Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 40 of 40
  1. #26
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    8,711
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Repped! I just love it when I pass a 20-30 something guy up a hill with his $3K Zipp carbon wheels with minimal spoke count while I'm a 57 y.o. guy on my conventional 32 spoke alloy wheels!
    I have a 32 rear wheel.

    Passing someone with low spoke carbon wheels in an imaginary race they don't know about does nothing for me.

  2. #27
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    7,578
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    I have a 32 rear wheel.

    Passing someone with low spoke carbon wheels in an imaginary race they don't know about does nothing for me.
    That depends. If they're half my age, it's a big ego trip.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  3. #28
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    8,711
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    That depends. If they're half my age, it's a big ego trip.
    No, it does not depend for me at all. I've passed former pros that are younger than me, sports cars and been passed by much older old overweight riders on a junk hybrid.
    Getting a charge out of passing someone that has no clue there's competition going on is not for me.

    Makes about as much sense as sucker punching someone on the street and thinking that says something about relative fighting ability.

  4. #29
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    5,022
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    I have a 32 rear wheel.

    Passing someone with low spoke carbon wheels in an imaginary race they don't know about does nothing for me.
    Imaginary races are the only kind I can win! I can't defend it it by I do get some sort of perverse pleasure from passing someone on a tricked out high-zoot bike with my retro-steel stead and old-school wheels

  5. #30
    wheelbuilder
    Reputation: ergott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    2,206
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post


    Reread both phrases I highlighted here and you will see they contradict each other. In order for a rim to work reliably with 20 spokes, it needs to be heavier than a rim would need to be to work reliably with 32 spokes. Weight wise, it turns out to be nearly a wash.

    Also, the aero advantages of using fewer spokes are negligible and won't be realized under 20mph. The rider is the least aero part of the bike.
    Speaking about aluminium rims, I'd put the lightest rims I'd use for a 32 spoke wheel at around 410g and that would be questionable for a rear wheel. I regularly build sets of wheels with 44 spokes (20/24) to rims weighing 445g. The spoke weight difference at best (using all light gauge spokes) would be over 100g for the set and rim total is 70g. Yes that's close enough to argue it's a wash to many, but 30g it is. If the wheels are more aerodynamic (there is no minimum speed for there to be a gain) it's a win-win. Doesn't mean it will completely transform your riding, but the effects are cumulative and on 4-5 hour rides it's nice to have the advantage.

    With carbon it's a no brainer. I have a wheelset that's 1022g. More aero than any 32 spoke wheel and about a pound lighter. They are strong enough for my daily riding and spirited sprints. I have 32/32 on my disc bike, but for rim brakes I'm very happy with low spoke counts.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  6. #31
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    8,711
    Quote Originally Posted by ergott View Post

    With carbon it's a no brainer. I have a wheelset that's 1022g
    . More aero than any 32 spoke wheel and about a pound lighter. They are strong enough for my daily riding and spirited sprints. I have 32/32 on my disc bike, but for rim brakes I'm very happy with low spoke counts.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    Clinchers? If so I'd be curious what rim, or rims, you've had that success with?
    1022g is low enough to make me re-think carbon rims. But not to re-think tubular, that I know for sure ain't for me.

  7. #32
    pmf
    pmf is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    4,932
    I get custom wheels built from an outfit called Psimet. They've done three sets for me and they're nice. The first set I ordered the guy said to go with 28R/24F. I asked him about 32R and he said 'I can do that, but it won't make the wheel any stronger'. I took his advice. For my wife, he suggested 24R/20F. we've not had problems with any of his wheels.

    Does increased spoke tension make wheels stronger? I remember the spokes on my old 32/32 Mavic Open 4 rims with DT DB spokes having much less tension than wheels do these days.

  8. #33
    wheelbuilder
    Reputation: ergott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    2,206
    Tubular. Do people still ride clinchers for road?

    I have done clincher versions in the 1200g range. Not hard

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  9. #34
    changingleaf
    Reputation: changingleaf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    611
    More tension does not make wheels stronger as long as the spokes have high enough tension to remain in a state of tension under normal riding conditions.

    The max tension guidelines for rims is generally the way to go.

    The strength of any given wheel is combination of the number of spokes, size of the spoke, strength of the rim, and bracing angle of the spokes.

    I recommend only minimizing the number of spokes after taking into account the other factors plus the size and strength of the rider, the type of riding the wheels will be used for, and the amount robustness or safety factor the rider would like built into the wheels; that is accounting for riding events outside of normal riding conditions.

  10. #35
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Notvintage's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    1,204
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Getting a charge out of passing someone that has no clue there's competition going on is not for me.
    Exactly. I laugh hearing clowns bragging about passing someone on a nice bike or whatever. It means absolutely nothing at all. Maybe they are coming back from sickness, riding an easy day, coming back from an injury. . .

  11. #36
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    227
    Quote Originally Posted by Notvintage View Post
    Exactly. I laugh hearing clowns bragging about passing someone on a nice bike or whatever. It means absolutely nothing at all. Maybe they are coming back from sickness, riding an easy day, coming back from an injury. . .
    Good things to consider. As people pass me I can yell out "Hey, this is my recovery day!"

  12. #37
    A wheelist
    Reputation: Mike T.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,305
    Quote Originally Posted by Lallement View Post
    As people pass me I can yell out "Hey, this is my recovery day!"
    In the past I've yelled "Hey - Eddy Merckx......I'm dragging 64 ****ing spokes around!". Then they fall back with a sheepish embarrassed grin and ride 30' behind me. I kid you not.
    .
    Mike T's home wheelbuilding site - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilders with motivation, information and resources.

  13. #38
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    20,824
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T. View Post
    In the past I've yelled "Hey - Eddy Merckx......I'm dragging 64 ****ing spokes around!". Then they fall back with a sheepish embarrassed grin and ride 30' behind me. I kid you not.
    But what are the chances that the actually know who Eddy Merckx is?

  14. #39
    A wheelist
    Reputation: Mike T.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,305
    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    But what are the chances that the actually know who Eddy Merckx is?
    Say it assertive enough and they know it must be someone important.
    .
    Mike T's home wheelbuilding site - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilders with motivation, information and resources.

  15. #40
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,187
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    I don't know very many people who HAVEN'T cracked a Bontrager rim - especially when they were doing the paired spoke design. Yours truly for one! 4K miles and the rear wheel was toast. And I only weigh 175lbs!
    I've got a rear Bontrager with cracks around a few of the holes. It's hanging on the wall in the garage. 5500 miles on it. But I'm a card carrying Clydesdale at 220 pounds.
    To those in uniform, both present and past, who have protected my freedoms, I thank you. I've had a good life so far.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Any downsides to wearing a mountain helmet?
    By redline09 in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 06-01-2010, 09:41 AM
  2. Tarmac S-Works E5: Any downsides?
    By no msg in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-20-2008, 06:41 AM
  3. What's some of the downsides to CF frames?
    By rger8 in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: 08-03-2007, 09:55 AM
  4. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10-28-2005, 08:26 AM
  5. Super light bikes--upsides/downsides?
    By SANDICO in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 07-30-2005, 08:27 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

roadbikereview.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.