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  1. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swerny View Post
    so i'm looking for Chinese carbon road disc wheels for my Scott Solace 10 Disc.

    12x100, 12x142 hubs with centrelock rotors.
    I ordered and received a pair with similar specs a few months back for my Roubaix.

    Yoeleo C38, 25mm wide, 12x142 DT240s - centrelock, J-hook Sapim CX-Ray spokes.

    They have been pretty solid so far. A little early to give an informed review but this is my second set of C38 wheels; I have a rim brake pair on another bike since last summer.

  2. #127
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  3. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by goatygoatface View Post
    I ordered and received a pair with similar specs a few months back for my Roubaix.

    Yoeleo C38, 25mm wide, 12x142 DT240s - centrelock, J-hook Sapim CX-Ray spokes.

    They have been pretty solid so far. A little early to give an informed review but this is my second set of C38 wheels; I have a rim brake pair on another bike since last summer.
    thanks!
    Mike
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    2016 Scott Solace 10 Disc
    2017 Diamondback Haanjo Trail Carbon
    2017 Trek Farley 9.6

  4. #129
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    In late 2015 I started to look for a light carbon wheel set, since I was planning to add a "climbing" bike. I ended up with a leftover Cervelo R2 that came with heavy Shimano wheels late Spring of 2016. During my wheel search I ran into the "cheap Chinese carbon wheel" vortex of opinions and decided to see if I could find some reviews on these "cheap" wheels by cyclists that had purchased and were riding them.

    The few reviews I found were generally favorable, although some brands had better initial build quality than others. Pretty normal. Then I ran across an ICAN carbon wheel video review and eventually decided to give their wheels a shot based on several other very good write ups. Didn't order from Ebay, got 'em from Amazon.

    I ordered a 38 mm deep Sapim spoked clinchers and they arrived in just 12 days. The price was a little over $400 at the time, so extremely "cheap", especially compared to the big brand names. It took me about a week extra to get tape, tires and cassette mounted. Yes, the new Conti GP 4000S ll tires were a bear to put on, but doable, just took a little patience. Part of the problem might have been that our weather was still relatively cool, and I think if I could have warmed the tires under a little sunshine, it might have made the mounting process a little easier.

    Spinning these wheels showed they were true right from the box and I couldn't find a badly tensioned spoke. The hubs silent and spun very nicely. I was pretty impressed, especially with how light they were. I had already put over 300 miles on the Cervelo with the Shimano wheels that held it up and could tell the difference right away.

    I live in Maine and our roads are beaten up pretty badly by our wacky Winter weather so I was a little more than apprehensive about the integrity of these wheels. I had always used aluminum and not so long ago, steel wheels. I go back a ways cycling. Anyway, I had definitely read the warnings about how these "off brand" wheels would crumple and leave my broken body and bike on the ground after decomposing mid ride somewhere after hitting an expansion joint or pebble.

    I was obviously very cautious on my first few rides on the ICANs, but confidence in the build quality of these wheels increased pretty rapidly. They now have well over 2,000 miles on them. I spread my riding season among 3 road bikes with separate sets of wheels. A heavy endurance bike for early season rides, an aero bike for "flat(er)" rides and the newer R2 for the hills. Speed wise, the R2 now approaches and sometimes equals my more aero bike in quite a few Strava segments.

    The ICANs are silent, very strong and stiff enough for my 180 to 190 pounds (depends on time of bike season) to get up out of the saddle and stand on the pedals to get up a hill if I need to without flexing into the brake pads. Light weight wheels make a huge difference. I can accelerate them quite easily on climbs and more importantly, they let me stay up with the younger guys in group rides, which is really good for the old ego.

    I've hit plenty of bumps at speed with these wheels... it's inevitable, especially when riding in groups or during events. They have not decomposed. I do check them for cracks and nicks after every ride and clean the brake pads and braking surfaces to keep from scarring. None yet. I'm still running 23mm tires at 110-115 psi. The bike and wheel compliance combine to give me a fairly smooth ride on normal road surfaces. I might go to a 25mm tire when tires wear out. I'm still mulling that one over some.

    They have become my favorite wheelset and I actually now look for hills to climb. I think they are one of the best buys I've made. Wicked nice wheels.
    At my age, it's all uphill!!!

  5. #130
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    https://www.specialized.com/us/en/ro...c-front/118666
    https://www.specialized.com/us/en/ro...sc-rear/118667

    Does anyone know if there's a Chinese equivalent to whatever rims Roval is using in these wheels?

    50 deep
    21 internal
    29 external
    21/24 spoke counts
    650/770 weight

    The aggregate weight is *really* impressive. It suggests a rim weight of around 430g. I can't find any Chinese rims in 50mm depth at that weight, never mind >18mm internal. In fact, I can only find one rim at the same width at all: LB's RR46C02 (460g).

  6. #131
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    Nope. I've never yet seen a Chinese wheel with inner dimension more than around 16mm internal in 50mm depth and only 23mm external. Weight of the ICAN 50mm wheel set is close at around 1460g. Rider weight limit is up around 105kg.

    I imagine that wider wheels will be coming as the trend toward wider continues. I have no problem with ICAN specs, especially when you count the price difference between $2,400.00 for the Roval wheels and $545.00 for the ICAN set.
    At my age, it's all uphill!!!

  7. #132
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    So far, these are the most compelling rims I see at the 50mm and 60mm sizes:

    https://www.carbonfan.com/carbonfan-...ad-rims-series

    AR50C01 asymmetric road disc XC carbon rims 25mm outer width 50mm depth 700C clincher ready

    depth / max width / brake width / internal width / weight
    50 / 26 / 25 / 19 / 460
    60 / 28 / 25 / 17.4 / 470

    Carbonfan has verified the weight of the 60mm rim isn't in error. As above, LB's 45mm is the only wider alternative, though that profile doesn't exist in deeper sizes.

  8. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldbikah View Post
    Nope. I've never yet seen a Chinese wheel with inner dimension more than around 16mm internal in 50mm depth and only 23mm external. Weight of the ICAN 50mm wheel set is close at around 1460g. Rider weight limit is up around 105kg.

    I imagine that wider wheels will be coming as the trend toward wider continues. I have no problem with ICAN specs, especially when you count the price difference between $2,400.00 for the Roval wheels and $545.00 for the ICAN set.
    The ICAN FL50 is available with an internal width of 18.5 and external of 25. With the Novatec hubs and Sapim spokes, they have a claimed weight of 1470. I picked up a set via Amazon about one month ago and have had a similar experience to yours -- very positive.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

  9. #134
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    That's probably my next set of ICANs. Good to hear that you like these wheels. They're a really good product. Huge bang for the bucks, relatively speaking. The Novatec hubs are still running smooth and quiet. Another good surprise.

    I just finished a 62.1 mile afternoon ride in very strong head and cross wind conditions today with a total of 2,502 feet of elevation gained according to Strava. The 38mm depth ICANs were easy to handle. Imagine a 50mm would be even more aero in head on winds and would be interesting how they would do in blustery cross winds. I'll eventually find out.
    At my age, it's all uphill!!!

  10. #135
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    Does anyone have experience with carbon TUBELESS rims from China? I have bought several frames and wheetsets in years past, but none that were advertised as tubeless.

    I am wanting to build up a set to run tubeless for cx and gravel road riding.
    Thanks!

  11. #136
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    I believe if you go on the amazon site and look through the ICAN wheel sets, you'll find a couple of tubeless ready rims. Mine aren't tubeless ready, but still can't say anything bad about them. Great quality, and unexpected light weight, especially for the price.
    At my age, it's all uphill!!!

  12. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldbikah View Post
    Nope. I've never yet seen a Chinese wheel with inner dimension more than around 16mm internal in 50mm depth and only 23mm external. Weight of the ICAN 50mm wheel set is close at around 1460g. Rider weight limit is up around 105kg.

    I imagine that wider wheels will be coming as the trend toward wider continues. I have no problem with ICAN specs, especially when you count the price difference between $2,400.00 for the Roval wheels and $545.00 for the ICAN set.
    That's a pretty thin rim.

    If I'm going to spend the money, I'd expect 23mm - minimally - inside dimension for a modern road bike. Otherwise, heck, my heavy aluminum wheels roll too beautifully to warrant paying money for lighter, yet old-school-thin, wheels.

  13. #138
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    I'm pretty "old school", and still ride 23mm tires on my road bikes. I've tried the wider wheel/tire combinations on my "endurance" road bike and yes, they are comfortable and can ride them at slightly lower pressure than the skinnier old schoolers. On the other side of the coin, the wider wheels and tires do present a bit of a weight and aero disadvantage. The ICAN wheels are 23mm outside measurement and present a very smooth wheel to 23mm tire profile.

    On the endurance frame with the wider wheels and tires I'm way more comfortable, but I'm also using considerably more energy on the hills and in head wind conditions. Hills and head winds are the conditions I ride most frequently around where I live. If I rode in an area with flatter terrain and in less wind, then that heavier rotational mass of the wider wheel/tire combination would probably not make as big a difference.

    I find the "suffer quotient" to be pretty distinct, especially on the upward sections of hills when I use wider (heavier) tires. In recent 60 mile back to back rides with a one day of rest between them, I definitely was way more used up after riding the wider tires. Both rides included a fairly moderate 3,000 feet of elevation gain on the same route. Ride weather was less humid, a little less warm and not as windy on the day I used the wider tires.

    Workout wise, I probably got more benefit pushing the wider heavier hoops around. On a longer ride, say a century, the lighter/skinny more aero wheel/tire would still be my choice. Both types of wheel/tire combinations have advantages and disadvantages.
    At my age, it's all uphill!!!

  14. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldbikah View Post
    On the endurance frame with the wider wheels and tires I'm way more comfortable, but I'm also using considerably more energy on the hills and in head wind conditions.

    ... In recent 60 mile back to back rides with a one day of rest between them, I definitely was way more used up after riding the wider tires.
    I'm not sold on your data. You sample set was one pair of rides? With what tires on what wheels at what pressure?

  15. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexdi View Post
    I'm not sold on your data. You sample set was one pair of rides? With what tires on what wheels at what pressure?
    I'm not selling data so no need to buy. It's just a personal observation/comparison on the same route.

    Bikes are about 1 lb different, 17.9 compared to 19.1 lbs. Tires on my road bike are 23mm Continental GP4000S II clinchers, at 105-110 psi on ICAN 38mm deep wheels. The 19.1 lb "Endurance" bike 28mm Vittoria Zaffiro Pro Slick, inflated to 90-95 psi on 27mm deep aluminum wheels.
    At my age, it's all uphill!!!

  16. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldbikah View Post
    Bikes are about 1 lb different, 17.9 compared to 19.1 lbs. Tires on my road bike are 23mm Continental GP4000S II clinchers, at 105-110 psi on ICAN 38mm deep wheels. The 19.1 lb "Endurance" bike 28mm Vittoria Zaffiro Pro Slick, inflated to 90-95 psi on 27mm deep aluminum wheels.
    So the lighter bike with more aerodynamic wheels and geometry was easier to ride?

  17. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexdi View Post
    So the lighter bike with more aerodynamic wheels and geometry was easier to ride?
    About a 1 pound difference between bikes weights doesn't make much difference under a 185 pound rider. Lighter tires combined with lighter more aero wheels do allow way better speed overall, but the biggest differences manifest going up a hill. I'm not anywhere close to pro level wattage output, so I really do feel those differences. The 23mm Conti GP4000S IIs weigh in around 215g while the 28mm Vittoria Zaffiro Pro Slicks come in around 400g. Bigger tire, bigger weight, significantly bigger rotational mass across the board, even with the same wheel.

    The aero advantage is quite a bit tougher to determine, since I'm not running the 28mm tires on the road bike with the lighter and more aero wheels. But those 28mm tires do punch a slightly bigger hole in the air. A 25mm would be lighter, while presenting a slightly smaller cross section to the wind. I would love to run a 20mm front tire on an aero bike. I haven't tried that one yet.

    I have deep drops on the Endurance bike, enough to let me get as low and horizontal as my road bike, so most of the aero differences have to come from the frames and the wheel/tire aspects. It's obvious that I don't have the best way to compare the wheel/tire combination differences, but at the same time with all other things being equal, lighter wheels and tires win going up a hill and anything more aero should definitely win against the wind. Tough to beat physics.
    At my age, it's all uphill!!!

  18. #143
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    A little review of the Chinese wheels I bought.
    First, I'll tell you I am NOT any kind of wheel or bicycle expert. Just an average 59 year old guy slowly but surely getting more & more addicted to bicycle riding over the last 10 years or so. With that said I ride about 3,500 miles a year, with some of that on mountain bikes.
    I ordered a set carbon clinchers from https://www.yoeleobike.com/carbon-bi...-road-std.html
    38mm front / 50 mm rear, 25 mm outer width, 19 mm inner width. Sapin spokes and their in house SL hubs with ceramic bearings. $792 shipped. 1,403 gm as received.
    They say they are tubless ready (and they look it) but I am using tubes with Conti GP 4000 25 mm tires. Tires went on very easy, but after 40 years of riding & racing dirtbikes, I'm not too bad at tire changing I didn't try to measure how true they spun but they sure looked true to me after getting them on the bike. I run 75 psi front / 80 psi rear (I weigh 140 lb.), the tires measure 27.9 mm wide because of the wide rim. I now have approximately 1,000 miles on New England roads.

    So far I am very happy with these wheels, especially for under $1,000! They are pretty light, the width lets me run low air pressure which makes for a very nice ride. I guess they are aero, but who the hell really knows. I could probably slam my stem and get more aero but I'm not going to do that. And they look cool in matt black with no badeging on them!

    Biggest drawback?? 67 days from the day I ordered them until the day they arrived on my doorstep! While their customer service person was fairly timely returning emails she was very obviously not very good with the English language. VERY frustrating trying to get clear answers on a order that is supposed to take 15 days.

  19. #144
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    A lot of things can delay delivery, from Customs snarls to product inventory and of course how each individual company handles volume at the shipping point among other reasons. The ICAN shipment time length was stated as 30 days or so. I received mine in 12 days. Luck of the draw probably. Good to hear you like your wheels and are holding up on New England road surfaces. I feel your pain.
    At my age, it's all uphill!!!

  20. #145
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    2017 ROAD DISC BRAKE ASYMMETRIC RIMS-Yishunbike

    New rims from Yishun:

    WTD3C-TLR-DISC
    WTD4C-TLR-DISC
    WTD5C-TLR-DISC

    Asymmetric
    Semi-hooked
    No brake track
    33/44/55 height
    430/470/500 weight
    21 internal, 28 max

    The 55mm version ticks all my boxes. A couple of branded rims are a bit lighter: ENVE's 54mm rim shaves about 50g per and Roval's CLX series (in 50mm and 64mm), closer to 75g per.

    Still, I'm impressed. When these appear on AceBike or wherever, I'll probably build a wheelset around them. Note that these 2017 models are named the same as the (very different, heavier, narrower, non-asym) 2016 version.

  21. #146
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    Tubeless- CX

    Quote Originally Posted by Black37 View Post
    Does anyone have experience with carbon TUBELESS rims from China? I have bought several frames and wheetsets in years past, but none that were advertised as tubeless.

    I am wanting to build up a set to run tubeless for cx and gravel road riding.
    Thanks!
    Bumping this- I also want to build up a set to run tubeless for gravel riding. Anyone have experience with the tubeless Chinese? Running disc brakes. Thanks

  22. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by Black37 View Post
    Bumping this- I also want to build up a set to run tubeless for gravel riding. Anyone have experience with the tubeless Chinese? Running disc brakes. Thanks
    You can run tubeless on almost any rim. If the bead shelf isn't high enough, the tire has a higher risk of burping. Solve this by adding more sealing tape. To answer your question directly with a single anecdote, I had no trouble pairing a set of generic carbon clincher rims with Schwalbe Pro One tires and sealant.

    That said-- just buy the rims I linked right above your post. They're designed for tubeless and priced competitively. Yishun quoted $360 shipped for a pair. They'll build you wheels if you're fine with DT 12mm hubs and Sapim CX-ray spokes.

  23. #148
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    Any thoughts on this build as a first foray into all around carbons? No mountains in riding route; longest climbs generally 1.2 miles at the longest.

    Light Bicycle
    55mm U Shape (tubeless ready but likely just ride clinchers)
    CX Ray
    Alloy Nips
    Bitex Hub

    Rider weight (ahem) 185lbs (but dropping. Honest.)

  24. #149
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    Hello everyone.
    Has anyone ordered from Yoeleo lately? I f so what was your wait time like?

    I put in an order for a set of Tubulars wheels about three weeks ago, I didn't get a confirmation e-mail and they have not replied to any of my e-mails.
    Was thinking about asking for my money back and going with Farsport or Light-Bicycle.

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