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  1. #1
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    Folding Bead vs Rigid Bead

    I am thinking of buying Schwalbe Durano Plus tire - SmartGuard. It has a reputation for being very difficult to install. I was wondering, whether the folding bead or the rigid bead tire would be easier to install.

  2. #2
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    The "rigid" or wire bead tire is usually easier to mount than a Kevlar, or folding bead.

  3. #3
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    agree with peter.

    steel beaded tires are usually less expensive than their kevlar counterparts, and they're easier to install. i see little downside.

    tire jacks are pretty inexpensive ($15), so having one at home for stubborn tire/rim combos isn't a big deal. but getting stuck out on the road without one if that combo flats might be.
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    tire jacks are pretty inexpensive ($15), so having one at home for stubborn tire/rim combos isn't a big deal. but getting stuck out on the road without one if that combo flats might be.
    But I imagine there is plenty of room for a TJ in the bag... Name:  Emoticon-Think.gif
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  5. #5
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    I have 3 tire levers in my bag, and use all of them, usually. No problem.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    I have 3 tire levers in my bag, and use all of them, usually. No problem.
    Tire levers are great for removing the old tube, but not a great idea for mounting as you can pinch the new tube with them.

    Yes, wire bead tires are generally easier to mount, though wire bead tires generally have more rigid sidewalls and will give you a harsher ride.

    As far as the "tubeless rims are hard to mount" argument (and most new rims now are tubeless compatible), yes, they are harder, but there is a technique. After lots of cursing, once I learned the technique, it's no longer a big deal.

    The key is to work your way from the opposite end of the valve. Shove the tire bead inside the grove at that end and work your way with each hand around the tire until you get to the valve end. Be sure to continue squeezing the tire beads into the middle where the grove is. Snap, done! Curse words - zero!
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Tire levers are great for removing the old tube, but not a great idea for mounting as you can pinch the new tube with them.
    I do it all the time, no problem. You just have to pay attention, don't listen to the bystanders lauf'ing at the clown.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    I do it all the time, no problem. You just have to pay attention, don't listen to the bystanders lauf'ing at the clown.
    I always recommend leaving the levers out of the install part. The majority of people are barely capable of getting a tire on a rim much less being careful enough to not damage the tube.
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  9. #9
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    I have found this tool to be very helpful. Also, easy to take along.

    https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/tools/va...evers/?geoc=US

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by daniell View Post
    I have found this tool to be very helpful. Also, easy to take along.

    https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/tools/va...evers/?geoc=US
    i bought one of those var tools on ebay once when i had a set of ambrosio extra elite rims. those rims are notorious for mounting tires. and that french tool worked pretty well.

    i sold the tool on craigs for what i paid for it after i rid the wheelset.

    i recently came across the same model wheelset on a friend's bike i was overhauling. the tires were mounted backwards, which was really bugging me. i debated with myself if i should try to remove them and fix the problem. i finally did, just using two park plastic levers. it was really hard, though.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by daniell View Post
    I have found this tool to be very helpful. Also, easy to take along.

    https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/tools/va...evers/?geoc=US
    Yep, handy little tool.
    Too old to ride plastic

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    I always recommend leaving the levers out of the install part. The majority of people are barely capable of getting a tire on a rim much less being careful enough to not damage the tube.
    When I was a kid I remember figuring out how to use a screwdriver for a lever.

    Good thing those kids bikes had steel rims, other wise there would have been more than damaged tubes to worry about.
    Too old to ride plastic

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    the tires were mounted backwards, which was really bugging me.
    Were these MTB or CX tires, because with road tires, there really is no "backwards" despite the fact that there might be an arrow molded into the sidewall.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    When I was a kid I remember figuring out how to use a screwdriver for a lever.

    Good thing those kids bikes had steel rims, other wise there would have been more than damaged tubes to worry about.
    I used screw drivers when I was a kid too.

    These are awesome

    https://www.parktool.com/product/tire-lever-set-tl-4-2

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    Quote Originally Posted by daniell View Post
    It has a reputation for being very difficult to install.
    Let me guess. You googled some reviews and a lot of people had trouble mounting it?
    That would be true of any tire but especially 'recreational' tires such as that because it's users tend to have less experience.

    I doubt it should be a concern and if you have problems with that one you probably would with any. Just get which ever you want to get.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Were these MTB or CX tires, because with road tires, there really is no "backwards" despite the fact that there might be an arrow molded into the sidewall.
    I've wondered about the arrow on road tires as there is no forward or backward tread pattern. I guess just a marketing tool to make the end user think they are getting some extra performance by a specific mounting direction.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Let me guess. You googled some reviews and a lot of people had trouble mounting it?
    That would be true of any tire but especially 'recreational' tires such as that because it's users tend to have less experience.

    I doubt it should be a concern and if you have problems with that one you probably would with any. Just get which ever you want to get.
    Numerous reviews complain how difficult installation is. It was obvious to me that many were experienced riders.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    I've wondered about the arrow on road tires as there is no forward or backward tread pattern. I guess just a marketing tool to make the end user think they are getting some extra performance by a specific mounting direction.
    Using the directional arrows will keep the tire labeling on the same side. But it's probably easier to find the label than the arrow.
    Too old to ride plastic

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Were these MTB or CX tires, because with road tires, there really is no "backwards" despite the fact that there might be an arrow molded into the sidewall.
    the label was not centered over the stem and it was on the nds -- i.e. "backwards."

    and i always mount the arrow going the correct way, regardless of the difference it would make.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    I guess just a marketing tool to make the end user think they are getting some extra performance by a specific mounting direction.
    Maybe, but more likely it is there to prevent a lot of inquiries from people who want to know which way to mount the tires, even though it makes no difference which way you mount the tires.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Maybe, but more likely it is there to prevent a lot of inquiries from people who want to know which way to mount the tires, even though it makes no difference which way you mount the tires.
    Good point.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



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