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  1. #1
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    Cheap Tension Meter


  2. #2
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
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    It's nearly identical to the Park tension meter. If you're using it for consistency, great. If you're using it for absolute tension you're gonna need some way of making sure it stays calibrated properly.
    I work for some bike racers
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  3. #3
    Russian Troll Farmer
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    Frankly, my ears probably do as good a job....
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    It's nearly identical to the Park tension meter. If you're using it for consistency, great. If you're using it for absolute tension you're gonna need some way of making sure it stays calibrated properly.
    This seems to be pretty much the story with all tension meters. They work great for getting to equal tensions while less effective for absolute tensions.

    I have a Park tensiometer which I "calibrated" against the one the wheelbuilder in my bike shop uses. Mine read 2 graduations lower than theirs - 20 vs. 22 on one of their wheels. So which one is correct? Take an average?

    It also largely depends on how fast you release the lever on the spoke - that can make a difference of at least 1 graduation.

    What troubles me about the X-tools model is it appears to be using actual kgF numbers on the scale? How does the tool know what type of spokes you are using? Thinner spokes will give you difference readings than thicker spokes will. That's why Park Tool uses arbitrary numbers and gives you that spoke table.

    Buy cheap, buy twice.
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  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    The first review I read on this says it comes with a conversion chart for different spokes, the guy even made a shareable spreadsheet to do the conversions for you.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    It's nearly identical to the Park tension meter. If you're using it for consistency, great. If you're using it for absolute tension you're gonna need some way of making sure it stays calibrated properly.
    What do you think of this truing stand? Looks like a copy of Park's.
    http://www.wiggle.com/x-tools-pro-me...cksilver-one-s

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