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  1. #1
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    climbing wheels?

    so what is a good climbing and descending wheel? I don't race, weigh 160lbs, ride a lot of hills in north CA. I'm not interested in deep aero rim wheelsets due to crosswinds. I am thinking handbuilt with DA 7900 hubs, and what kind of rims? how many spokes and what lacing pattern? any suggestions welcome, even on manufactored wheelsets. how would the kinlin xr200 differ from open pro rims?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by deadleg
    so what is a good climbing and descending wheel? I don't race, weigh 160lbs, ride a lot of hills in north CA. I'm not interested in deep aero rim wheelsets due to crosswinds. I am thinking handbuilt with DA 7900 hubs, and what kind of rims? how many spokes and what lacing pattern? any suggestions welcome, even on manufactored wheelsets. how would the kinlin xr200 differ from open pro rims?
    You might consider this recent thread from a few days ago.

    Light Clincher Suggestions?
    It ain't rocket surgery. Buy everything on sale, pedal when you have too, coast when you can, and get home in one piece. Keep going forward - there is no reverse.

    OGWB

  3. #3
    Online Wheel Builder
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    Go with some Nimble Spider rims. They tie for the lightest clinchers ever with the Reynolds Mv32c ULs.

  4. #4
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    Stuck on these three, none of which meet your criteria, all of which see considerable use for both training and racing:

    Lightweight Standard Gen III
    Mavic Cosmic Carbone Ultimate
    Bontrager Race XXX Lite tubular

  5. #5
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    I can't speak for Lightweight or Bontrager, but I use Mavic CCUs. They have a nice ratio of weight to depth. Only available in tubular. I have crosswind issues with them, but I weigh 125lbs. I'd think 160lbs would be much safer.

    Given their carbon rim to rim spokes, the front wheel can't be trued. The rear wheel can, but where the spoke attaches to the nipple isn't very sturdy. I managed to break several spokes of my original rear wheel. I have the warranty and they replaced it, but just something to think about.

    If you're looking for climbing, I'm looking at some Zen Enlightenments with stainless steel spokes in the near future, but I'll be going with tubulars for racing.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zen Cyclery
    ightest clinchers ever
    I think we need a sticky at the top of this forum that lists rim weights from the lightest to heaviest in both clincher and tubular as questions as to lightest rims come up all the time.

    Any volunteers Austin?

    As a person who lost a lot of weight this year (35lbs) I'd possibly like to treat my svelte 165lb self to a set of lighter wheels that can compliment my lack of bulk. Maybe my 32h OP wheels are overkill for "special" rides. But what rims to buy!!
    .
    Mike The Bike's home wheelbuilding info - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder information and motivation.

    I'm not cranky; I just have a violent reaction to stupid people.

  7. #7
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    I am thinking alloy rims, not the lightest, but lighter than mavic open pro. I just want it all, light, durable, reasonable price.

  8. #8
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    Even though the Spider is the lightest rim available I think that it would be great in 24/28.

  9. #9
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    The wheels do not do the climbing, you do.
    You plus the bike weigh at least 175 lbs.
    Saving a couple hundred grams on wheels will not improve your climbing ability.
    Only training and loosing weight (if appropriate) will do that.
    Nothing wrong with having light wheels but I wouldn't spend a ton of money on them and they should also be durable and repairable on the road.

  10. #10
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    very true, especially that body fat.

    One or my concerns with OP wheels is I remember my old ones pinging on the climbs. Probably not tensioned properly. Do the old school 32 spoke 3x wheels need more maintenance than new high tension wheelsets? Being able to maintain them locally is nice, not needing maintenance is better.

  11. #11
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    Handbuilt wheels

    Suggest you contact a good local wheel builder. They can tailor the spoke count, stiffness and hubs to suit your weight and riding style. Worked for me and cost less than popular brands. Ended up with DT Swiss hubs, bladed spokes and Velocity rims.

  12. #12
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  13. #13
    So. Calif.
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    "climbing wheel" category is hype and over-rated, IMO.

    Light wheels are always preferred, eg 1300 - 1600 gram range. But going ultra-light seems crazy and will not make a measureable increase in performance .

    100g = just 3.5 ounces ... just go to bathroom before you ride ;-)

    A 24 ounce, full water bottle is over 700 gram.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by tom_h
    "climbing wheel" category is hype and over-rated, IMO.

    Light wheels are always preferred, eg 1300 - 1600 gram range. But going ultra-light seems crazy and will not make a measureable increase in performance .

    100g = just 3.5 ounces ... just go to bathroom before you ride ;-)

    A 24 ounce, full water bottle is over 700 gram.

    Hah! That's perspective...

  15. #15
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    I recently built a new set of wheels.

    front
    dura ace 7800 24 hole hub ( I wanted 20 hole, but no longer manufactured)
    dt revolution spokes radial heads in
    velocity aerohead rim

    rear
    dura ace 7850 28 hole hub
    drive side spokes dt supercomp 3x
    non drive spokes dt revolution radial heads out
    velocity aerohead OCR

    They weigh under 1500 g and ride like a dream. They accelerate super quick, climb fast, corner well, and give a really smooth ride. I weigh 175, live west on denver and do lots of climbing and descending.

    The only things I would change if I wanted a more perfedt wheelset would be, a 20 hole front hub like a silver Alchemy to match the DA rear, it's lighter than DA and has the widest flanges on the market. Sapim cx ray or dt aerolite spokes instead of revolution spokes, same weight, stronger, but easier to build with. The supercomp spokes are light, easy to build with and feel as stiff as a dt competition spoke. I really like the dura ace rear hubs, probably the most reliable out there.

    If you go with Velocity rims, get some Velocity Veloplugs instead of rim tape, it will save you a little more wieght where you really want save it.

    A wheelset similar to this will not dissapoint.
    Last edited by twinkles; 11-20-2009 at 11:44 PM.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeLuz
    The wheels do not do the climbing, you do.
    You plus the bike weigh at least 175 lbs.
    Saving a couple hundred grams on wheels will not improve your climbing ability.
    Only training and loosing weight (if appropriate) will do that.
    Nothing wrong with having light wheels but I wouldn't spend a ton of money on them and they should also be durable and repairable on the road.

    Always a favorite statement. Some people can climb and want more. Even if one person feels as if it's a waste (or is rationalizing), someone else may feel as if they deserve it.

    Also go by the three rule--- light, strong, cheap-- pick 2, although depending on your persepective, there seem to be more and more reasonable sets coming out that get closer to all 3.

  17. #17
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    Thanks, I will look for a similiar build. anyone recommend a wheelbuilder?

  18. #18
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    Zen Cyclery

    Quote Originally Posted by deadleg
    Thanks, I will look for a similiar build. anyone recommend a wheelbuilder?
    Get in touch with Austin at Zen Cyclery (he posted above)

    http://www.zencyclery.com/

    He built these awesome wheels for me...








  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by deadleg
    Thanks, I will look for a similiar build. anyone recommend a wheelbuilder?

    Joe Young.

    Jeff

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Squiggles
    Get in touch with Austin at Zen Cyclery (he posted above)

    http://www.zencyclery.com/

    He built these awesome wheels for me...







    What handlebars are those?

  21. #21
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    They're FSA wing pro bars with the compact drop.

  22. #22
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    I will say this, ron ruff did a nice job on my wheels. also, i really like the alchemy hubs. they are awesome. light and strong. well priced to considering they come std with ceramic bearings.

  23. #23
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    The best climbing wheels are these wheels who are aerodynamic (deep rim carbon) and light also. But this combination is always very expensive. Now I'm riding with Fulcrum Racing Zero's, under 1.500 gr en not to expensive... but offcourse, not aerodynamic.

  24. #24
    So. Calif.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kapoen
    The best climbing wheels are these wheels who are aerodynamic (deep rim carbon) and light also. But this combination is always very expensive. Now I'm riding with Fulcrum Racing Zero's, under 1.500 gr en not to expensive... but offcourse, not aerodynamic.
    How fast are you climbing? ;-)
    The benefits of aero wheels don't start to appear, until average speeds achieve low-to-mid 20s MPH (35-40 kph).

    OTOH, I will grant that steep ascents are often followed by fast descents, where aero wheels could provide a benefit.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by tom_h
    How fast are you climbing? ;-)
    The benefits of aero wheels don't start to appear, until average speeds achieve low-to-mid 20s MPH (35-40 kph).

    OTOH, I will grant that steep ascents are often followed by fast descents, where aero wheels could provide a benefit.
    You aren't quoting enough tom_h. I said a combination of light weight AND aerodynamic results in the fastest climbing. They did a test on the climb of Alpe d'Huez. A trispoke 'heavy' aerodynamic wheel vs. a lighter conventional wheel. The conventional wheel wins after 14,3 km of climbing with 8 meter after a lot of calculating work. But the aerodynamic shape of the trispokes results in 15,5 meter gain. Result: 15,5 - 8 = a gain of 7,5 meter for the aerodynamic wheel. This is offcourse pure theory, but it's a sign that even aerodynamic wheels can be useful in the mountains. ;)

    Here's the test. It's unfortunately only in Dutch.

    http://www.henkleenaers.nl/fiets22.htm

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