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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Good High Pressure Road Pump?

    I need a new high pressure pump for my 700x23 tires while riding.

    1. Does anyone know if the Enkeeo pumps are any good?
    Enkeeo Mini Bike Bicycle Pump High Pressure Air Tire Inflator Portable120 PSI | eBay

    2. Any solid brands you'd recommend?

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Lezyne pumps are all I use now. Floor, travel and large Road Drive or Micro Floor Drive on the bikes. The floor pumps go to 200 PSI.
    Last edited by cdhbrad; 03-11-2017 at 12:09 PM.

  3. #3
    grizzly moderator
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    Zefal HPX is the pump I like the best from all others. It's a frame pump, not a mini pump
    With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important.

  4. #4
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    I've had good luck with the Topeak RaceRocket HPX.
    Too old to ride plastic

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyberbiker View Post
    I need a new high pressure pump for my 700x23 tires while riding.

    1. Does anyone know if the Enkeeo pumps are any good?
    Enkeeo Mini Bike Bicycle Pump High Pressure Air Tire Inflator Portable120 PSI | eBay

    2. Any solid brands you'd recommend?
    I like my Lezyne Road Drive (size large).

  6. #6
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    What do you mean by high pressure? If you're talking over, say, 110 you kind of need to accept that you have to use a frame pump or just accept riding home with less.

    Anyway, as far as small pumps go Lezyne are the best and most convenient I've used. Except when the screw on hose unscrews a removable valve core and it rockets in to the woods.

  7. #7
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    Thanks, all. I used the Zefal on the Trek 1000 that was stolen. Had the Zefal for years. Just wanted some proven suggestions for a replacement.

  8. #8
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    Here is the Large Leyzne at a good price.
    Do you attach it to the top tube with 2 Velcro straps? I prefer 2 water bottles in the lower tubes.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B005X7I6YM

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    No, the bracket you see in the photo goes behind the bottle cage on then Seat tube. The pump does not interfere with the bottle.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    I've had good luck with the Topeak RaceRocket HPX.
    +1 for RaceRocket HPX

  11. #11
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    Thanks for the suggestions. All three brands you mentioned get good ratings.

    Lezyne
    Zefal HPX
    RaceRocket HPX

    I ended up buying a large Lenzye Road Bike Pump at the Amazon link earlier in the thread. The $30 price was right and the Lenzye pumps to 160 psi. My 700x23 tires call for 120psi.

    Cheers!

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyberbiker View Post
    Thanks for the suggestions. All three brands you mentioned get good ratings.

    Lezyne
    Zefal HPX
    RaceRocket HPX

    I ended up buying a large Lenzye Road Bike Pump at the Amazon link earlier in the thread. The $30 price was right and the Lenzye pumps to 160 psi. My 700x23 tires call for 120psi.

    Cheers!
    Unless you are a very large individual, 120psi is too many psi's.
    Too old to ride plastic

  13. #13
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    Sorry,,, Excuse me but carrying a pump on a bike is like buying an 8-track player for your new car!! Unless of course you're in a remote area and CO2 cartridges are extinct.

    Pumps need to die the slow death of the floppies, 8-tracks, and spoke marbles..

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by n2deep View Post
    Sorry,,, Excuse me but carrying a pump on a bike is like buying an 8-track player for your new car!! Unless of course you're in a remote area and CO2 cartridges are extinct.

    Pumps need to die the slow death of the floppies, 8-tracks, and spoke marbles..
    How many co2 canisters are needed to be carried to ensure enough are carried to cover a days flats? A spare tube and a Rema patch kit will get through about 7 flats, and a pump will fill them all. That's a lot of co2 to carry.

    Of course that's extreme, but I've been out with my wife when she's had four flats in a 25 mile ride.
    Too old to ride plastic

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    four flats in a 25 mile ride.
    Where was this? So that I will cross it out in my future travel plans.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    How many co2 canisters are needed to be carried to ensure enough are carried to cover a days flats? A spare tube and a Rema patch kit will get through about 7 flats, and a pump will fill them all. That's a lot of co2 to carry.

    Of course that's extreme, but I've been out with my wife when she's had four flats in a 25 mile ride.
    Four flats in one ride??? Thats got to be a record.. When I first started riding I carried all the junk but have learned that two cartridges, a few patches and a spare tube is enough!!! A lot of the spares we carry needs to be tempered with the condition of our bike, I routinely replace tires and tubes every couple of thousand miles or every year. Its not worth the risk to ride old tires/tubes. .

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by n2deep View Post
    Four flats in one ride??? Thats got to be a record.. When I first started riding I carried all the junk but have learned that two cartridges, a few patches and a spare tube is enough!!! A lot of the spares we carry needs to be tempered with the condition of our bike, I routinely replace tires and tubes every couple of thousand miles or every year. Its not worth the risk to ride old tires/tubes. .
    you routinely change tires every 2K miles or annually...?

    seems like an odd way to deal with a 'wear' item...most people go by condition of the tread/sidewall, not mileage or time.

    and a one-year old tube isn't any more prone to punctures. have some that are easily 5+ years old that are still perfectly serviceable.
    the 45th POTUS is inept, corrupt, and a pathological liar. and those may be his better qualities...

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    Where was this? So that I will cross it out in my future travel plans.
    South west of Chicago, but it doesn't matter where, sometimes the stars just line up that way.
    Too old to ride plastic

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by n2deep View Post
    Four flats in one ride??? Thats got to be a record.. When I first started riding I carried all the junk but have learned that two cartridges, a few patches and a spare tube is enough!!! A lot of the spares we carry needs to be tempered with the condition of our bike, I routinely replace tires and tubes every couple of thousand miles or every year. Its not worth the risk to ride old tires/tubes. .
    Her flats were on relatively new tires, but like I responded to bvber's post, sometimes stuff happens. I wouldn't replace a tire or tube by the mileage, but by the wear. I've had tires wear out by 1500 miles, while changing a rear out at 4000 miles because I thought that was plenty, but there looks to be enough wear left that I haven't brought myself to pitching it. And the front that I switched to the rear when swapping out that tire made it to just shy of 8000 miles. I pushed that tire longer than I should have, but I had to see what I could get out of it. And that tire never flatted.

    That was extreme, especially considering that the tire had no flat protection belt, but it was also a large, high volume low pressure tire(650b\42mm). And I've used tubes through 2 and 3 tire swaps, and other tubes that have seen lots of patches.

    When it comes to tires and flats it's important to pay attention to road conditions. I tend to ride it the automotive right tire paths on the road that is relatively clean, being constantly swept free of debris by the traffic. Riding on the shoulder or nearer the curb puts the cyclist right in the flat causing debris that's been pushed there by the automobiles.

    My wife flats more me, she being relatively timid when it comes to dealing with the traffic, so she is riding through the debris fields more than I am.
    Too old to ride plastic

  20. #20
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    I range from 195-205 depending on schedule demands. 105-110psi has always worked well for me. The 160psi Lezyne limit just seemed to reflect good seals that would make 110-120psi easy.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oxtox View Post
    you routinely change tires every 2K miles or annually...?

    seems like an odd way to deal with a 'wear' item...most people go by condition of the tread/sidewall, not mileage or time.

    and a one-year old tube isn't any more prone to punctures. have some that are easily 5+ years old that are still perfectly serviceable.
    Around here 2K will get you to the end of their life span.. IMHO, Good components will buy you more rides, less hassle.. Cheap insurance for a few bucks..

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyberbiker View Post
    the Lenzye pumps to 160 psi. My 700x23 tires call for 120psi.
    Getting a tire to 160 psi with this pump will require very strong arms and a very long time. Realistically the 160 psi number reflects seal design rather than any practical use. Your tires do NOT call for 120 psi. That is their rated max pressure. If you need anything over 110 psi (some would argue 100 psi) to prevent pinch flats, then you need wider tires.

  23. #23
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    +1 on the Lezyne Road Drive, mine has been used many, many times. The only thing I don't like about it is you have to keep track of the dust caps coming off while using (just don't forget to do inventory when you put everything away and get back to your ride).

    Due to some coupons somebody here shared one time, I also got this pump and it works fine as well, fits better in my jersey pocket:
    https://www.amazon.com/Uniche-Pressu.../dp/B01N1Q0ZQ5 (with gauge)
    https://www.amazon.com/Uniche-Pressu.../dp/B01N9FANP0 (w/o gauge)

    On shorter rides I use the Unich, but I have to admit if I'm going on a longer remote ride or group ride where there's greater chance the pump will come into play, I bring the Lezyne.

    I personally would always suggest hand pump that has a hose attachment so you are not stressing your valve stem, they tear off way too easy.
    Last edited by jetdog9; 03-15-2017 at 08:18 AM.

  24. #24
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    Lezyne Drive Mini every time. Will get to around 100 psi in 100 strokes. Never suffered problems of pulling valves or valve cores out. I'm on my second one - the first fell out of my jersey pocket and was squashed by a truck.

    It still worked.

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