    2) Decide if you want to do one of the following:
    a) Buy a set of factory built wheels. There are a million and one options and many of them very good if not excellent. The problem I personally have with factory is price point vs. what I am actually getting. I'm a 'best bang for your buck guy'
    b) Have a qualified wheelbuilder help you. He will have a bunch of opinions as well BUT he will be putting HIS name on the wheels and, assuming he has pride in his work, will want to do the best he can for you. I'm all for this choice if the last option isn't something you can or want to do.
    c) Build your own. Again, I spent a ton of time looking into this and decided it was well within my skillset AND I would be accountable to only myself. Additionally, I saved a good deal of money as well as having the pride of rolling around on a wheelset I built. When someone asks "Hey...nice wheels! Where'd ya get 'em?", you'll have a damn hard time whipping the grin off your face

    Mine cost me about $1000 to build two sets...1299 and 1290 grams respectively, Stans Alphas, DT spokes/nipples, Enduro Zero ceramic bearings. Roll like crazy and look sexy as hell.

    A thousand bucks is a good chunk of cash. Do your research and make every penny count.
    what hubs did you use?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmg View Post
    what hubs did you use?
    Bikehubstore.com's SL78 and SL211 hubs. $100 bucks for the set to your front door.

    PM me if anyone wants the sources and costs for the build.
    I honestly think it's possible for people to catch 'Stupid'.

    Seems the only bi-partisan thing politicians can ever do is cheat on their wives.

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  18. #18
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    You are a bigger guy, so stick with 32 spokes if you choose stans alpha rims. Those rims are pretty lightweight.

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