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  1. #1
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    Dura-Ace 9000 Hubs

    I'd like to build a wheelset with the newest Dura-Ace 9000 hubs. I was planning on a 24 hole front and 28 hole rear. I'm a light rider, so I'd rather have a 20 hole front, but Shimano's website says 24 hole is the lowest hole count.....but I just found a 18 hole front on eBay (from Japan) and also on Bike24.com (German company I believe)!

    Do you think it's legit???

  2. #2
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    Bike24 probably is...


    That being said...why do you want less strong wheels?
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    Bike24 probably is...


    That being said...why do you want less strong wheels?
    Exactly. Do you really think 4 fewer spokes will weigh that much less or be that much more aero to make you go noticeably faster? Nope!

    Also, more spokes will give you a stiffer wheel.

    Whether the lower spoke DA hub is legit, don't know for sure. Shimano's website only lists down to 24 hole.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
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  4. #4
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    Not just 4 fewer spokes, but 6, for a huge 30 gram weight loss! :P

    I just emailed Bike24 asking them to verify. We'll see what they say...

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by fiziksdrop180 View Post
    Not just 4 fewer spokes, but 6, for a huge 30 gram weight loss! :P

    I just emailed Bike24 asking them to verify. We'll see what they say...
    Laugh all you want, but one thing is for sure. If you break a spoke on a 24 hole wheel 30 miles from home, you can adjust adjacent spokes to get the wheel true enough to get you home. If you break a spoke on an 18 hole wheel, you will be calling for a ride.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Laugh all you want, but one thing is for sure. If you break a spoke on a 24 hole wheel 30 miles from home, you can adjust adjacent spokes to get the wheel true enough to get you home. If you break a spoke on an 18 hole wheel, you will be calling for a ride.
    I weigh 190 ish and broke a spoke on a 28 spoke rear wheel that was hand built and the thing was a complete mess. i sometimes think some folks oversell the handmade myth.

  7. #7
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    Don't

    You can get built up wheel sets, probably for less. These hubs require special spokes. Why bother?

    Look at Shimano pre-built wheel sets.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by FasterStronger View Post
    I weigh 190 ish and broke a spoke on a 28 spoke rear wheel that was hand built and the thing was a complete mess. i sometimes think some folks oversell the handmade myth.

    As long as you know what to do with a spoke wrench, you can get a 28 spoke wheel true enough to get home without tire rub.

    As far as the "handmade myth", it's like anything else. There are both excellent and lousy wheel builders out there. You have to choose wisely. Or better yet, learn to build your own wheels.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tlaloc View Post
    You can get built up wheel sets, probably for less. These hubs require special spokes. Why bother?
    Which hubs require special spokes? Just about any factory built wheelset uses proprietary parts.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  10. #10
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    Well, it is a fun project to build a unique wheelset.
    But, you're right, it will cost more than a Dura Ace factory-built jobber.
    And, I've never broken a spoke on any factory wheelset.
    Broke numerous on my handbuilt ones thru the years, making my ride more adventurous than necessary.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by fast ferd View Post
    Well, it is a fun project to build a unique wheelset.
    But, you're right, it will cost more than a Dura Ace factory-built jobber.
    That all depends on what rims and spokes you choose. The pair of wheels I built this year with DA hubs were less expensive than DA factory wheels.

    If you are breaking spokes on wheels you're building, you are doing something wrong. Maybe you could elaborate on your build so we could help you avoid a problem in the future.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by FasterStronger View Post
    I weigh 190 ish and broke a spoke on a 28 spoke rear wheel that was hand built and the thing was a complete mess. i sometimes think some folks oversell the handmade myth.
    If someone claims that somehow a hand built wheel with 28 spokes will work better after a spoke breaks than a factory wheel with 28 spokes, then yes they are overselling. A 28 spoke wheel will almost always be unrideable with a broken spoke, though should be able to be on-road trued to be rideable with a very significant thump. A 32 is far better in that respect.

    More likely it is someone misinterpreting the value of a hand built wheel rather than the builder making spurious claims. The bike world is FULL of misunderstandings like this, and worse.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    If someone claims that somehow a hand built wheel with 28 spokes will work better after a spoke breaks than a factory wheel with 28 spokes, then yes they are overselling. A 28 spoke wheel will almost always be unrideable with a broken spoke, though should be able to be on-road trued to be rideable with a very significant thump...........
    Really a very significant thump?? I once broke a spoke on a 24 spoke rear wheel and managed to adjust it to be true enough to get me 30 more miles back to the start site. Granted it was less stable and I took it slow on the downhills for sure. But there was no thump or frame rubbing.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    That all depends on what rims and spokes you choose. The pair of wheels I built this year with DA hubs were less expensive than DA factory wheels.

    If you are breaking spokes on wheels you're building, you are doing something wrong. Maybe you could elaborate on your build so we could help you avoid a problem in the future.
    Wow, thanks, are you some sort of wheelbuilding expert?
    I've built a hundred wheels for over forty years, from BMX to cruiser to road. Any spokes popped occurred after thousands of miles of usage; never in anything less than a few thousand miles, and then only from a road hazard.
    Let me see, rough numbers...about the best you can do on a pair of DA9000 hubs is $400, good spokes/nipples at $70, and good rims at $200. So I suppose this runs less than some DA9100 C24's at around $750. I think I'd still go the C24 route.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by fast ferd View Post
    Wow, thanks, are you some sort of wheelbuilding expert?
    I've built a hundred wheels for over forty years, from BMX to cruiser to road. Any spokes popped occurred after thousands of miles of usage; never in anything less than a few thousand miles, and then only from a road hazard.
    Let me see, rough numbers...about the best you can do on a pair of DA9000 hubs is $400, good spokes/nipples at $70, and good rims at $200. So I suppose this runs less than some DA9100 C24's at around $750. I think I'd still go the C24 route.
    LOL! Expert? Hardly! What kind of road hazards are you talking about?

    I really find it hard to believe you are popping spokes here and there if you have 40 years and 100 wheels of experience, unless the thousands of miles you are talking about are over 10,000 or the road hazards are craters to hell.

    Maybe other wheel builders here on this forum can chime in. Granted if I were to go the factory route, it would be Shimano. I still don't like low spoke count wheels. Do you think you can get a 16 spoke wheel true enough to get home if you break a spoke and are down to 15?
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  16. #16
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    The last 8 years I'm riding mainly home built wheels (av. 10000 km/y) and not a single spoke has popped.
    Spoke count from 32/32 to 24/20 , weight 80 kg on road bikes and I can't say I'm a professional at 1 or 2 sets a year.
    Regular popping spokes points at something being wrong, but impossible to say what without knowing the details.

  17. #17
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    Guess I needed to define "numerous." Seems you fellas turned it into "regular" and "here and there."

    Numerous = four times.
    Probably 30,000 miles per wheelset, with each suffering a spoke break late in the wheel's life. 32 spoke (usually butted), 3X pattern. Mostly Dura Ace 8 or 9 sp hubs and Mavic rims on my commuter bike. Sometimes the breakage occurred on the second round of rims, using the same spokes. Sometimes I never broke a spoke on these. Whatever.

    My point is that the factory-built ones utilize some beefy spokes. And the wheels do not go out of true, despite smacking some monstrous potholes. Your results may vary.

    I get that you're defending handbuilts, which I love riding on. From my experience, they are not as sturdy. In my opinion...yada yada yada.

  18. #18
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    Well at 30,000 miles, a wheel really doesn't owe you anything. You mean your brake tracks lasted that long without going concave? Are you telling me your factory builts went this long or more with no problems?

    And if you think "beefy" spokes make for fewer problems, why don't you build with these? From what I understand, butted spokes are counter intuitively more durable because thinner middle section causes less flexing at nipple threads and j-bends where spokes are most vulnerable

    I'm not trying to be snarky. Just trying to understand.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



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