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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by RangerDD View Post
    That Backcountry discount only works on full-price items, and the RS500 is already on sale for $299 (in lots of different places). But especially in light of Lombard's revised quality update, looks like maybe it's back to square one and pulling the trigger on this wheelset. Many of the specs are near-identical to the Pure Aero pair on sale at BWW for $249, though I'm not sure those are tubeless ready (sent them that question but no response yet). All in all, Shimano's track record (and quietness) is a powerful enticement despite the general popularity of BWW.
    The BWW Pure's aren't tubeless. But the Blackset are. Their website isn't all updated yet, but they do have tubeless rims in all the Blackset sizes. I just spoke to them a couple weeks ago about it.

    BWW usually answers emails within a day. They're really helpful with answering any questions you have.
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  2. #27
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    Good cheap wheelset?

    Quote Originally Posted by RangerDD View Post
    That Backcountry discount only works on full-price items, and the RS500 is already on sale for $299 (in lots of different places). But especially in light of Lombard's revised quality update, looks like maybe it's back to square one and pulling the trigger on this wheelset. Many of the specs are near-identical to the Pure Aero pair on sale at BWW for $249, though I'm not sure those are tubeless ready (sent them that question but no response yet). All in all, Shimano's track record (and quietness) is a powerful enticement despite the general popularity of BWW.
    My son just bought a set of these wheels. They are nice. Also, they have no spoke holes in the rim bed, so no tape or rim strip is required like other so called tubeless rims. Much easier and more reliable to set up tubeless, if you want to go that way.

  3. #28
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    I checked out the Blackset wheels, which aren't recommended for riders over 195 lbs. (my weight exactly).

  4. #29
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by RangerDD View Post
    I checked out the Blackset wheels, which aren't recommended for riders over 195 lbs. (my weight exactly).
    They are hand built 24/28 with CXray spokes. They'll be significantly stronger than the machine built RS500 16/20 wheels.
    If you're concerned about the Blackset, you should run away from the RS500.
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  5. #30
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    I'm so confused...!?

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    They are hand built 24/28 with CXray spokes. They'll be significantly stronger than the machine built RS500 16/20 wheels.
    If you're concerned about the Blackset, you should run away from the RS500.
    The RS500s have a max weight rating of 220lbs. Ordinarily, I'm not a fan of low spoke count wheels and the RS500s are 16/20. However, Shimano is generally on top of their game. Lower spoke count wheels will generally have heavier, more robust rims to compensate for the greater forces on each spoke hole.

    I don't think you would go wrong with either these or the BWW Pure mentioned earlier in this thread. The Blacksets are indeed a good wheelset, but they are at the limit of your weight, not to mention $100 more than you want to spend. Then again, buying those wheels could be an incentive to lose weight.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

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    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  7. #32
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    "Then again, buying those wheels could be an incentive to lose weight."

    Right, in the same way that noisy hubs are an incentive to keep pedaling...

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by RangerDD View Post
    I need to replace the worn-out wheelset that came with my 2013 Giant Defy Advanced.
    How did the old wheels wear out?
    How were they built - # spokes?
    Do you really ever plan to run tubeless? How many flats do you get a year?

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Z'mer View Post
    How did the old wheels wear out?
    How were they built - # spokes?
    Do you really ever plan to run tubeless? How many flats do you get a year?
    1. Dent in front rim; cracks in rear rim at every spoke on drivetrain side
    2. 18 front/23 rear
    3. Now running tubeless on another (CX) bike
    4. Several, including two on one recent ride.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Z'mer View Post
    They are pretty quiet, not loud at all. But not totally silent like Shimano. Like any other typical cartridge hub, you need clean / redo lube when they start to get noisy, maybe every 2000-4000 miles, or less. Very easy to take apart and clean though, unlike Shimano which basically you never take apart (unless you are very brave).
    Yeah, this pretty much. Way quieter than Mavic, a little quieter than DT Swiss, not quite as quiet as Shimano. Freewheel noise generally doesn't bother me at all though so I might not be the best judge.
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  11. #36
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by RangerDD View Post
    1. Dent in front rim; cracks in rear rim at every spoke on drivetrain side
    2. 18 front/23 rear
    And now you're considering a wheel that's 16/20.
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  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    And now you're considering a wheel that's 16/20.
    Rim strength is way more important than the number of spokes, in my opinion. Shimano rims are reinforced at the spoke holes so they are resistant to cracking. I've had a number of 32 spoke rims crack and break spokes as well while these Shimano wheels have outlasted them. YMMV

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by RangerDD View Post
    1. Dent in front rim; cracks in rear rim at every spoke on drivetrain side
    2. 18 front/23 rear
    3. Now running tubeless on another (CX) bike
    4. Several, including two on one recent ride.
    How many miles before you noticed the cracks in the rear wheel?
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
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    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  14. #39
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    7,000+

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by RangerDD View Post
    7,000+
    Well that's not as bad as my old Bontrager Race wheels which cracked at 4,000 miles. But rims should not crack at 7K miles. Giant's self-branded stock wheels are low end.

    As the saying goes:

    1) Light
    2) Durable
    3) Cheap

    Pick two.

    We already know you want cheap. So which is more important to you - light or durable? In other words,would you rather have a 1600g wheelset that lasts only 10K miles, or a 2000g wheelset that lasts 20K miles?
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  16. #41
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    Since I only ride this bike some of the time (I have multiple others), it's gonna take a long time to put 10K on it. Among all wheelsets we've been discussing, I'm not sure what the durable alternative would be. Performance sells a "Wheelhouse" set with Ultegra hubs and 36-hole Mavic Open Pro rims, but some people in this forum have been badmouthing the Mavic OP (as obsolete, it seems).

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by RangerDD View Post
    Since I only ride this bike some of the time (I have multiple others), it's gonna take a long time to put 10K on it. Among all wheelsets we've been discussing, I'm not sure what the durable alternative would be. Performance sells a "Wheelhouse" set with Ultegra hubs and 36-hole Mavic Open Pro rims, but some people in this forum have been badmouthing the Mavic OP (as obsolete, it seems).
    Open Pro rims are not durable. I cracked one in 6000 miles, and had eyelet breakage and creaking at the joint on others. They recently came out with a new Open Pro, so I don't know about those.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by RangerDD View Post
    Since I only ride this bike some of the time (I have multiple others), it's gonna take a long time to put 10K on it. Among all wheelsets we've been discussing, I'm not sure what the durable alternative would be.
    Some people are just harder on wheels, as demonstrated by their past problems. This tends to go up as weight goes up, but not always.

    Usually, "durable" means, above all, properly built. This means proper tension, and equal tension on all spokes. Both are very important.

    After that, usually more material in the rim, deeper rim, and more spokes makes a wheel more durable.

    Also a consideration is repairs. If you break a spoke, is a replacement easy (same day, cheap), or a major headache (custom order, weeks delay, expensive).
    If a wheel uses common spokes, it's easy, proprietary spokes, headache. BTW, Shimano wheelsets use proprietary spokes.

    If you can afford the bike downtime, buy whatever strikes your fancy. If it was a daily commuter, or you put 5-8K /yr on the wheels and wanted 3-5+ years from them, you would need to be more careful, likely spend more $ in the 2nd case.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by RangerDD View Post
    Since I only ride this bike some of the time (I have multiple others), it's gonna take a long time to put 10K on it. Among all wheelsets we've been discussing, I'm not sure what the durable alternative would be. Performance sells a "Wheelhouse" set with Ultegra hubs and 36-hole Mavic Open Pro rims, but some people in this forum have been badmouthing theMavic OP (as obsolete, it seems).
    Mentioning Mavic Open Pro and durable in the same sentence doesn't usually happen. Mavic OPs are known for spoke hole cracking. Durable alternative - NOT.

    Stick with these three choices:

    Shimano Ultegra RS500 (220lb. weight limit)
    BWW Pure Aero (220lb. weight limit)
    Hand built DT460s laced to Shimano 105 5800s:

    https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...8&category=245

    https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...7&category=245

    You won't go wrong with any of these.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Z'mer View Post
    Usually, "durable" means, above all, properly built. This means proper tension, and equal tension on all spokes. Both are very important.
    Unless you meticulously build your own wheels, this will not happen. I don't think I have one single wheelset I didn't build myself that had equal spoke tensions. That's certainly not happening with machine built wheels.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Unless you meticulously build your own wheels, this will not happen. I don't think I have one single wheelset I didn't build myself that had equal spoke tensions. That's certainly not happening with machine built wheels.
    HA!

    And I will leave it there.

  22. #47
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    I've been impressed with quality and customer service -- and value -- from John Neugent, now operating as Home. The wheels are well designed, precision built and super durable.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by leapfrog View Post
    I've been impressed with quality and customer service -- and value -- from John Neugent, now operating as Home. The wheels are well designed, precision built and super durable.
    Interesting the detail they have on building. Though I didn't find any info on what brand of rims and hubs they use.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  24. #49
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    +1 on Neugent wheels. I got a set last year for around 400$ shipped. They weigh just over 1400 grams and are holding up great. He has some lower priced wheels as well.

    Hand built in California. And its nice to know if I ever need them rebuilt, I can just mail them back to John for a rebuild.

    John also helped me pick out the correct wheels for my weight, and intended use. Great customer service.

  25. #50
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    Kinlin

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