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  1. #1
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    Angry Giant PSLR-1 aero failure

    Has anyone else experienced this. These PSLR-1 aero wheels have about 4000 miles on them and are three years old. This occurred a couple of weeks ago after two century rides. Giant dealers are not sure what happened. Both front and rear are cracked at the same spot. They are currently set up as tubeless. Needless to say, I am not riding on them.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Giant PLSR-1 aero failure-img_1898.jpg   Giant PLSR-1 aero failure-img_1895.jpg  
    Last edited by docboss; 4 Weeks Ago at 12:28 PM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by docboss View Post
    Has anyone else experienced this. These PSLR-1 aero wheels have about 4000 miles on them and are three years old. This occurred a couple of weeks ago after two century rides. Giant dealers are not sure what happened. Both front and rear are cracked at the same spot. They are currently set up as tubeless. Needless to say, I am not riding on them.
    Is that fairing structural? Does the spoke attach to the aluminum rim underneath or to the CF portion? If the spoke attaches to the aluminum rim, then this is mostly cosmetic. If the CF is structural then the wheels are pretty much toast. Caused by tightening the valve stem nut?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Is that fairing structural? Does the spoke attach to the aluminum rim underneath or to the CF portion? If the spoke attaches to the aluminum rim, then this is mostly cosmetic. If the CF is structural then the wheels are pretty much toast. Caused by tightening the valve stem nut?
    One Giant dealer said it was not "structural", but three others said it is, as the fairing is bonded to the aluminum. That, to me, sounds like "no".
    I spoke to the Giant shop that did the conversion to tubeless about the valve stem issue. They claim there is no way they would, or even could tighten them that much. In their opinion, it was caused by the flex of the rims, cracking the bonded fairing at its weakest point, the valve stem. None of the shops would recommend riding on them.
    I am a powerful, 215 lbs. rider. These wheels, are a rebranded DT, with 16/20 spokes that may not have been the best for me, per the shop.
    The Giant rep has seen the photos. His response..."not warrantied". No explanation of the cause.
    BTW. I ordered an Alto Cycling wheel set to replace them. Opinions please.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by docboss View Post
    .....
    I am a powerful, 215 lbs. rider. These wheels, ..... with 16/20 spokes ......
    Anybody else think this might be why it failed?
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Anybody else think this might be why it failed?
    Nope, looking at where the failure occurred, I'm going to go with poor design/engineering/manufacturing

    If the rider weight were the only problem, I would expect the problems to be with spokes, nipples, or the rim beds, not a crack parallel to the valve stem.

    I weigh more than the OP, and used to weigh a lot more than I do now, and have never had wheel problems, even with 16 spoke front wheels.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Anybody else think this might be why it failed?
    I'd put my money on the valve stem nut being too tight for the design.

    I can't see how a carbon fairing aluminum wheel would be structurally compromised with that crack though - I'd be asking Giant not getting opinions from shop or the internet though....
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Migen21 View Post
    Nope, looking at where the failure occurred, I'm going to go with poor design/engineering/manufacturing

    If the rider weight were the only problem, I would expect the problems to be with spokes, nipples, or the rim beds, not a crack parallel to the valve stem.

    I weigh more than the OP, and used to weigh a lot more than I do now, and have never had wheel problems, even with 16 spoke front wheels.
    My question would be which 16 spoke front wheels did you have? I am only 180lbs. and the only 16/20 spoke wheels I would ever ride would be Shimano. And I still wouldn't take these on extended rides into sparsely populated areas with spotty cell coverage. If you break a spoke on a 24+ spoke wheel, you can adjust the other spokes well enough to get home. If you break a spoke on a 16 or 20 spoke wheel, you are SOL.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Anybody else think this might be why it failed?
    I do. I was destroying breaking spokes and hubs on 16 /20 spoke wheels when I was 205lbs...... Four different models from three different brands. I was always in the 53 tooth chain ring and mashing. Wheels were failing on climbs, which tells me that they couldn't handle the torque I was dishing out. I changed my riding style to spin more. Problem hasn't returned. I don't want to say that is the case, but for me, it was. Goes to show that low spokes count wheels still aren't the best choice for many riders. If you have to change your riding style to get longer life out of them, it's not you. There's a reason higher spoke count wheels are recommended as the best all around wheels by wheel builders.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by terbennett View Post
    I do. I was destroying breaking spokes and hubs on 16 /20 spoke wheels when I was 205lbs...... Four different models from three different brands. I was always in the 53 tooth chain ring and mashing. Wheels were failing on climbs, which tells me that they couldn't handle the torque I was dishing out. I changed my riding style to spin more. Problem hasn't returned. I don't want to say that is the case, but for me, it was. Goes to show that low spokes count wheels still aren't the best choice for many riders. If you have to change your riding style to get longer life out of them, it's not you. There's a reason higher spoke count wheels are recommended as the best all around wheels by wheel builders.
    Exactly. For a low spoke count wheel to be strong, the rim has to be beefed up which negates any weight savings of a low spoke wheel.

    So why are there so many low spoke wheels? Because they are considered "sexy" and sex sells.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



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