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  1. #1
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    Clincher tire recommendations for light off-road use

    Hi, I'm looking for help with clincher tires. I'm looking for a tire that is relatively light-weight and 25c or larger in width that can be used for 80% road use, 10% dirt road use, and 10% gravel road use. I weigh between 170-180 lbs. The wheels I'll be using are Velocity A 23 rims with White Industries M 15 hubs. I live in the Pacific Northwest, hence in the spring and early summer, we have a lot of wet weather. I've found a few that look appealing (listed below), but I'd like the group's input for other recommendations. Also, if this has already been asked 1400+ times, I'd love to see the discussions from prior threads.

    Here are a few I've found that I'm most interested in with my perceived drawbacks listed next to them:

    - Vittoria Open Pave CG (a little small, expensive)
    - Challenge Parigi Roubaix (none that I can see)
    - Michelin Pro 3 Optimum (none that I can see)
    - Schwalbe Ultremo R.1 black 25c (expensive, maybe a little too light for my purposes)
    - Schwalbe Marathon Racer 30c (heavier than most of the others, a little larger than what I'm looking for)
    - Vredestein Fiammante Duocomp 25c (may be harder to get)

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Avoid the Ultremo. A great race tire, but purely for the smooth stuff. Can't go wrong with the Pave. Marathons are the toughest on the list, but you're right probably overkill. I've no experience with the Challenge and Vred tires, nor the Michelin in its "optimum" incarnation. I wouldn't use a plain Pro 3, though. One that has served me very well for the occasionally gravel road detour is the Continental Grand Prix 4 season. Vittoria Zaffiro Pros are tough as nails, too.

  3. #3
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    I've found the Michelin Krylion Carbon to be pretty tough -- probably better than any of the ones just listed except for the Marathon, which would be noticeably slower.
    Virginia Bicycling Federation (www.vabike.org)
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  4. #4
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    schwalbe marathons, or Small Block 8's, but those may have a little too much rolling resistance for your pavement use.

  5. #5
    EuroCrash
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    ditto on the Continental Grand Prix 4 season in 25 mm

  6. #6
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    In the wet, how do those dirt roads hold up? Do they get muddy?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quixote
    Avoid the Ultremo.
    Worth repeating.

    Paves are really nice but not sure I'd trust them on dirt roads. Perhaps you're idea of what a dirt road is differs from mine though.
    I'm not familiar with the others.

  8. #8
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    it depends how much off roading and how serious that is. the Gp4000 all season means that u can ride it on damp/light rainy roads. it is still a slick and dangerous for faster speeds over 20mph and 90 degree turns over 15mph.

    the marathons have a thicker treat and people use them to commute all the time. They will be slower than the gp4000 all season, but you wont have to worry on any dirt and rain. Same goes for the SB8's and those can even handle cyclocross riding...

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the responses. The dirt roads around Portland typically get somewhat muddy in the early spring and stay that way up until mid to late June. The mud typically isn't the thick, caking kind, but is more slick and slippery. That doesn't necessarily mean that a slick tire would handle it any better than thicker, stickier mud. Typically, if the dirt roads are in that kind of condition I'd be staying off of them - or, at least wouldn't be riding a road/'cross bike (with road tires) on it.

    I don't race road and my spring and summer road rides are typically for having fun, developing power, and improving handling skills for the summer off-road triathlon season and, of course, being in Portland, cyclo-cross season. At the end of the day, for my purposes, having a stronger, more stable tire such as the Marathon, may be better, although I'm going to take another look at the Challenge, Vittoria, and Continental options.

    Any other opinions?

    Thanks again. This helps.

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