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  1. #1
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    Factory vs LBS Cut Spokes

    Is there any difference between spokes that come cut from the factory vs spokes cut to size and threaded (rolled) at quality LBS ?

  2. #2
    wheelbuilder
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    If the machine they use is maintained they will be good as new. Machines like from Phil Wood forge the threads just like the factory.

  3. #3
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    Agree with Ergott but I'd actually say that if the Phil Wood machine is properly adjusted with good dies, the machine threads are better than factory threads (typed as I'm about to go cut and thread a bunch of spokes on our well adjusted Phil Wood machine that has good dies). If they use a Hozan bench vise threader, the threads can be good but the adjustment of the threader has to be spot on.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by November Dave View Post
    Agree with Ergott but I'd actually say that if the Phil Wood machine is properly adjusted with good dies, the machine threads are better than factory threads (typed as I'm about to go cut and thread a bunch of spokes on our well adjusted Phil Wood machine that has good dies). If they use a Hozan bench vise threader, the threads can be good but the adjustment of the threader has to be spot on.
    Interesting, as someone who has only used hozan threaders, what's the difference?

  5. #5
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    Precision. One's basically a hand drill, one's a drill press. The collet adjustment on the Hozan threader is okay and can get the job done, but the Phil Wood cutter/threader a) cuts the spoke to super high precision length which saves a TON of time in building and b) will give you about, as an estimate, 3000 spokes with thread depths repeatable to .01mm through it before you need to futz with anything.

    Before we had the Phil machine we rigged up a Hozan in a bench-mounted fixture with a low speed hand drill to turn it. There were a few builds we did where we really wanted an odd numbered spoke length, but Sapim spokes come in even lengths. So you size up one and add 1mm of threads and that works fine. But you have to watch the thread depth adjustment like a hawk.

  6. #6
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    FWIW, rolled threads are much less likely to fail than cut threads are.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  7. #7
    wheelbuilder
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    Quote Originally Posted by November Dave View Post
    Agree with Ergott but I'd actually say that if the Phil Wood machine is properly adjusted with good dies, the machine threads are better than factory threads
    Indeed. I just got new dies in mine and ordered some upgraded parts to it. The machine works better than new now. This video is how I found out about the parts.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xt3Ty6bFAiI

    His contact is spokemaster@ymail.com.

  8. #8
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    'Cut' in this context refers to the length of the spoke, not the threads. Anyone who's cutting threads should be cut himself.

    Ergott did you talk to Leroy? That guy is an absolute ninja. Best customer service experience I've ever had.

  9. #9
    wheelbuilder
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    Quote Originally Posted by November Dave View Post
    'Cut' in this context refers to the length of the spoke, not the threads. Anyone who's cutting threads should be cut himself.

    Ergott did you talk to Leroy? That guy is an absolute ninja. Best customer service experience I've ever had.
    Pablo. Very nice to work with.

  10. #10
    Huge in Japan
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    Quote Originally Posted by November Dave View Post
    'Cut' in this context refers to the length of the spoke, not the threads. Anyone who's cutting threads should be cut himself.

    Ergott did you talk to Leroy? That guy is an absolute ninja. Best customer service experience I've ever had.
    I believe that No Time Toulouse is referring to the process of generating the thread itself. A cut thread is where material is cut or otherwise removed from the stock in a manner that results in a thread. Rolled threads displace material in a manner that results in a thread. In the end they both (should) conform to the thread specification in regards to geometry but differ in mechanical properties.

    One would hope that the threads are formed (rolled), absolutely.
    Interwebs bumpersticker goes here

  11. #11
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    Thanks, yeah, I understood his intent that way as well. We cut basically every spoke we use to length from a raw unthreaded blank, and there are zero filings/shavings/what have you as a result of this process. We'd be DROWNING in filings if the threads were cut instead of rolled.

    On the other hand, there's a tub on the floor with about 40 pounds worth of ~30mm cut off spoke ends.

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